#1
Okay I'm not looking for someone to explain to me what the knobs DO on my amp. I have a firm understanding of that, what I'm looking for is a better explanation of how they react with each other and knowing what to boost and if I boost it, how it will affect the sound of the other frequencies.

I'm playing with a Peavey XXX head which has active EQ controls, I understand that anything below 12 o'clock is cutting the frequency and anything over 12 is boosting it, but how does that effect the other settings as well? I've seen multiple times peopel just say "set everything to 12 and tweak from there" but it can't really be that simple? On another forum (some peavey lounge?) I read some amp settings where a guy 'claimed' to get good tones using his EQ settings no higher than 2 on anything, it was like Mids .5 Treble .5 bass 1 and he had his volumes pretty much cranked I believe.

I really just want to understand more how my amp works so I can get the most out of my tone, any knowledge or advice would be greatly appreciated. Not just on active EQ's either,but for EQing in general.

Cheers guys.
My Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser FR Special.
EpiG400 lefty w/Dimarzio X2N/ Irongear Hot Slag
Peavey 6505+112 (head)
2x12 Cab w/ WGS v30 / gt65
GFS Tuner
TS-9 (Keeley ish mod)
Dunlop GCB-95 Wah truebypass
ICP Gstring Decimator
#2
There are a lot of different ways to EQ, and none are really right or wrong, as long as you get a good tone. With an active EQ, the best way is to start from 12 o'clock IMO, and work from there.
#3
Quote by bj_squeelie
Okay I'm not looking for someone to explain to me what the knobs DO on my amp. I have a firm understanding of that, what I'm looking for is a better explanation of how they react with each other and knowing what to boost and if I boost it, how it will affect the sound of the other frequencies.
They don't react with eachother at all. The nice thing about active EQs like the one in the XXX is that the bands are independant.
I'm playing with a Peavey XXX head which has active EQ controls, I understand that anything below 12 o'clock is cutting the frequency and anything over 12 is boosting it, but how does that effect the other settings as well? I've seen multiple times peopel just say "set everything to 12 and tweak from there" but it can't really be that simple? On another forum (some peavey lounge?) I read some amp settings where a guy 'claimed' to get good tones using his EQ settings no higher than 2 on anything, it was like Mids .5 Treble .5 bass 1 and he had his volumes pretty much cranked I believe.

I really just want to understand more how my amp works so I can get the most out of my tone, any knowledge or advice would be greatly appreciated. Not just on active EQ's either,but for EQing in general.

Cheers guys.
Starting at noon and going from there is pretty much how you start. It's kinda hard to explain EQing, but it's something you get the hang of pretty quickly if you keep at it.
Gear:
- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

Bugera Users Militia. We are horrible people. With a sprinkler fetish.
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#4
When I am "tweaking" from noon is there something specific from each frequency I should be aiming for? For instance if I start with all my settings at noon and I'm aiming for a punchy rhytm tone would I boost the bass until I hear enough UMPH, and then move on to mids and/or treble. Or will that UMPH (I don't have a better word for a bass noise) go away if I've boosted the other frequencies? If this is true isn't EQ'ing just kinda like shooting blindly until you hit your target?
My Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser FR Special.
EpiG400 lefty w/Dimarzio X2N/ Irongear Hot Slag
Peavey 6505+112 (head)
2x12 Cab w/ WGS v30 / gt65
GFS Tuner
TS-9 (Keeley ish mod)
Dunlop GCB-95 Wah truebypass
ICP Gstring Decimator
#5
Quote by bj_squeelie
When I am "tweaking" from noon is there something specific from each frequency I should be aiming for? For instance if I start with all my settings at noon and I'm aiming for a punchy rhytm tone would I boost the bass until I hear enough UMPH, and then move on to mids and/or treble.
Yeah, that's basically what you do.
Or will that UMPH (I don't have a better word for a bass noise) go away if I've boosted the other frequencies?
Since the bands are independent, no.
Gear:
- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

Bugera Users Militia. We are horrible people. With a sprinkler fetish.
~ BUM: For all things extinguishing

Rackmount Tube Amp Project <<< Updates!
#6
active means they don't affect each other.
There is a type of EQ circuit where the volume is affected by the EQ as well like the newer twin reverbs, so perhaps it's similar, in that if you have low EQ levels the overall volume will be lowered, and allow you to crank the amp easier.
That could explain why the guy suggested having EQ's very low.

As always it's a matter of personal preference, you might find low value EQ's produce weak results.

With certain guitars, my Vox AC50CPH sounds amazing with the EQ all the way up, but I would never dial that for a Fender style amp for example
'08 Gretsch White Falcon
'98 Fender USA Deluxe Tele
'79 Greco Les Paul Standard
Airline Stratotone Crafter GAE8

A bunch of funky pedals

Handwired 50 Watt Plexi Lead Clone w/ Orange 4x12
Last edited by druz15_UG at Jul 6, 2010,
#7
Quote by druz15_UG
active means they don't affect each other.

Thats a side effect of an active EQ, but thats not what active actually means. It means it is powered, so need some kind of power source, as it can both cut and boost, not just cut like the passive EQ's found in a majority of amps.
#8
Quote by druz15_UG
active means they don't affect each other.
No, active means that it can boost the signal. Passive EQs can only cut. Active EQs in general do have independent bands although it's possible to do it otherwise.
Gear:
- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

Bugera Users Militia. We are horrible people. With a sprinkler fetish.
~ BUM: For all things extinguishing

Rackmount Tube Amp Project <<< Updates!
#9
Quote by druz15_UG
active means they don't affect each other.
There is a type of EQ circuit where the volume is affected by the EQ as well like the newer twin reverbs, so perhaps it's similar, in that if you have low EQ levels the overall volume will be lowered, and allow you to crank the amp easier.
That could explain why the guy suggested having EQ's very low.

As always it's a matter of personal preference, you might find low value EQ's produce weak results.

With certain guitars, my Vox AC50CPH sounds amazing with the EQ all the way up, but I would never dial that for a Fender style amp for example


Okay thanks, On a side note, Would I get any more tube saturation if I cranked the volume knobs but kept the EQ knobs relatively low? Or does that only work if it is actually loud.


I'm starting to understand a bit better, I need to look at my amp's active EQ as an EQ pedal (sort of) since it boosts and cuts, but with only 3 knobs, it seems once I get the hang of EQing with these active controls, an actual EQ pedal in the loop would do my tone wonders, considering I can tweak like 10, or 30 frequencies. (I would never do 30. I would spend all my time EQing and no time playing. >.< )

Thanks for your help so far guys.
My Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser FR Special.
EpiG400 lefty w/Dimarzio X2N/ Irongear Hot Slag
Peavey 6505+112 (head)
2x12 Cab w/ WGS v30 / gt65
GFS Tuner
TS-9 (Keeley ish mod)
Dunlop GCB-95 Wah truebypass
ICP Gstring Decimator
#10
Quote by Kanthras
No, active means that it can boost the signal. Passive EQs can only cut. Active EQs in general do have independent bands although it's possible to do it otherwise.


I meant it in a sense of "if you have active or passive EQ on your amp, the passive EQ is interactive, the active is not" I do know what active EQs mean.

To TS, I wouldn't recommend lowering EQ to try and have more tube saturation. It would be worth a shot in the off chance that you like the sound, but ultimately the power tubes are just going to receive a weaker signal, you're much better off with a PPIMV.

Having said that, it's always gonna sound better the more you crank it.
'08 Gretsch White Falcon
'98 Fender USA Deluxe Tele
'79 Greco Les Paul Standard
Airline Stratotone Crafter GAE8

A bunch of funky pedals

Handwired 50 Watt Plexi Lead Clone w/ Orange 4x12
#11
Quote by bj_squeelie
Okay thanks, On a side note, Would I get any more tube saturation if I cranked the volume knobs but kept the EQ knobs relatively low? Or does that only work if it is actually loud.


I'm starting to understand a bit better, I need to look at my amp's active EQ as an EQ pedal (sort of) since it boosts and cuts, but with only 3 knobs, it seems once I get the hang of EQing with these active controls, an actual EQ pedal in the loop would do my tone wonders, considering I can tweak like 10, or 30 frequencies. (I would never do 30. I would spend all my time EQing and no time playing. >.< )

Thanks for your help so far guys.


the best thing to help with your tone is a loop pedal, or some way of re-amping your guitar.

What I do is play the riff/chord, what have you, into my loop pedal, and then run that through all my pedals and into my amp. Put down guitar but leave loop playing, and twiddle knobs till you get the right sound.

WAY better than
play chord
stop
change mids
play another chord
stop
etc etc

you hear the changes while it's playing, so you can hear how it's affecting the signal.
Want to know what happens when you lower the bass with a distortion pedal on? Easy
'08 Gretsch White Falcon
'98 Fender USA Deluxe Tele
'79 Greco Les Paul Standard
Airline Stratotone Crafter GAE8

A bunch of funky pedals

Handwired 50 Watt Plexi Lead Clone w/ Orange 4x12
#12
Quote by bj_squeelie
Okay thanks, On a side note, Would I get any more tube saturation if I cranked the volume knobs but kept the EQ knobs relatively low? Or does that only work if it is actually loud.
No, you actually have to feed the power tubes a stronger signal to get saturation. I think you might be thinking the master volume actually control the gain or power or something of the power tubes. A lot of people seem to think this, but all a volume (or gain) control does is shunt signal to the ground if you turn it down.
I'm starting to understand a bit better, I need to look at my amp's active EQ as an EQ pedal (sort of) since it boosts and cuts, but with only 3 knobs, it seems once I get the hang of EQing with these active controls, an actual EQ pedal in the loop would do my tone wonders, considering I can tweak like 10, or 30 frequencies. (I would never do 30. I would spend all my time EQing and no time playing. >.< )
Yup, that's pretty much exactly what it is. A 3 band EQ pedal.
Thanks for your help so far guys.
You're welcome!
Gear:
- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

Bugera Users Militia. We are horrible people. With a sprinkler fetish.
~ BUM: For all things extinguishing

Rackmount Tube Amp Project <<< Updates!
#13
Power tubes only clip if the amp is loud and they receive enough signal from the preamp to make them clip. If the signal is lowered so much from the preamp that the volume drops, you're getting less clipping in the power section.
E-peen:
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Peavey 6505
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Gibson R0 Prototype
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(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
#14
Quote by druz15_UG
the best thing to help with your tone is a loop pedal, or some way of re-amping your guitar.

What I do is play the riff/chord, what have you, into my loop pedal, and then run that through all my pedals and into my amp. Put down guitar but leave loop playing, and twiddle knobs till you get the right sound.

WAY better than
play chord
stop
change mids
play another chord
stop
etc etc

you hear the changes while it's playing, so you can hear how it's affecting the signal.
Want to know what happens when you lower the bass with a distortion pedal on? Easy


Holy shit it's so simple it's genius.

For everyone else, thanks for the clarification about the power tubes, that makes sense. I just don't get why anyone would want their EQ settings that low then. personal preference I guess.
My Gear:
Schecter Hellraiser FR Special.
EpiG400 lefty w/Dimarzio X2N/ Irongear Hot Slag
Peavey 6505+112 (head)
2x12 Cab w/ WGS v30 / gt65
GFS Tuner
TS-9 (Keeley ish mod)
Dunlop GCB-95 Wah truebypass
ICP Gstring Decimator
Last edited by bj_squeelie at Jul 6, 2010,
#15
i think a way to approach EQing is to understand the terms and what you want

bassy? reduce bass EQ knob (obvious)
fizzy? turn down higher frequences (trebble/presense?)

at least knowing these terms will help communicate the problem to people that can help -_-

1 more...Crunch, turn up the gain to create distortion.

if you want something that could make you crazy with tweaking, try a boss GT10. @_@
#16
Also, Cutting mids will give you a classic "scooped mid" tone. Popular in metal with high gain. However, when you cut mids you are also making it harder for yourself to be heard in the mix. Sometimes this is good, say for a rhythm track that you want to stay behind a lot of the instruments for. But too much scooping will result in bad times.

Higher mids are often used in lead playing, and a lot in blues playing. Classic blues pedals like the tubescreamer have very high mids because it brings you out from the mix and often smoothens out the grit of the distortion. Setting them too high though will sound a bit muffled and isn't very pleasant. (Although it's all subjective, I guess.)

Mids are very important, especially in a band situation. Use them to you advantage and your band can sound much tighter and just nicer to listen too. Use them badly and your sound could either overpower everything else, or not be able to cut through the mix and pretty much not be heard.
Quote by WtrPlyr
Quote by alans056
Maybe the price tag is clouding your judgment ?
yeah probably. Or the circuits.
#17
set everything to 5 and work from there. If you feel your tone lacks depth, add more bass. if it is too harsh, cut the treble.

It's basically letting your ear decide your tone.
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DBZ guitars, love'em. Especially their Les Piccolo model.