#1
...As the title suggests.


I'm gonna tackle this song when I get my new strat next month, and as i've been memorizing my scales in all positions I wanted to learn a song to do when i'm not practicing scales or chords.


Thanks.
#2
it's in E minor
Quote by Night
wtf is a selfie? is that like, touching yourself or something?
#5
Quote by Slayertplsko
It's not. It's in Eb.
Correct. It uses the positions of E minor, but is tuned a half-step down.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#6
Quote by food1010
Correct. It uses the positions of E minor, but is tuned a half-step down.


technically yes, but if you were tuned normal, you'd probably just play it in E minor...not Eb minor.
shred is gaudy music
#7
Quote by GuitarMunky
technically yes, but if you were tuned normal, you'd probably just play it in E minor...not Eb minor.

Doesn't matter, the song is still in Eb minor. If you were tuned to normal you'd be playing the song transposed a half step up.
#8
Quote by JackMorris
Doesn't matter, the song is still in Eb minor. If you were tuned to normal you'd be playing the song transposed a half step up.


^ obviously, so you're post is the thing that doesn't matter.

Hendrix played this in Eb simply because he tuned his guitar that way.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 3, 2010,
#9
This argument is pointless. If you were in E standard tuning you would play it in E minor, but if you were in Eb standard, then you would play it in Eb minor.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
Quote by food1010
This argument is pointless. If you were in E standard tuning you would play it in E minor, but if you were in Eb standard, then you would play it in Eb minor.


Exactly, thank you.
shred is gaudy music
#11
Its not all E minor since there is a F major chord on one part of the progression, But until the F chord comes up you can solo in E minor and when the F Chord comes you can change into the G blues minor pentatonic for a really really cool feeling try it!
#12
Quote by Gilbert_fan
Its not all E minor since there is a F major chord on one part of the progression, But until the F chord comes up you can solo in E minor and when the F Chord comes you can change into the G blues minor pentatonic for a really really cool feeling try it!
It actually is all in E(b) minor. The F (E) chord is just a substitution, it doesn't change the key.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#13
Quote by food1010
It actually is all in E(b) minor. The F (E) chord is just a substitution, it doesn't change the key.

Substitution for what? The E minor scale Ive learned didnt include F ;O
#14
Quote by Gilbert_fan
Substitution for what? The E minor scale Ive learned didnt include F ;O
Exactly! And that's why it's a substitution! If it were in key, it wouldn't be a substitution. Well I guess you could have a diatonic substitution, but that's beside the point.

The way I look at it is as a substitution from G(b) minor. You may think "well, how does that work?" It's actually rather simple.

For simplicity's sake, let's just talk as if the song was in standard tuning (key of E minor, then). You know that E minor and G major are relative keys. The song actually switches back and forth between the two pretty often. The intro starts off with that minor feel, but then gravitates towards the relative major once it hits that G chord. So now we're in G major. G minor is the parallel minor of G major, a common basis for substitution. In fact, the bVII (F) is very very often borrowed in a major key from a minor key. G F C D is a simple common addition to a standard I IV V progression.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#15
Quote by food1010
Exactly! And that's why it's a substitution! If it were in key, it wouldn't be a substitution. Well I guess you could have a diatonic substitution, but that's beside the point.

The way I look at it is as a substitution from G(b) minor. You may think "well, how does that work?" It's actually rather simple.

For simplicity's sake, let's just talk as if the song was in standard tuning (key of E minor, then). You know that E minor and G major are relative keys. The song actually switches back and forth between the two pretty often. The intro starts off with that minor feel, but then gravitates towards the relative major once it hits that G chord. So now we're in G major. G minor is the parallel minor of G major, a common basis for substitution. In fact, the bVII (F) is very very often borrowed in a major key from a minor key. G F C D is a simple common addition to a standard I IV V progression.

Okay I think I get it So the F Chord is borrowed from G minor, there for you change the VII From F#dim - G Major to the bVII from G minor so you avoid the dim chord for example? Or am i just dizzzy? haha thanks for answering this,
#16
I'm just learning theory and I'm wondering what makes Little Wing be in the key of E minor/Eb minor. Is it just the notes played. The seven notes from that minor scale are the only ones played or what?
#17
Quote by Gilbert_fan
Okay I think I get it So the F Chord is borrowed from G minor, there for you change the VII From F#dim - G Major to the bVII from G minor so you avoid the dim chord for example? Or am i just dizzzy? haha thanks for answering this,
Yeah essentially. I mean, that's not the only reason why it's common as a substitution, but it is one reason.

Just thought of another way to look at it, probably a simpler, more accurate way:

The supertonic which is diatonic to a minor key is a iio (2 4 6). A bII is b2 4 6, which seems like a rather simple chromatic alteration to me. It shares the 4 and 6, and flattens the 2 by a half-step.

The song does sort of modulate to G major once it hits that G chord, but this is a good way to look at it in terms of E minor.

Quote by countrygentlema
I'm just learning theory and I'm wondering what makes Little Wing be in the key of E minor/Eb minor. Is it just the notes played. The seven notes from that minor scale are the only ones played or what?
Essentially. I mean, it does use a few notes which are out of key (F being one of them) but that's just a simple chromatic alteration; practically everything else is diatonic (other than passing tones and bends and what not).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jul 3, 2010,
#18
Quote by countrygentlema
I'm just learning theory and I'm wondering what makes Little Wing be in the key of E minor/Eb minor. Is it just the notes played. The seven notes from that minor scale are the only ones played or what?


Bump.
#19
Quote by countrygentlema
Bump.
I answered your question...
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#20
Quote by food1010
I answered your question...


My apologies. I only saw the first half of your post and assumed you were just chiming in on the argument of whether it was E or Eb minor. I didn't bother reading the rest. Thanks for the response.