#1
1. Should i start learning 3 finger technique right off the bat, or should I start with 2 fingers?

2. what is a cheap commonly found bass amp? (~$100 used range)

3. Should I use wandering thumb technique, or use my fret hand to mute? And if i use 3 fingers, do i mute with my pinky then?

I want to chose the techniques that will limit me as little as possible as I get better, and my ultimate goal would be to play highly technical pieces (but thats years away at this point). Right now i have a 4 string bass, but Eventually i want to get a 5 or 6 string
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#2
1. Learn to play with both 2 fingers and 3. 2 for starters I'd say

2. Don't know.

3. Use the one most comfortable to you.

I'm not a bassist, but the more ways you can play the same thing the better.
#3
1. Practice 2 fingers, 3 fingers and with a pick. No reason to limit yourself to just one

2. Can't help here

3. I use both my hands for string muting.
#4
1. practise with whatever feels best, some people are more comfortable with 2 fingers, some 3, some use their thumb and some use a pick

2. My friend uses a Behringer BT108 and that sounds fairy decent for a low price amp.

3. I use my fretting hand for string muting, as your technique improves you find that muting the lower strings when playing the higher ones isn't need so much.
Le Sraah
#5
just saying... there's no point in learning to play with 3 fingers. 2 all the way, dude!
#6
Quote by eddynator
just saying... there's no point in learning to play with 3 fingers. 2 all the way, dude!


Triplets are far easier to play with 3 instead of 2 fingers.

There's a point for you right there.
Posted from Ubuntu.

Squier Precision Bass Special in Antique Burst (LH)
Rotosound Swing 66s, 45-105

On slapping on a bass:
Quote by supersac
pretend its a woman
i have no helpful advice

#7
On technique:
Learn as many different methods as you can, you may never use some of them but at least if you have to you can. And some can be better for different situations. There is no tonal difference between two and three fingers.

I use floating thumb but floating anchor is fine, whatever suits you and doesn't limit your playing.

DON'T GET A BEHRINGER FOR THE LOVE OF GOD

They are over-rated (literally, they rate them on peak not average wattage) and unreliable. For a practice amp I would get a Kustom, but if you want a gigging amp proper I would save for a little longer to get something a bit like this.

Ibanez SR506BM
Ashdown Little Giant 1000w
Peavey TVX 115+410
A big ass upright

Last edited by m4l666 at Jul 5, 2010,
#8
3. Should I use wandering thumb technique, or use my fret hand to mute? And if i use 3 fingers, do i mute with my pinky then?

Not only it's ideal for muting the lower strings that would be impossible to mute if you were ascending up the strings. The floating thumb also lets you have the same attack and equal comfort when you pluck each string as you're adjusting your hand instead of it being anchored and stretching it further and further.

It's also useful because it puts you in slap position instantly, thumb thumping position and it lets you alternate between all of these without having to waste time having to anchor the thumb to go back to regular playing.

The other plus is that if you ever get a 5 string or a 6 string or beyond, the movable thumb is the most efficient way to play on those.

In terms of fingers, 2 should be fine for everything. You have to work at it but they are more than enough. If you think you have to play faster than that then go ahead with 3.
#9
Fender Rumble 15G is a pretty decent bass amp for the price. You can prob find it for under a hundo.
#10
Kustoms in the KBA models are great for the price, esp. if you can find them used.

Floating thumb is an acceptable technique used by many of us. But after working with beginning bass players it can be a bit much to throw in the mix at first. I find anchoring the thumb and working on the switch between the index and the middle finger for fingerstyle is easier to handle at first. But everyone is different!
#11
Quote by druggietoad2k5
Triplets are far easier to play with 3 instead of 2 fingers.

There's a point for you right there.


You can also play faster with three.

There's another one.

Ibanez K5
Warwick Rockbass Vampyre 4

Line 6 Bass Pod XT Live
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
#12
Quote by Bassist Rising
You can also play faster with three.

There's another one.


Also this.

(I completely forgot about that )

Runcorn Representin', Yo!
Posted from Ubuntu.

Squier Precision Bass Special in Antique Burst (LH)
Rotosound Swing 66s, 45-105

On slapping on a bass:
Quote by supersac
pretend its a woman
i have no helpful advice

#13
1. Learn whatever techniques you want, whenever you want. Nothing wrong with starting with 3 fingers. However, unless you're playing triplets, it may be easier for you to just start working with two until your right hand coordination and technique are solid, and you can keep your notes steady and even. If you feel comfortable with 3 fingers right off the bat though, go for it!

2. Kustom, Acoustic, and Peavey all make fantastic, cheap little practice amps, more specifically, they KBA series (kustom), MAX series (Peavey), and B10 and B20 (Acoustic).

3. You can do floating thumb, or you can anchor your thumb. Both are acceptable techniques and you should use whichever feels most comfortable for you.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#14
is $150 for a used Kustom kba-65 a good price?
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#16
good. I will enjoy annoying my annoying neighbors.

few more questions:

-with the finger technique, is it ok to sometimes two consecutive notes with the same finger, like for example when going up a string (for example hitting G string then D string with the index finger) then going back to alternating, or is this a bad habit?

-on 3 finger technique, do i go 1-2-3-2-1-2, etc or is it 1-2-3-1-2-3 or 3-2-1-3-2-1- etc ? (numbers refer to fingers )

-with wandering thumb, I only move my thumb down a string when I play the G string, is this right?

-when I i go from playing open D string, then to the A string, what is the correct way of muting the open D ?
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Last edited by Outerspacegrass at Jul 6, 2010,
#17
Quote by eddynator
just saying... there's no point in learning to play with 3 fingers. 2 all the way, dude!


Please go try to learn any various technical meta/jazz/whatever band's song and use strictly 2 fingers. Then will you please report back with video results. K thx bai

First questions:

TS really don't limit yourself to strictly 2 fingers. Learn 2, 3 and pick. I spent years playing strictly 2 finger w/ the occasional pick and now that i'm starting to get into much more technical music it isn't cutting it and now I'm really handicapped as I'm trying to get my unused ring finger in the same league as my index and middle which I've been training for 6 years. Let me just say it sucks. I've talked to other guys who did the same thing but after 10-15+ years and they're just having such a hard time with it. So from my personal experience yes bother learning the 2 as it will probably be your bread&butter but anytime you hit a triplet or just a fast section in a song a well trained 3-finger technique is invaluable.

as for your amps idk

As for thumb technique...man honestly I do both it just depends on what song I'm playing and its technical difficulty cus with a lot of string skipping i find it alot easier really just do a hand mute and anchor the thumb where as if skipping is moderate I'll use floating thumb and it keeps your hand from tiring out too quickly.

New Questions:

2 consecutive notes with one finger imo isn't a problem as Tim Commerford (RATM) once said "The faster you can go with less fingers the better off you are"

On 3 finger style there are two different styles.
Straight notes: the most common is 32123 but if you're more comfortable going 12321 go for it
Triplet/Gallup feel: the most common is 321321 but once again if you're more comfortable go 123123

For wander thumb I move it no matter what string I'm on as long as I won't be skipping back down again really quick. It's all preference though do what feels right to you and allows you to play the most smoothly/accurately

For the open D to playing on A (or G to D or A to E) I almost always use my fret hand. I use either an open finger or just touch it with the finger I'm fretting it with

Anyway hope I helped. BTW way to do your homework man. Better than most first time bassists. Also you should get a 6 later down the road they're so much fun lol
#18
I agree with tam, learn to just anchor your hand on the pickup. eventually wandering thumb and anchor will come to you naturally.
no sir away a papaya war is on
#19
thank you everyone!

I love the bass... i play everyday until my left hand fingers are raw.

I'm playing songs mostly with 2 fingers for now, since they are mostly 4th and 8th notes. I'm practicing 3 finger separately though, so i can use it when i start playing 16th notes and triplets.


One more question on technique though, is it a good idea to sync fingers to note length? For example if the song goes Q Q E E E E (Q being quaternote, E being eighth), to play it fingers like so : 1 1 1212 , and if its E Q Q E Q play it like so: 1 2 2 1 2.
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#20
Quote by Outerspacegrass
thank you everyone!

I love the bass... i play everyday until my left hand fingers are raw.

I'm playing songs mostly with 2 fingers for now, since they are mostly 4th and 8th notes. I'm practicing 3 finger separately though, so i can use it when i start playing 16th notes and triplets.


One more question on technique though, is it a good idea to sync fingers to note length? For example if the song goes Q Q E E E E (Q being quaternote, E being eighth), to play it fingers like so : 1 1 1212 , and if its E Q Q E Q play it like so: 1 2 2 1 2.


Some dudes would use just one finger for it all, James Jammerson for example. Tim Commerford said in an interview that he would find himself doing what you said on stage.

what they like about it is that each finger will sound a little different, so with one finger it becomes more consistent.

Short answer, if you like how it sounds and if feels comfortable then it's right. there really is no wrong as long as you like the sound and it doesn't stress joints in anyway, look at different players and really take in how they play, that'll give you idea's of how different even the best of them play.

short answer.
"Whats that noise??"

"... Jazz"