#1
hey guys my friend wants to know the basics on intervals and how to create chords and asked me to teach him
i was thinking of a way to tell him but i noticed am not even sure how to tell him the steps

lets say i was telling how to create a Amin chord since the notes are A, C, E would I say "Root, add a Minor third which would be E and than add a major 3rd which would be E"?
or would I say "Root, add a minor third which would be C, then a perfect 5th"? I know this sounds weird me asking but I alot of people saying it both ways but I always thought it was the first way?

I just don't want to mess up and teach them wrong.

All help appreciated.
Last edited by schism8 at Jul 6, 2010,
#2
But the fifth of a minor chord isn't a diminished fifth, it's a perfect fifth.
#3
Quote by The_Toki
But the fifth of a minor chord isn't a diminished fifth, it's a perfect fifth.

ah my bad.
#4
It is all dealt with minor 3rd's and major 3rd's only.

And a diminished fifth is the tritone, as the poster above me mentioned. In your example that would be Eb.

And also to further show that the second example would be wrong, if you said A minor 3rd, C, diminished fifth, it would be Gb, since a diminished fifth from C is Gb. It's a minor 7th chord! (missing the fifth).

___
And if I may add one more thing, for most of music theory, if you can teach it visually though the piano, it helps tremendously. You don't need to think, "Gee, okay... what interval is this? Well, it has this many half steps so it's a..."
That can all be done visually.
Granted, this works if you are a visual learner like I am : P

*edit*
I forgot to include that for complete chords you can identify specific intervals as their name. For example, you would call the root to the dominant the whatever. If it's the C and an E, then it would be called a P5. But when you construct it is done in thirds.
And an easy way to think about chords is that there are 4 kinds:
*M3m3 (Major)
*m3M3 (Minor)
*M3M3 (Augmented)
*m3m3 (diminished)

You learn that then you are golden for basic chords.
7th chords are just a M3 or a m3 added ontop of the existing chord. So a M3m3M3 is a Maj7 chord whilst a M3m3m3 is jsut a 7 chord.
Last edited by mrddrm at Jul 6, 2010,
#5
Quote by mrddrm
It is all dealt with minor 3rd's and major 3rd's only.

And a diminished fifth is the tritone, as the poster above me mentioned. In your example that would be Eb.

And also to further show that the second example would be wrong, if you said A minor 3rd, C, diminished fifth, it would be Gb, since a diminished fifth from C is Gb. It's a minor 7th chord! (missing the fifth).

___
And if I may add one more thing, for most of music theory, if you can teach it visually though the piano, it helps tremendously. You don't need to think, "Gee, okay... what interval is this? Well, it has this many half steps so it's a..."
That can all be done visually.
Granted, this works if you are a visual learner like I am : P


well just to make sure everyone understands what I'm asking, when teaching him a chord would I just basically add from the root? or would i just say the interval from the newest note added?

wow, i never realized how bad i am at trying to type down what i mean.
maybe you understand what i mean?

and yeah, haha, i actually apply it on this keyboard i have when i'm learning. maybe i'll do so with him?
#7
Quote by schism8
well just to make sure everyone understands what I'm asking, when teaching him a chord would I just basically add from the root? or would i just say the interval from the newest note added?

wow, i never realized how bad i am at trying to type down what i mean.
maybe you understand what i mean?

and yeah, haha, i actually apply it on this keyboard i have when i'm learning. maybe i'll do so with him?


That depends on how he is most comfortable learning it. You could say that a simple major triad is a major third and a minor third on top of that, or you could say that a major triad consists of the root and then a major third and a perfect fifth from the root. It is more helpful to know how the notes of a chord relate to its root, but it might help him understand the positions quicker if you name the intervals it is made up of from each degree. So you could say the distance between the root and the third degree is a major third, and the distance between the third and the fifth degrees is a perfect fifth.
#8
That depends on how he is most comfortable learning it. You could say that a simple major triad is a major third and a minor third on top of that, or you could say that a major triad consists of the root and then a major third and a perfect fifth from the root. It is more helpful to know how the notes of a chord relate to its root, but it might help him understand the positions quicker if you name the intervals it is made up of from each degree. So you could say the distance between the root and the third degree is a major third, and the distance between the third and the fifth degrees is a perfect fifth.


While this is true, when you get into augemented and diminished chords this process would confused the person he is teaching, for you just changed the rules. I would suggest to teach the M3/m3 combination.

Granted, you should really teach scale degrees and intervals ~before~ you teach chords anyways, so the person knows what a M3/m3 are. In addition to this, there are a lot of ways to go around chords and intervals with teaching, but so long as the basic idea is obtained, who is to say who is right and who is wrong?
#9
Make sure you both understand the intervals in the scales (e.g. CDEFGAB = 1234567 in the key of C), if you understand that, you should be able to teach how to build chords really well simply using the intervals.

Quote by schism8
lets say i was telling how to create a Amin chord since the notes are A, C, E would I say "Root, add a Minor third which would be E and than add a major 3rd which would be E"?
or would I say "Root, add a minor third which would be C, then a perfect 5th"? I know this sounds weird me asking but I alot of people saying it both ways but I always thought it was the first way?


In your example here, I would teach it like this:

To build the A min chord, first we find all the notes in the A min scale

Minor scale formual = 1 2 3b 4 5 6b 7b

So in the key of A, it would look like A B C D E F G, which is the A min Scale

then you take the min chord triad (1 3b 5) put in the A min scale (A C E)

and you got the A min scale.

if you have any questions, just pm me, or ask here
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