#1
It seems like it never gets checked by people that can actually help anymore, which is understandable with how old it is and I was wondering if there was anything we could do about this problem. It might be better to have something like an EQing guide (if there isn't already) or something like that instead of just giving out settings.
Guitars:
LTD F-50
Yamaha EG-112
'77 Harmony
Roadworn Starcaster
Gretsch G5120

Amps:
Vypyr 15
Epiphone Valve Junior combo
#3
Turn the dials on your amp until it sounds good.

Remember those settings.

1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
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Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#4
I have bumped it and still nothin
Guitars:
LTD F-50
Yamaha EG-112
'77 Harmony
Roadworn Starcaster
Gretsch G5120

Amps:
Vypyr 15
Epiphone Valve Junior combo
#5
It is just the way it is. If everyone was allowed to ask settings questions they would have to set up a whole new sub-forum. Too many questions and the answer is usally the same.

Answer: Every amp is different and every gear set up is different. I don't understand why people can't dial in the tone they want by their ear. For example. The settings for Red Hot Chili Peppers tone on a Fender will be different than on a Marshall.

We have a Tone Testing Thread that might give you some pointers. You can also ask in the Technique forum or maybe post in an 'Only X Amp Thread' where your question might be more pertinent.
#6
Just set everything to noon and go from there. If you don't know what a frequency band sounds like, mess around with that particular knob for a while to get a feel for it.
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

WTLT

(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
#7
An amp is not an Atari, there's no secret code that you can put in to make it sound good. The settings thread is minimally useful not because it's rarely used, but because EQing varies too much between rigs to have one-size-fits-all answers, and is not really something you can teach.

It's just like when you first started playing and had no idea what sounded good, so you turned the gain all the way up. Nobody could teach you to hear better tone, but it happened over time as your ear developed. Once you spend enough time with a range of amps and EQ settings, you'll be able to EQ by ear far better than we could instruct you to over the internet.