#1
I have a guy wanting to trade a Marshall Mode 4 1/2 stack for my 2000(year) Marshall 1987x(model name) 50 watt plexi-reissue head(cab was traded off months ago) And he want ME to give him 200 dollars for this to be a done deal.

Now, for those that are considering my issue, here, based on monetary value alone. My 1987x(used and in great condition) sells for $1000-$1,500 U.S. dollars. And I think the mode 4 1/2stack(used) sells for around 500ish dollars.

For those that are basing their decisions on tone, The 1987x is basically the same as the 100 watt plexi's of the 60-70's, but is only 50 watts. And I have no idea, other than the crappy demo's on youtube, what the mode 4 sounds like exactly.

Here's the deal, I am not so much worried about the monetary value of each head, but there are 3 ways I can considering going about this;

1. Sell my head and buy a mode 4 1/2stack. (this takes the longest. I have had it on ebay twice and no one bought it. =T )

2. Make the trade ONLY if no money is involved.

3. Make the trade and include 100 dollars, like he is asking, for me not having the
matching cab.


what should I do here?
#2
Apparently the Mode 4 is overpriced and not that good, why do you wanna sell your 1987x?
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#3
Sell the cab yourself.

Buy the cab you want.

Do not let impatience affect your finances.
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#4
Quote by Jak Archer
Apparently the Mode 4 is overpriced and not that good, why do you wanna sell your 1987x?


I don't really want to sell it. I like it very much, but I play in a band and the 1987x is fine for smaller venues, but the Sturgis Rally is coming up, and I need a bigger, more powerful amp.
#5
Quote by charles_ebarb
I don't really want to sell it. I like it very much, but I play in a band and the 1987x is fine for smaller venues, but the Sturgis Rally is coming up, and I need a bigger, more powerful amp.


How is a 1987x not powerfull enough!!
It should be plenty loud for anything
#6
Wait a minute.

He wants your Marshall 50-Watt Plexi Reissue Head, in addition to 200 hundred dollars? And in exchange for those, he will give a Marshall Mode Four head and 4x12 cab (making a halfstack)?

Why in the name of God are you even thinking about this? The Mode Four is trash, and the Plexi is not my favorite amp but well above the MF.
Quote by charles_ebarb
I don't really want to sell it. I like it very much, but I play in a band and the 1987x is fine for smaller venues, but the Sturgis Rally is coming up, and I need a bigger, more powerful amp.

No you don't. I promise. It is more than powerful enough for any gig. Ever.
Last edited by Flying Couch at Jul 3, 2010,
#7
dont get the mode four the plexi
the 50 watts plenty powerful enough for just about anything
#8
Wait a minute.

He wants your Marshall 50-Watt Plexi Reissue Head, in addition to 200 hundred dollars? And in exchange for those, he will give a Marshall Mode Four head and 4x12 cab (making a halfstack)?

Why in the name of God are you even thinking about this? The Mode Four is trash, and the Plexi is not my favorite amp but well above the MF.

Yes it is. I promise. It is more than powerful enough for any gig. Ever.

This. The 1987x completely blows away the mode 4, and believe me 50 watts is plently for ANY venue. Need more volume mic it up (which I doubt you will need to do).

By the way a 100 watt head is only 10% louder than a 50 watt amp. Just FYI.
Last edited by JayLacelle at Jul 3, 2010,
#9
Your head should be plenty loud enough, but even if it isn't, if this gig is that big a venue surely they'll have a PA system so You can mic it?
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#10
Quote by Sguit
How is a 1987x not powerfull enough!!
It should be plenty loud for anything



it is loud for the smaller stuff. but it is competing against a BV120 1/2stack, and in terms of volume, I am barely being heard. But the sound quality is just amazing.

and the 1987x has very little headroom, which I absolutely love, but I need to get a 100 watt or higher. and the mode 4 is overkill, but the guy is will to part with it.. ( I figured they were total trash by the fact that Marshall only made them available for about 6 months in the U.S.)

I have tried to sell the 1987x on ebay....twice and my asking price is 1 grand. (500 dollars lower than the fair market value) and no one even asked any questions about it.
So, the other guitarist in my band introduced me to a guy, locally and he's got a mode 4.

And now that I have started to hear you guys' opinion on the mode 4, I may just tell him to "get lost" and keep my 1987x! =)

Thanks guys for your help!
#12
you have to be retarded to trade one of the good marshalls for a solidstate marshall

keep the 1987x
#14
Quote by charles_ebarb
but it is competing against a BV120 1/2stack, and in terms of volume, I am barely being heard


You're doing something very VERY wrong!
#15
Quote by charles_ebarb
scratch that... I WILL tell that guy to get lost!

This is a good move. But you say you're having trouble hearing. What are you playing? How loud? How are you EQing the amp? How is the cab positioned?
#16
Quote by iampeter
maybe he needs more volume for his scooped sound to cut through



I do have a scooped tone but is more like this;


bass; 6

mids; 3

treble 9

and what is happening is that I am getting entirely too much feedback, with the amount of treble I have. I have a noisegate, too. I guess I should just increase the threshold some more.

but, yea, you are on the right track with why I need a 100 watt.
#17
op you need to relearn how sound works. you're competing against a bv half stack? i'm so confused your amp should be louder then hell or you're doing it wrong.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#18
Quote by charles_ebarb
I do have a scooped tone but is more like this;


bass; 6

mids; 3

treble 9

and what is happening is that I am getting entirely too much feedback, with the amount of treble I have. I have a noisegate, too. I guess I should just increase the threshold some more.

but, yea, you are on the right track with why I need a 100 watt.


you are a fail.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#19
Quote by charles_ebarb
I do have a scooped tone but is more like this;


bass; 6

mids; 3

treble 9

and what is happening is that I am getting entirely too much feedback, with the amount of treble I have. I have a noisegate, too. I guess I should just increase the threshold some more.

but, yea, you are on the right track with why I need a 100 watt.

Turn your mids up. The bass part of your sound is being swallowed by the bassist and lower drums, and your highs are being drowned out by the higher drums and cymbals. Guitars are midrange instruments and need that range to be heard; what you're doing is about equivalent with a bassist turning the bass control on his amp way down.

My advice on EQing tube amps: nothing should be below %50 except volume. I would try:

Treble: 7- 10
Mids: 5 - 6
Bass: 7 - 10

There are lots of things that can cause feedback.
#21
Quote by Flying Couch

My advice on EQing tube amps: nothing should be below %50 except volume.



Tell that to Eric Johnson.

I kinda like my amp with the bass at 2, mids at noon, and treble at 4.
but for a plexi ish amp, i'd say everything at noon and the mids at 8 would be awesome
#22
Just turn everything to 10 and be super br00t4l. The amp you have is one of the few where that actually sounds good.
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#23
Turn up your mids, simple as that. You're probably fine for volume but mids are essential to be heard amongst other instruments.
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#24
Quote by Flying Couch
Turn your mids up. The bass part of your sound is being swallowed by the bassist and lower drums, and your highs are being drowned out by the higher drums and cymbals. Guitars are midrange instruments and need that range to be heard; what you're doing is about equivalent with a bassist turning the bass control on his amp way down.

My advice on EQing tube amps: nothing should be below %50 except volume. I would try:

Treble: 7- 10
Mids: 5 - 6
Bass: 7 - 10

There are lots of things that can cause feedback.



You are right. I think I end up running a scooped mids tone, at the house. because I am used to playing by myself,,, without a bassist, or drums.
#25
Quote by charles_ebarb
You are right. I think I end up running a scooped mids tone, at the house. because I am used to playing by myself,,, without a bassist, or drums.


In addition to what FlyingCouch and JayLacelle said, bear in mind that each of the knobs on your amp essentially acts as an attenuator. In other words, without active tone controls, all you're doing is controlling the frequency specific gain that is governed by each knob. By scooping your mids so much, you're attenuating the frequencies that guitars depend on to cut through a live mix. Depending on where you have your presence control, you may want to edge that up a little bit as well.
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#26
Quote by ibz_bucket
In addition to what FlyingCouch and JayLacelle said, bear in mind that each of the knobs on your amp essentially acts as an attenuator. In other words, without active tone controls, all you're doing is controlling the frequency specific gain that is governed by each knob. By scooping your mids so much, you're attenuating the frequencies that guitars depend on to cut through a live mix. Depending on where you have your presence control, you may want to edge that up a little bit as well.



I tried this last night.

I actually did cut right thru the mix. Now, I see where a "tubescreamer" would come in handy. Looks like I am selling my MT-2 metalzone pedal. This pedal is cool, but it is really only used for an amp with plenty of headroom. (playing clean tones at high volume) I think I will sell it to the other guitarist, since he is playing thru my bv-120.
#27
Quote by AcousticMirror
you are a fail.


Yet another unnecessarily abusive post from AcousticMirror.
#28
truth hurts sometimes. other people already adequately explained why those settings are fail.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#31
Quote by charles_ebarb
I don't really want to sell it. I like it very much, but I play in a band and the 1987x is fine for smaller venues, but the Sturgis Rally is coming up, and I need a bigger, more powerful amp.

Charles, meet the Sure SM57 running into the PA system. It will amplify the output of your amplifier by many times, and spread the sound across the stage more evenly, allowing you to play your 50 watt amp in bigger venues.
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

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Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

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#32
Quote by GURREN LAGANN
Yet another unnecessarily abusive post from AcousticMirror.



ahhh, I don't really worry about AcousticMirror, nor his abusive comments. I have seen other posts of his. He usually says things like that because he just like to see his computer monitor paste, right in his face, what he really is in RL.

I have learned to ignore him
#33
Quote by Shinozoku
Charles, meet the Sure SM57 running into the PA system. It will amplify the output of your amplifier by many times, and spread the sound across the stage more evenly, allowing you to play your 50 watt amp in bigger venues.



I have tried this before, maybe I wasn't using the proper mic last time, or had the mic too close to the speakers.
#34
Quote by charles_ebarb
ahhh, I don't really worry about AcousticMirror, nor his abusive comments. I have seen other posts of his. He usually says things like that because he just like to see his computer monitor paste, right in his face, what he really is in RL.

I have learned to ignore him


you did post a thread with a title of "am I retarded???????" correct?
were you not prepared for the possibility that the answer would be affirmative to a question you yourself posed?

check it out out I found this in the big ass sticky at the top of this forum regarding your eq settings.


What do those knobs do?


originally posted by Dave_Mc:

Treble: This affects the high frequencies in your sound. Turn it down for a softer, warmer sound, and up for a sharper, more piercing/cutting sound.

Middle: Affects the mid range in your tone. Turn it down to ?scoop? your mids for a hollow/metal type tone, or turn it up for a fuller tone. (Note: some amps have a ?contour? knob, rather than mids- this is sometimes (but not always) the inverse of the mid knob- I.e. Mid=10 = Contour = 0 etc.- you need to use your ears in this case). The guitar is commonly called a mid range instrument, and this means that the majority of the notes it produces falls into this range. Thus, if you turn this knob down, you may have trouble being heard, or 'cutting through.'

Bass: Affects the low frequencies in your tone. Turn it up for more ?oomph? in your sound, or turn it down for a more trebly tone. It's a good idea not to turn this up too much or your tone will start fighting with the bassist's

Gain/drive/pre-gain: Controls the amount of overdrive or distortion in your sound.

(Master) Volume/Post-gain: Controls how loud you are. Some amps also have channel volume controls, where you can independently set a volume for each channel.

Depth punch/depth boost/resonance/deep etc.: Increases the bass response in your sound.

Presence: Affects the upper harmonics (ie. higher than treble).

Bright: increases the treble frequencies, to give a more ?sparkly? tone. Normally found on clean channels.

Scoop/Tone Shift/Contour (all push-buttons): Normally presets the mids to a very low level, to give you an instant metal tone.

Boost: Normally either increases the overdrive/distortion or volume by a preset amount.

Reverb: Mimics the echoes of being in a room/hall/cave where the sound REVERBerates around the walls.

Note that not all of these might be on your amp, or your amp may have a different name for them, or indeed, you may have more knobs on your amp.

The best way to discover what your knobs do, is to tweak them.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
Last edited by AcousticMirror at Jul 5, 2010,