#1
Alright so I've been paying more and more attention to my voice because of my guitar playing and I want to try and fix some of the problems that I may have. Some people say that I am tone deaf, and some say that I don't sing with enough "emotion and feeling." I think that both of those somehow relate back to having some sort of monotone voice? and I want to change that. Is there anything else I can do, outside of a vocal teacher? Can a vocal teacher even help with this?

Here's an example - play it until at least the chorus to get a full understanding, because I think that's where I have the most trouble.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUa9KLvdlfo

Thanks
#2
sounds like you're singing too low in your range since you're singing it an octave down, that's gonna make you sound monotonous and weak no matter how good you are. transpose the song up a few steps and see where that takes you.
#3
Quote by Cheeseman07
sounds like you're singing too low in your range since you're singing it an octave down, that's gonna make you sound monotonous and weak no matter how good you are. transpose the song up a few steps and see where that takes you.


+1, it sounds like you are singing at the bottom end of your range, which will definatly make it sound much more monotonus and kind of boring, I would definatly suggest either transposing it up, or singing a higher song.

Also, if you don't think you can't hit any higher notes, mabey look into diaphramic breathing. Basically, diaphramic breathing will help you get more air into your lungs while singing, which can help you hit higher notes. I started doing this two days ago, and I'm already seeing an improvement with my range.

I don't think you are actually tone deaf, most people aren't even if they have trouble hitting the right key, tone deaf is when you actually can't even hear when someone is singing off key, because of a problem with your ears. Listen back to yourself singing, if you can actually hear when you miss the right note, you are not tone deaf, you just have problems hitting the right notes, which is fixable.

For now just work on singing a little higher, and see where it goes from there.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
Last edited by sites.nick at Jul 3, 2010,
#6
Sounds much better then the original, but could still use some work.

I would work on singing less nasaly next. It sounds like your singing through your nose, so you want to focus on singing out of your mouth. Try singing while looking in the mirror, and make sure you are opening your mouth really big, if your mouth isn't that big, you may not be getting as much out of it.

Hope that helps
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#7
I would not recommend singing opening your mouth wider to get rid of singing nasally. It's pretty common among singers to be singing 'too wide' (for example, making your vowels sound more open than in your speaking voice), which can stem from opening your mouth too widely.

I think you should try to adjust your resonance to be lower (less in your nose). A great way to practice is to do an exercise involving the 'ng' sound.

Just as a disclaimer, if you've never done voice exercises before, they're a lot 'weirder' than guitar exercises. You wouldn't find yourself doing them in a public place, and you'll probably feel silly doing them, but believe me, if you do them, results will come to you surprisingly quickly.

I pulled an excerpt from this website:

Resonance Wake-Up:

This warm up does as its name suggests: It wakes up the resonance of your voice. It is also excellent for examining and developing the basic vowel sounds used in singing. This exercise uses a series of different vowel to consonant combinations. As you do this, use a basic speaking volume only, on a comfortable midrange pitch. The consonant will be an "NG." You shape this consonant with the back of your tongue and soft palate. The back of your tongue raises and lightly meets your soft palate. To find this, say the word "sing" and sustain the "NG" position at the end of the word.

Take a breath. With your mouth kept slightly open and unmoving, rest the tip of your tongue against the back of your bottom teeth.
Put the back of your tongue in the "NG" position and begin sustaining a comfortable midrange pitch.
Feel the vibration shimmer along the roof of your mouth.
Sustaining the same pitch, change to an "AH" vowel (pronounced as in "wand"). The back of your tongue will naturally lower and relax as you sustain the "AH" vowel.
On the same breath, alternate from the "NG" consonant with the vowel as many times as you can, NG-AH, NG-AH, NG-AH, etc.
Repeat using the same vowel until you experience muscle relaxation in the back of your mouth and throat. Then go to the next NG-vowel combination.


The sequence goes as follows:
NG-AH (Wand)
NG-EE (Seem)
NG-A (Same)
NG-AA (Apple)
NG-Eh (When)
NG-Uh (Some)
NG-I (Him)
Last edited by minichibi at Jul 6, 2010,
#8
Quote by minichibi
I would not recommend singing opening your mouth wider to get rid of singing nasally. It's pretty common among singers to be singing 'too wide' (for example, making your vowels sound more open than in your speaking voice), which can stem from opening your mouth too widely.

I think you should try to adjust your resonance to be lower (less in your nose). A great way to practice is to do an exercise involving the 'ng' sound.


True opening your mouth too wide could be a problem, but it doesn't sound like the problem your having, sounds like you aren't opening it big enough... Over all I'de still listen to this guy though, he sounds like he knows what he's talking about more than I do.

Also, if you do try to work on opening your mouth bigger, focus more on "tall" instead of wide.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
Last edited by sites.nick at Jul 6, 2010,
#9
Quote by sites.nick
True opening your mouth too wide could be a problem, but it doesn't sound like the problem your having, sounds like you aren't opening it big enough... Over all I'de still listen to this guy though, he sounds like he knows what he's talking about more than I do.

Also, if you do try to work on opening your mouth bigger, focus more on "tall" instead of wide.


Yes. Although I would still think that opening your mouth isn't ideal, but if you raise your soft palate it can feel as if you're making your voice 'taller'. The soft palate is towards/at the back of your throat.

As in the bit I pasted in from that website, you can feel what it's like to raise your soft palate by making an "ng" sound. Say "sing" and sustain the "ng."
#10
Thanks a lot to the both of you. What's a decent amount of time to do the resonance exercise for? 15 minutes? an hour?