#1
how will triads improve my guitar playing, will it help me make new voicings and stuff? got this book which is telling me to learn the triads and its inversions...
#2
triads are the basis of any chord.

Look at your A major open chord for example. The only notes it contains are the triad for A major, A C# and E.

Everything you learn will improve your playing, whether you immediately see it or not.

Are you telling me theyre out of dragons?
They never had dragons..
Who didnt?
The world..
GET THIS GUY OUT OF HERE, FIND ME A DRAGON
#3
^ this, and knowing triads will help you analyze what chords will work well with each other, for example if you are writting you own song, knowing the traids, and how to use them will make your chord progressions much more effective.
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get back in the kitchen"
#4
Three string sweep picks are technically triads... Go figure
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#5
Quote by simpleben09
Three string sweep picks are technically triads... Go figure
Not always, especially when you add the legato notes.

A triad is when a dry toneless diad first gets its tonal identity as major or minor. Unless your weird.
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#6
Triads are the basics of chords, like everyone else has said. Learning about triads will help you construct any chord on any degree of a scale.

F G A Bb C D E

That's an F major scale. Since triads are just two thirds stack on top of a root, just start on any note in your scale and you can make your triad. Let's start on the ii, which is G. One third from G is Bb and a third from Bb is D, so you end up with G, Bb, and D. That would be a G Minor triad, or a G Minor chord. It's really that simple. If you have a piano, try doing it on there, it makes it a lot easier to understand IMO.
#7
listen to the advice of everyone here. learn your triads lol

your guitar playing will improve faster if you listen to what more experienced players try to say rather than questioning it and thinking "why should i learn this?"

trust me, i went down that road and i regret it.
#8
how will triads improve my guitar playing, will it help me make new voicings and stuff? got this book which is telling me to learn the triads and its inversions...


Is learning to play guitar really that much of an effort that you have to be persuaded?
#9
Quote by B&J
how will triads improve my guitar playing, will it help me make new voicings and stuff? got this book which is telling me to learn the triads and its inversions...


I understand Diatonic Triads, Chords (same shit, really), inversions and all, practicing on a daily that but MY question is: What's it got to do with Bass? I understand chords just kind of broaden my spectrum, but I'd like to know how to relate it to my bass guistars. OTHER than sweep picking! What do chords have in store for me? All these diatonic TRIADS dont seem to mean shit cause I'm only playing root notes, really. I can spice it up with the nonharmonic tones but there's 7 other notes in the scale, what's special about them 3?

While i'm hear I'd also like to clear up my confusion on the Circle of Fifths. I get that it's all of the Major and Minor scales in order but other than simplicity in practicing, what's its purpose? Especially when I hear that bassists exclusively need to know about it.
#10
Quote by Pipwud
I understand Diatonic Triads, Chords (same shit, really), inversions and all, practicing on a daily that but MY question is: What's it got to do with Bass? I understand chords just kind of broaden my spectrum, but I'd like to know how to relate it to my bass guistars. OTHER than sweep picking! What do chords have in store for me? All these diatonic TRIADS dont seem to mean shit cause I'm only playing root notes, really. I can spice it up with the nonharmonic tones but there's 7 other notes in the scale, what's special about them 3?

While i'm hear I'd also like to clear up my confusion on the Circle of Fifths. I get that it's all of the Major and Minor scales in order but other than simplicity in practicing, what's its purpose? Especially when I hear that bassists exclusively need to know about it.


Firstly, this should probably belong in the bass forum
Secondly, and to answer your question, learning how to construct chords can help your bass playing, by allowing you to play notes OTHER than the root (or base note, if its an inversion) behind a given chord.
So take a Am chord. Instead of just playing the A, you can now know to play a C or an E note if you choose to.

It can also help with any solos you take, or bass fills.
There are other places it can help (such as tapping) but I'd say those are good places to start.
#11
Quote by Pipwud
I understand Diatonic Triads, Chords (same shit, really), inversions and all, practicing on a daily that but MY question is: What's it got to do with Bass? I understand chords just kind of broaden my spectrum, but I'd like to know how to relate it to my bass guistars. OTHER than sweep picking! What do chords have in store for me? All these diatonic TRIADS dont seem to mean shit cause I'm only playing root notes, really. I can spice it up with the nonharmonic tones but there's 7 other notes in the scale, what's special about them 3?

While i'm hear I'd also like to clear up my confusion on the Circle of Fifths. I get that it's all of the Major and Minor scales in order but other than simplicity in practicing, what's its purpose? Especially when I hear that bassists exclusively need to know about it.


if your knowledge of chords is limited to diatonic triads to the point that you consider them the same shit, then your knowledge of chords is extremely limited. i'd get on that.

playing only root notes doesn't get boring to you?
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#12
Quote by Freepower
Is learning to play guitar really that much of an effort that you have to be persuaded?


Whats the problem with, asking question so that u know the reason why you learn something..
#13
Quote by B&J
Whats the problem with, asking question so that u know the reason why you learn something..

freepowers whole point is why do you need to know a reason to learn something..

if you really want to learn an instrument and music in general, why would you NOT want to learn anything and everything related that there is to know?

Are you telling me theyre out of dragons?
They never had dragons..
Who didnt?
The world..
GET THIS GUY OUT OF HERE, FIND ME A DRAGON
#14
Quote by glenthemann
freepowers whole point is why do you need to know a reason to learn something..

if you really want to learn an instrument and music in general, why would you NOT want to learn anything and everything related that there is to know?


Whats the point of knowing if you dont have a clue how to apply it? Its like being able to speak greek, but having no idea where greece is, nor how to get there. It all becomes usefull if u can apply the theory to make music from it.
#15
Quote by B&J
Whats the point of knowing if you dont have a clue how to apply it? Its like being able to speak greek, but having no idea where greece is, nor how to get there. It all becomes usefull if u can apply the theory to make music from it.

your analogy is flawed.

Learn what you want. But know that basically the reason you ask "why/do i need to learn this?" is because youre looking for a way out, a shortcut.

'Sweet! I dont have to waste my time learning triads and I can focus on shredding!11'

If you cannot figure out how to apply triads to music I think you should just quit now.

Are you telling me theyre out of dragons?
They never had dragons..
Who didnt?
The world..
GET THIS GUY OUT OF HERE, FIND ME A DRAGON
Last edited by glenthemann at Jul 6, 2010,
#16
Quote by B&J
Whats the point of knowing if you dont have a clue how to apply it? Its like being able to speak greek, but having no idea where greece is, nor how to get there. It all becomes usefull if u can apply the theory to make music from it.


that's a poor analogy. but your point is valid.

generally speaking, knowing theory is better for breaking down and analyzing other music than it is for writing your own. this is not to say that you can't write music using theory - i do it very often - but being able to break someone else's works down and really understand them is a more useful application for theory (though i do advise doing both).

so you already know that you need to apply whatever you learn -- why not just do it?
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#17
Quote by AeolianWolf
so you already know that you need to apply whatever you learn -- why not just do it?

Because he has to waste his time learning how

Are you telling me theyre out of dragons?
They never had dragons..
Who didnt?
The world..
GET THIS GUY OUT OF HERE, FIND ME A DRAGON
#18
Quote by glenthemann
your analogy is flawed.

Learn what you want. But know that basically the reason you ask "why/do i need to learn this?" is because youre looking for a way out, a shortcut.

'Sweet! I dont have to waste my time learning triads and I can focus on shredding!11'

If you cannot figure out how to apply triads to music I think you should just quit now.

thats bs, its not for nothing i decided to study theory. Are you even familiar with the Levine's Jazz Book? Because if you were, you would've know its layout, and the lack of exercizes. I dont see the problem is asking. You can never be too sure.
#19
Quote by AeolianWolf
if your knowledge of chords is limited to diatonic triads to the point that you consider them the same shit, then your knowledge of chords is extremely limited. i'd get on that.

playing only root notes doesn't get boring to you?


I play more than root notes, but what I'm saying asking is why are Chords different than any other set of notes? When I'm playing say G in Gmaj, and want to go to D, I can choose any of the 7 notes. Hell, I can even choose G again..
#20
Quote by Puppet_616
Firstly, this should probably belong in the bass forum
Secondly, and to answer your question, learning how to construct chords can help your bass playing, by allowing you to play notes OTHER than the root (or base note, if its an inversion) behind a given chord.
So take a Am chord. Instead of just playing the A, you can now know to play a C or an E note if you choose to.

It can also help with any solos you take, or bass fills.
There are other places it can help (such as tapping) but I'd say those are good places to start.


I know, but the question came about in this thread. Thus I asked it here. It's relevant to bass and all instruments.

See. That's what I don't get about Music Theory. Is all this is suppose to help but in the end it's all just saying, "Hey. Play whatever sounds good, even if you break every guideline." As I was saying, There's 7 other notes I can use instead of those three. Why do they have their own special name? Rid me of my stupidity.
#21
Quote by Pipwud
I play more than root notes, but what I'm saying asking is why are Chords different than any other set of notes? When I'm playing say G in Gmaj, and want to go to D, I can choose any of the 7 notes. Hell, I can even choose G again..


so basically what you're going to do is randomly play in key? that won't always sound good -- and what happens when it's time to modulate?

if you want to play a G under a Dmaj chord, i'm sure as hell not going to stop you; problem is you might make the harmony seem static.

how the music sounds is ultimately the most important thing, but people who say things like "music theory is a set of rules/guidelines that can be broken" generally know little more than basic theory. everything can be described using theory. everything. there is nothing objectively wrong.

i don't know about you, but i'd rather be knowledgeable than not.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#22
Quote by B&J
thats bs, its not for nothing i decided to study theory. Are you even familiar with the Levine's Jazz Book? Because if you were, you would've know its layout, and the lack of exercizes. I dont see the problem is asking. You can never be too sure.

Wait, you're reading one of the bibles of music theory and you're wondering why you should learn triads? Triads are one of the very bases of music.

Just learn them. It's not hard.
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#23
Quote by AeolianWolf
so basically what you're going to do is randomly play in key? that won't always sound good -- and what happens when it's time to modulate?

if you want to play a G under a Dmaj chord, i'm sure as hell not going to stop you; problem is you might make the harmony seem static.

how the music sounds is ultimately the most important thing, but people who say things like "music theory is a set of rules/guidelines that can be broken" generally know little more than basic theory. everything can be described using theory. everything. there is nothing objectively wrong.

i don't know about you, but i'd rather be knowledgeable than not.


That's what I'm asking you! I'm not the OP, i'm not saying there's no point in learning this and I'm not going to. I am in the process of trying to grasp all this. I've just hit a small picket fence with chords. I'm confused as to what is wrong the G under Dmaj chord. Get what I mean?
Are you saying G is the key or another chord being played? Either way, wouldn't it work? Dmaj Chord is D F# A which fits with Gmaj scale (having only the accidental of F#) and on the opposing side, Gmaj Chord G B D would fit with Dmaj scale because Dmaj scale's accidentals are F# and C#.

What I understand is that the Key filters out 7 chords that sound good together. Correct me if I'm wrong. But what I don't understand is what determines the chords you play? Say you're playing Gmaj Chord in the Key of Dmaj, what's next? It's especially confusing on bass because if there's a Chord change from Gmaj Chord to say Dmaj Chord, I'm essentially playing G and then switching it to D. What does a Chord do for me to help me spice that up? Again, I could choose any of the 7 notes to help me get to the Dmaj Chord from Gmaj Chord. Or am I wrong? Is there another factor I'm missing?

Please do rid me of my ignorance.
#24
Quote by Pipwud
That's what I'm asking you! I'm not the OP, i'm not saying there's no point in learning this and I'm not going to. I am in the process of trying to grasp all this. I've just hit a small picket fence with chords. I'm confused as to what is wrong the G under Dmaj chord. Get what I mean?
Are you saying G is the key or another chord being played? Either way, wouldn't it work? Dmaj Chord is D F# A which fits with Gmaj scale (having only the accidental of F#) and on the opposing side, Gmaj Chord G B D would fit with Dmaj scale because Dmaj scale's accidentals are F# and C#.

What I understand is that the Key filters out 7 chords that sound good together. Correct me if I'm wrong. But what I don't understand is what determines the chords you play? Say you're playing Gmaj Chord in the Key of Dmaj, what's next? It's especially confusing on bass because if there's a Chord change from Gmaj Chord to say Dmaj Chord, I'm essentially playing G and then switching it to D. What does a Chord do for me to help me spice that up? Again, I could choose any of the 7 notes to help me get to the Dmaj Chord from Gmaj Chord. Or am I wrong? Is there another factor I'm missing?

Please do rid me of my ignorance.


you're overlooking chord substitutions and mode mixture. what happens if you want a little spice and you want to use a chord not in the key? are you just going to randomly try chords until you get one that fits?

there's nothing wrong with playing a Dmaj/G. but the progression Gmaj - Dmaj - Gmaj will have more motion than Gmaj - Dmaj/G - Gmaj because the G is static.

as a bass player, your primary function generally doesn't involve chords. but you should still be well-versed in chords to know what you can do over them. when you get to playing more complex music like jazz, some blues and prog rock/metal, you won't encounter diatonic triads as much as you would in, say, pop and rock. if you ever compose, it will also come in handy. what happens if you ever want to write music for multiple voices?
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#25
Quote by AeolianWolf
you're overlooking chord substitutions and mode mixture. what happens if you want a little spice and you want to use a chord not in the key? are you just going to randomly try chords until you get one that fits?

there's nothing wrong with playing a Dmaj/G. but the progression Gmaj - Dmaj - Gmaj will have more motion than Gmaj - Dmaj/G - Gmaj because the G is static.

as a bass player, your primary function generally doesn't involve chords. but you should still be well-versed in chords to know what you can do over them. when you get to playing more complex music like jazz, some blues and prog rock/metal, you won't encounter diatonic triads as much as you would in, say, pop and rock. if you ever compose, it will also come in handy. what happens if you ever want to write music for multiple voices?


I'm asking you!

What's the difference between Gmaj and G? Gmaj Chord and just the G Note is what you're saying? I'm looking at this from the point of view of bass, single notes.. What I want to know and what you're not answering is how do I KNOW what progressions or series of notes to play? How do I know what to choose next when I'm at, say, Dmaj Chord (played on Bass as just D)?

That question still remains, but to ask another, I'll have to answer that one.

Let's say I go from Dmaj to Gmaj. That would sound decent?, but on bass that's only two notes. Where can I get these other notes from to make that more of a bass line rather than just playing two notes? How do I compile a series of notes that sounds good? Or rather, how do you?
Do you just go through the Scale and hit one Note and say "I like that" then continue to lurk that scale till you find another note and say "That goes good together." Or is there some logic when you hit one Note that says "Hey, Hey. You're at this note. That means you only have four other paths to go one. Which way do you want to go?" And is that something chords answer?

I know it's a very.. general question but that's where I'm stuck. I can't grasp how to make a good bass line. Pentatonics always sound good so I just play those with some different rhythms to get some "licks" or what have you.
#26
First of all, sorry for my english (i'm spanish)

Following the example of DMaj going to GMaj, yo can play on DMaj, for example, D, F# and A in the strong beats (1 & 3) and another notes of the scale (GMaj if it's a V-I movement) in the other beats. These notes (the triad of DMaj) will sound good, "consonant". If you play another notes (in the STRONG beats), then you will obtain different colors. For example, a C (the minor seventh), or a E. Some notes of the scale wil be very dissonant, like G over DMaj. Why? Because in many cases it will sound to the listener as if you were going to play F# and had done a mistake. That is because there is only one semitone between both notes. Then, you can't play a G over a DMaj? Yes, you can, but not in the first beat, if you don't want to be disonant. If that's your intention, then it's o.k.

In few words: The notes of the triad are the best (if you are trying to be "consonant") notes you can play in the strong beats.

Of course, when you learn more theory, you know there are a lot of exceptions. But the important thing is that you know too why do these exceptions exist and what are you going to obtain.
#27
Quote by Pipwud
I'm asking you!

What's the difference between Gmaj and G? Gmaj Chord and just the G Note is what you're saying? I'm looking at this from the point of view of bass, single notes.. What I want to know and what you're not answering is how do I KNOW what progressions or series of notes to play? How do I know what to choose next when I'm at, say, Dmaj Chord (played on Bass as just D)?

That question still remains, but to ask another, I'll have to answer that one.

Let's say I go from Dmaj to Gmaj. That would sound decent?, but on bass that's only two notes. Where can I get these other notes from to make that more of a bass line rather than just playing two notes? How do I compile a series of notes that sounds good? Or rather, how do you?
Do you just go through the Scale and hit one Note and say "I like that" then continue to lurk that scale till you find another note and say "That goes good together." Or is there some logic when you hit one Note that says "Hey, Hey. You're at this note. That means you only have four other paths to go one. Which way do you want to go?" And is that something chords answer?

I know it's a very.. general question but that's where I'm stuck. I can't grasp how to make a good bass line. Pentatonics always sound good so I just play those with some different rhythms to get some "licks" or what have you.


how do you know? you analyze the chords and choose which notes to play. that's it.

well, D down to G is a fifth - in a diatonic scale, you'd have those two notes and another three in in between. if you went up, it's a fourth - you'd have those two notes and two notes in between. you could run along the scale in either direction from D to get to G. you could realize that Dmaj -> Gmaj is a V-I, take advantage of that, and play only D and G. you could realize that there is an A in the Dmaj chord, and play an A under the Dmaj chord. you could do the same with F#. you could realize that there is a D in Gmaj, and play a D under both chords -- effectively playing a I (6/4 [second inversion]). all of these would bring about a different sound. there are a ton of things you can do.

chords can't answer anything for you. only you can answer that question.

but really, there's no wrong way to make a bassline. you can go at it however you want. understanding chords can only make you realize options you might not have thought of before.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#28
Quote by AeolianWolf
how do you know? you analyze the chords and choose which notes to play. that's it.

well, D down to G is a fifth - in a diatonic scale, you'd have those two notes and another three in in between. if you went up, it's a fourth - you'd have those two notes and two notes in between. you could run along the scale in either direction from D to get to G. you could realize that Dmaj -> Gmaj is a V-I, take advantage of that, and play only D and G. you could realize that there is an A in the Dmaj chord, and play an A under the Dmaj chord. you could do the same with F#. you could realize that there is a D in Gmaj, and play a D under both chords -- effectively playing a I (6/4 [second inversion]). all of these would bring about a different sound. there are a ton of things you can do.

chords can't answer anything for you. only you can answer that question.

but really, there's no wrong way to make a bassline. you can go at it however you want. understanding chords can only make you realize options you might not have thought of before.



Thank you.