#1
So i've been told and i've read around that its a bad idea to mix and match different companies' power supplies for different pedals, so I was wondering what power supplies I should get for the following pedals:

From right to left:

-Robert Keeley Ibanez TS9 Baked Mod
-Crest Audio Fuzz Face (not applicable because it doesn't have an AC Adapter port yet)
-Marshall Shredmaster
-VOX 847A Wah
-Dunlop TS-1 Tremolo
-Boss DD-7
-Ibanez CS9 Stereo Chorus
-Digitech Hardwire RV-7 Stereo Reverb

I also own a Boss BF-3 Flanger, and a Boss PH-3 Phase Shifter pedal.

I'm still also working out how to arrange the end portion of my rig, and I intend on adding some Boss Expression pedals, a TU-3 to the beginning of the chain, and some other pedals.

But yeah, i've been running on batteries for a while since I have no idea what power supplies I should and/or am supposed to use.
Last edited by plague o' death at Jul 4, 2010,
#2
jim dunlop dc brick, voodoo labs pedal power

avoid daisy chains such as the one spot as you will experience a voltage drop the further you move down the chain.
Last edited by ibanezgod1973 at Jul 4, 2010,
#3
Don't believe everything you hear. I've been using a Danelectro power supply for my Boss ME-50 for like five years now, absolutely no problems whatsoever. But, like the other guy said, if you need something for your 97 pedals you got there, get something like a DC Brick, and stay away from the chain types. There's a reason for the price difference.
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Last edited by HavokStrife at Jul 4, 2010,
#5
I heard from a guy at Guitar Center that as long as I pay attention to right voltage, and don't use the wrong ones, there's no problem with mixing and matching voltages.

As far as I know, all of my pedals have run on 9v batteries, so is it safe to say I should stick with 9v supplies unless otherwise noted?

Also, thank you for all the help, keep 'em coming. Lord knows batteries aren't cutting it, especially when my DD-7 drinks them like tiny apple juice boxes.
#6
i just got a 1spot and am very surprised how quiet it is. no noise at all and everything runs just fine
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#7
the dc brick has 7 9volt outputs and 3 18volt outputs it`s also worth checking the polarity on the pedals you have ( +ve on the outside is common but check as there will inevitably be a few that will be -ve on the outside)
#8
Quote by nightraven
yep, your pedals all run off 9vdc
you said the fuzzface didn't have a 9v input "yet", i wouldn't advise building one in, fuzzfaces sound better from a battery, and i'm not into pedal circuitry or anything but the fuzzface has a positive ground so you can't daisy chain it together with any of the other pedals (not that that would matter if you get a power supply with isolated outputs, like the bbe supa charger or voodoo lab pp2+ or t-rex fuel tank chameleon). fuzzfaces draw so little current if you remember to unplug the input jack when you're done playing guitar the battery will last years. you could put a power switch on the pedal to disconnect the battery when you're done playing which'll be easier than unplugging stuff, and i think you'll be able to still have your signal go through the pedal when it's bypassed even if the power switch is off.


Regarding my Fuzz Face, actually what I do after I play, and not just with that one, is take it apart and pull out the battery everytime, and then when I wanna play or use it, I pop it back in.

I've thought about sending it to Analog Man to get an AC jack installed, but I still don't like the idea because its still kind of a rare pedal, and though i've bought the Jimi Hendrix model as a back-up, even that one would lose its resale value from doing that kind of surgery.

It doesn't draw that much even with the battery inside, as long as I unplug the input jack? Hmmm, i'll try that. Tell me more about that power switch idea, because that also sounds good too.

On the subject of signal and bypass, i've been wondering this, if my pedals aren't all true-bypass, and they don't have power running them, the signal won't travel straight from the guitar to amp, regardless, right? Because that's another thing, sometimes I get lazy and just decide i'll play clean, and then I have to fiddle with my cables because nothing is coming out
#9
Quote by nightraven
!??!?!?!?
the DC brick IS a daisy chain type

This. It doesn't use isolated outputs.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#10
Quote by plague o' death

On the subject of signal and bypass, i've been wondering this, if my pedals aren't all true-bypass, and they don't have power running them, the signal won't travel straight from the guitar to amp, regardless, right? Because that's another thing, sometimes I get lazy and just decide i'll play clean, and then I have to fiddle with my cables because nothing is coming out


Right. A buffered pedal needs power for it to bypass the signal or else it'll die in the circuitry so to speak. Some pedals aren't true bypass or buffered, but those are much more rare these days.


Also, yes, you could put a power switch in there, a SPST, on the wire of either one of the battery terminals. However, this would still require mounting the switch on the body somehow, which is a cosmetic change which I think that you said you didn't wanna do.

Right now I'm running my pedals through a voltage regulator circuit powered by a 1.8a 12v adaptor I found... case in point is that it works and it isn't one of those expensive supplies you can find. Really, there isn't anything that you're "supposed" to use but try that one-spot, it works pretty well.

Also anything that uses a 9v battery uses 9VDC so yeah you're safe with that.
"Experience is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you." - Aldous Huxley
Last edited by Zamorak at Jul 4, 2010,
#11
Quote by Zamorak
Some pedals aren't true bypass or buffered, but those are much more rare these days.

Wait, could you please explain this a little more? What are they then ?
#12
Quote by Harmonicer
Wait, could you please explain this a little more? What are they then ?


Something a little bit in-between. Take for example the original MXR Phase 90. The switch on this only switched the output signal... so as a result when it was in bypass mode (I.E. phaser off) it sucked tone because it was running the signal through the circuitry without a buffer at the input stage. It basically like having a buffered pedal without the buffer in it, which is where a lot of tone sucking can occur because you have the weaker guitar signal going through all of that wiring. The effect is less noticeable if you have pedals placed before it that are active, but when placed at the beginning of a change it was much more noticeable. Like I said, modern pedals probably don't even use this form anymore, and I know that MXR started adding the buffer stage sometime around 1990.
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Last edited by Zamorak at Jul 4, 2010,
#13
Quote by ibanezgod1973
jim dunlop dc brick, voodoo labs pedal power

avoid daisy chains such as the one spot as you will experience a voltage drop the further you move down the chain.


You're saying to avoid daisy chains, but the DC Brick is a $99 glorified daisy chain in a box format w/ a bigger wallwart than any other daisy chain out there. PP2+ or any isolated imput power supply is what you want. Just make sure you're power supply has the correct voltages you need as well as the mA.
#15
i am very happy with my bbe supa charger. its great with eliminating the sound or excessive buzz, and powers all eight pedals i have hooked up to it well. seems reliable too. paid $99 with free shipping and warranty on the 'bay.
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#16
As long as you get the polarity and voltage correct and the supply can source the sum of the durrent draws of each pedal you will be fine. However, if one or more of you pedals use a positive ground as somebody claims one of yours has (that's positive ground internally, not how the socket is wired) then those pedals need to be on their own supply. The manufacturer will normally warn you somewhere if it's positive ground, it's rare but it does happen.
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#17
sorry to barge in but my question in related and doesnt warrant its own thread. really its more of a reiteration for personal clarification. a pedal can use any ac adapter that complies with its voltage and polarity, correct?
#18
Yes. but make sure that the adapter has enough output or else you'll blow the adapter by using it with the pedal.
"Experience is not what happens to you. It is what you do with what happens to you." - Aldous Huxley
#19
unplugging the input cables works wonders as far as saving batteries. Mine last forever in my TS and my wah.


Still, 9V batteries are like $5 each, which is brutal.
#20
Good lord you must be dropping alot of cash on batteries. I'd suggest staying away from the Dunlop DC Brick; it's a little cheaper than it's BBE and Voodoolabs compatriots, but the lack of isolated outputs cause some pedals such as my Planet Waves Tuner to hum when activated.