#1
I don't know how to create a solo when I'm playing with a backing track or with another person. I have tried to memorize scales, but I forget them when I'm improvising. I know about three or four licks that I use in soloing. But whenever I learn a new one, I'll forget it. Why am I doing this? Why can't I remember the stuff that I know when I'm trying to solo?
#2
It just takes a hell of a lot of practice, keep going over your scale patterns until you can remember then and learn licks from other players, listen to the blues as well and try and figure out what people are playing by ear. Just keep at it and don't give up. This website is good www.justinguitar.com
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#3
Well, as long as you are in the right key/scale, first up you should care about ending on the root note. Its about rhythm and being in sync with the drummer/backing/metronome. In between, you should employ little techniques like a triplet or bends or hammer-ons n pull-offs.

Start slowly with like pentatonics n such. Get used to the 5 notes, then you can move towards the 7 note scales.
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#4
Quote by MonsterOfRock
Start slowly with like pentatonics n such. Get used to the 5 notes, then you can move towards the 7 note scales.


I thought it was always best to start off with learning the major scales....
#5
Look, no matter what you play, Guthrie Govan has done it already, so you might as well just whip out yer dick onstage.
#6
learn the pentatonics (mainly pattern 3)

really easy
#7
Train your ear (identifying in which root the song is, ientify which scales are being used to solo over a chord progression, identifying chords,...), if you do this it will be much easier.
#8
Quote by '93
learn the pentatonics (mainly pattern 3)

really easy

What use is that?

The ability to improvise is dependent on your ability to think music and your ability to then translate what's in your head to your instrument.

If there's no ideas in your head to start with then nothing's ever going to come from your guitar.
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#9
For your question about improvising... Try different ways to write out solos with the scales you know. Dont just stick to improvising on the guitar on your down time. Try writing some things on a blank tab sheet, pen and paper... try listening to songs and trying to identify what they're using or doing. Identify how you learn the best... sight, hearing, ect ect. and use that to your advantage. For example.. if sight is how you learn the best, watching videos and doing the blank tab thing can help because you're actually seeing what you're doing.
#10
Watch Marty Friedman's Melodic Control. It's a great video by a great guitarist that demonstrates the use of chord tones. Chord tones are the single most reliable way to play solid solos. It's the way jazz musicians have soloed since Louis Armstrong.
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#11
The problem with me is that I will run just sections of the scale up and down because I can't think fast enough, or I will forget the scale all together. How do I overcome this?
#12
Quote by Rockabilly1956
The problem with me is that I will run just sections of the scale up and down because I can't think fast enough, or I will forget the scale all together. How do I overcome this?

A lot of practice and rote memorization, unfortunately. There are no shortcuts.
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#13
The ability to improvise is dependent on your ability to think music and your ability to then translate what's in your head to your instrument.
Although, I most agree with you...most improv involves just recycling the licks you know. Even the best players usually just wriggle their fingers around. But I suppose the music could still be coming from within somewhere.
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#14
Quote by Rockabilly1956
The problem with me is that I will run just sections of the scale up and down


I have a similar problem sometimes.
#15
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Watch Marty Friedman's Melodic Control.
Thanks for sharing that! I've been looking for something to help me start taking my improv to the next level without getting too technical into the theory and without being too simplistic, and that was perfect!
#16
Run up, run down, go back to 'up' and add some bendy vibrato while stepping on a delay pedal just before it happens.

Yay solo....
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#17
Quote by Rockabilly1956
The problem with me is that I will run just sections of the scale up and down because I can't think fast enough, or I will forget the scale all together. How do I overcome this?


Try thinking of the scale in terms of intervals instead of just patterns you have to memorize all over the guitar. For example the major scale is a simple formula of WWHWWWH (W=whole step=2 frets and H=half step=1 fret) which you can apply anywhere on the guitar without memorizing any shapes. To get the minor scale start on the sixth note so it would be WHWWHWW.
#18
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Watch Marty Friedman's Melodic Control. It's a great video by a great guitarist that demonstrates the use of chord tones. Chord tones are the single most reliable way to play solid solos. It's the way jazz musicians have soloed since Louis Armstrong.


Ha, I was gonna post this myself. Great video, you can learn a lot from that.
#19
Quote by turtlewax
most improv involves just recycling the licks you know.


not if it's good improv. that's not to say that recycling licks isn't good, but the players whose main method of improv is lick recycling are generally not good at improvisation.
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#20
Quote by Rockabilly1956
The problem with me is that I will run just sections of the scale up and down because I can't think fast enough, or I will forget the scale all together. How do I overcome this?

So you need to slow down then - there's no easy way round it. It takes time to absorb information and be able to use it effectively.

Slow down, forget trying to play fast or flashy and focus on the melody you're creating and how it affects yor harmony.
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#22
i agree with with the ppl who say slow. There is no reason to go insanly fast most of it sounds dumb anyway. DO this. Learn ur blues pent just reg pent with added notes. And start slow and just let ur fingers go. Hear it in ur head. Listen to bb king, jimi hendrix, clapton,albert king, jonny winter,freddy king. Hear there scales and notes.

Now make your own. It takes lots of practice. Learn every technique they have. Trills,vibrato,ho po, bends. Bends with vibrato are my fav.and just let it go. Its hard to explain into words.

Also the most important thing is to mem your scales at least the patterns to start. Then the notes. Its kinda like riding a bike with training wheels. shapes are the training wheels and memorizing the notes of the scales is takeing off the training wheels. Um i cant really think of anything else. Learn the people that i mentions licks.
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#23
not if it's good improv. that's not to say that recycling licks isn't good, but the players whose main method of improv is lick recycling are generally not good at improvisation.


I suppose I didn't mean it quite like that. Like sure you have to make up new music on the spot. But you at least pad it with signature licks, go listen to Buddy Guy, he plays the same thing everytime
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#24
Quote by Rockabilly1956
The problem with me is that I will run just sections of the scale up and down because I can't think fast enough, or I will forget the scale all together. How do I overcome this?


Honestly, and no idea why no-one said this - don't play when you're out of ideas, just stop.

Sure, you may end up with more space than solo, but lots of people dig that. You don't have to "fill" every bar with notes.

And as for forgetting the scale - practice will help.

And for coming up with more ideas - try to come up with ideas without involving the guitar or scales at all. Just imagine the music/solo you want, and then figure out how to create it with the guitar.