#1
So, Say I'm Playing a 1-4-5 in F.

I would start soloing in F major or D minor like I usually do.

Is there any other scales in a progression like this I can utilize?

I really am not the sharpest when it comes to modes, but can I somehow utilize them here?
#2
Well, a 1-4-5 in F is F, Bb, C, F and repeat, so start with this.

Measure 1:F-A-C
Measure 2:Bb-D-F
Measure 3:C-E-G
Measure 4:F-A-C

In the first measure, your chord is F Major, comprised of F-A-C, and in the key of F, the 'F' note is obviously major, so you can play any 'major' mode (Ionian, Lydian or Mixo-Lydian) starting on F. The A note in that chord is 'minor,' as in the chord in the key of F major formed by starting on a is minor. So you can play any of the 'minor' modes (Dorian, Phrygian, Aeolian, or Locrian- although Locrian might sound odd because of the b5) to emphasize the color of the third. Or to give the chord a dominant feel, you can play any major mode that starts on C.

Using the same logic for measure, 2, Bb is a major note- play a major mode over it. D is a minor note, play a minor mode, and F is major, so play a...

That's the basic approach I take to soloing modally. There's a million other options, but I personally don't know that much about modal soloing, either. Hope I helped with what little I do.
#3
Quote by Funk Monk
So, Say I'm Playing a 1-4-5 in F.

I would start soloing in F major or D minor like I usually do.

Is there any other scales in a progression like this I can utilize?

I really am not the sharpest when it comes to modes, but can I somehow utilize them here?


Modes don't work that way...you're really just going to change scales like the guy ^ said...you switch from F major (Dm)-Bb major (Gm)-C major (Am), and repeat
#4
Quote by guitar_jew
Well, a 1-4-5 in F is F, Bb, C, F and repeat, so start with this.

Measure 1:F-A-C
Measure 2:Bb-D-F
Measure 3:C-E-G
Measure 4:F-A-C

In the first measure, your chord is F Major, comprised of F-A-C, and in the key of F, the 'F' note is obviously major, so you can play any 'major' mode (Ionian, Lydian or Mixo-Lydian) starting on F. The A note in that chord is 'minor,' as in the chord in the key of F major formed by starting on a is minor. So you can play any of the 'minor' modes (Dorian, Phrygian, Aeolian, or Locrian- although Locrian might sound odd because of the b5) to emphasize the color of the third. Or to give the chord a dominant feel, you can play any major mode that starts on C.

Using the same logic for measure, 2, Bb is a major note- play a major mode over it. D is a minor note, play a minor mode, and F is major, so play a...

That's the basic approach I take to soloing modally. There's a million other options, but I personally don't know that much about modal soloing, either. Hope I helped with what little I do.
That's not "modal soloing." You can't just make something modal by playing modes over it.

Hell, you can't even play the D natural minor scale over a progression in F. You may think you're playing it, but in actuality, you're really playing F major.

So basically you have one scale which "fits." What you CAN do however is alter this scale. You could do the blues thing and play the F minor pentatonic over the whole thing. You can also use that blues scale passing tone (between the 4 and 5). You could use a b2, a #2, a b3, a #4, a b6 or a b7 depending on how you plan to use them.

Quote by justaramsfan
Modes don't work that way...you're really just going to change scales like the guy ^ said...you switch from F major (Dm)-Bb major (Gm)-C major (Am), and repeat
Not really, unless you want to tonicize each chord, but if you want to retain the tonality, then I suggest playing F major over the whole thing. If you want to use notes out of the scale, go ahead, but don't modulate like that.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jul 5, 2010,
#5
food nailed it.

if you have a I-IV-V in F major, you play F major. you do not play D minor.

the Bb major scale, C major scale, G minor scale, and A minor scale also have absolutely no place here (unless your aim is to tonicize and/or modulate). if you're soloing strictly in key in a I-IV-V in F major, you use F major -- nothing else.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#6
Food and aeolian nailed it.

same as they both said, but to add my 2 cents:
Play F major the entire time, don't switch keys, that will make much more trouble than it is really worth. Instead, play the changes: emphasize the notes in each chord. Stay in F major, but emphasize the chord tones, specifically the 3rd (or 7th, if it applies).

Other scales to try? Sure you could. Would it sounds good / work? Maybe, maybe not. Experiment a little.

Example: Lot's of times when I'm playing country, say in D, I'll emphasize a lot of G#'s, but only if it does NOT interfere with the chords. That G# makes a unique sound to it. I guess what I'm trying to say, use accidentals but don't make it change keys or clash.

Does that even make sense? I hope so..
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"