#1
Alright...after finishing up my AP Music Theory Class and letting that info gel a little bit I'm pretty confident in my music theory knowledge. I know all the cadences (plagal, authentic, w/e), I know the major/minor scales, I'm pretty solid at identifying appoggiaturas/suspensions/non-harmonic tones/etc., I know my intervals, and I've exhausted all the resources on musictheory.net. What next? I don't have my teacher around to direct me anymore, so I was hoping some of the experts on this forum would help me out. My weakness is modes, and although I understand how they work I'm pretty slow at determining which mode is used in a song and I'm having trouble finding a site that'll help me...I also suck at hearing but I'm working on that, so no worries there.

Basically what should I learn next?
#2
Quote by justaramsfan
Alright...after finishing up my AP Music Theory Class and letting that info gel a little bit I'm pretty confident in my music theory knowledge. I know all the cadences (plagal, authentic, w/e), I know the major/minor scales, I'm pretty solid at identifying appoggiaturas/suspensions/non-harmonic tones/etc., I know my intervals, and I've exhausted all the resources on musictheory.net. What next? I don't have my teacher around to direct me anymore, so I was hoping some of the experts on this forum would help me out. My weakness is modes, and although I understand how they work I'm pretty slow at determining which mode is used in a song and I'm having trouble finding a site that'll help me...I also suck at hearing but I'm working on that, so no worries there.

Basically what should I learn next?


^ spend quality time with the stuff that you just learned in class.

learn to HEAR it. Otherwise all you have are fancy words.
shred is gaudy music
#3
Quote by GuitarMunky
^ spend quality time with the stuff ya just learned in class.

learn to HEAR it. Otherwise all you have are fancy words.


I mentioned I'm working on that already
#4
Simply study music. If you come across something you don't understand try to learn about it. I like to do a lot of harmonic analysis. Also if you learn to play by ear/transcribe, then that will help your relative pitch enormously. You're at the point where you have a solid basis of knowledge, you just need to apply it in a practical situation in order to build upon it.

I suggest trying your hand at composition as well (if you haven't already, that is). There's a lot to learn about messing around with progressions and melodies (even if you're just noodling). Work on improvisation if that's something you'd like to get better at.

One more thing: I suggest you don't worry too much about modes at the moment. If you would like to learn about modal music, great, but there's so much to learn within the tonal realm, and even within simply the major and minor scales.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jul 3, 2010,
#5
Quote by justaramsfan
I mentioned I'm working on that already


Yeah but it has to be emphasized.

Apart from that, you finally know the basics so it's time to branch out from there depending on what you want to do with music. So...

What do you want to do with music?
#6
Quote by food1010
Simply study music. If you come across something you don't understand try to learn about it. Also if you learn to play by ear/transcribe, then that will help your relative pitch enormously.

I suggest trying your hand at composition as well (if you haven't already, that is). There's a lot to learn about messing around with progressions and melodies (even if you're just noodling). Work on improvisation if that's something you'd like to get better at.


This is a little more direct, thank you...my 2 weaknesses are modulation/identifying modes. Are there any resources on this site/other sites you could link me to?
#7
Quote by justaramsfan
This is a little more direct, thank you...my 2 weaknesses are modulation/identifying modes. Are there any resources on this site/other sites you could link me to?
I edited my first post, I suggest you reread it, as it addresses the mode issue.

Pillo raises a good point: In order for us to help you, you probably need to explain to us what you want to get out of theory and where you want to progress in music.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#8
Quote by Pillo114
Yeah but it has to be emphasized.

Apart from that, you finally know the basics so it's time to branch out from there depending on what you want to do with music. So...

What do you want to do with music?


Interesting question...I just like knowing a lot about it I suppose because it'll help me keep gigs. I'm primarily a drummer/violinist so very little of this stuff has practical application, but I'm also the near music coordinator at my church so I generally use what I know to write out guitar parts/write out chords based on the piano music I have to compliment it...

EDIT: And I really do want to understand modes...I know the major/minor scales like the back of my hand almost, since I've been reading them for like 10 years. Music theory helped me learn how all this stuff I already knew worked together
Last edited by justaramsfan at Jul 3, 2010,
#9
Jam ... a lot. Using the different modes and you will soon hear all the differences in them.
#10
Transcribe a lot, or at least listen a lot. Any time you hear anything you can't immediately identify, work it out, then look at how and why it works. AP Music Theory won't teach you anything about hearing chord progressions, especially tonal quirks particular to more modern music.