#1
Hey

I`m in a improvising rut. I seem to be playing the same licks and it gets boring.
Also I have a doubt with how I can move up and down the fretboard when improvising, because I hace noticed that when people improvise they don`t just stay in the same scale, they move up and down the fretboard. How? do they play different scales or modes or arpeggios? Also is improvising like composition?
Breakin` the Law!
#3
You've got to learn the scales all over the fret board. Learn the shapes of the major scale and the minor/major pentatonic. But don't rely on shapes. Learning what a scale is, how it's built and how it related to other concepts will vastly improve your understanding of music and will help with your improvising.

Also, learn some solos/licks from a range of guitarists to give you musical examples of scales they use and their type of phrasing.

Lastly,

Improvising: Thinking it up on the spot

Composing: Writing it out beforehand
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#4
Well, they're right, you don't stay within the same scale.
The chords within a song change, and with those chords, a good soloist will also change note selection.
For example, the chords to 'Fly Me to the Moon,' the classic Frank Sinatra song, the chords in Eb Major will go Cm7, Fm7, Bb7, Eb7, Ab7, Ddim, Gm7, Cm7, F7, Bb7, Eb7, C7, Fm7, Bb7, Eb7, Ddim.
Harmonically, if you stayed within Eb Major, you wouldn't sound necessarily bad, but it would be pretty boring. So in Eb Major, we have three flats, Bb, Eb, and Ab. Cm7 fits over this perfectly. When you get to Fm7 with four flats, Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, the Db is the odd note out, but by no means is it not usable. The next chord, Bb7, has three flats, Bb, Eb, Ab, and again, it kind of just works with Eb major.
What I'm trying to get at is that you should know the notes within the scale of each chord change within a song and you will get far more interesting solos.
Of course, memorizing the fretboard helps, but also memorize the patterns of the fretboard are, where each interval can be found, what shapes are movable, etc. and use that within your soloing.
I highly recommend getting involved in some sort of jazz group.
It's like Superman reading the teachings of Jesus. The two greatest musicians on Earth hath combined forces. I officially quit music, as it has reached it's zenith with that cover.
#5
Quote by rasta_mon
Hey

I`m in a improvising rut. I seem to be playing the same licks and it gets boring.
Also I have a doubt with how I can move up and down the fretboard when improvising, because I hace noticed that when people improvise they don`t just stay in the same scale, they move up and down the fretboard. How? do they play different scales or modes or arpeggios? Also is improvising like composition?


Here's a vid that might help you
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_7DgCrziI8