#1
Hey guys. I just decided to start looking into chord tone soloing so I could improvise over Jazz changes on the fly and have more options and experience in general. Do you know of any good lessons for this? The only one I found here was the beginning one on here but it didn't go really in depth, and what really interests me is using it over more complex chord changes and things that don't stick to one key.

I'm looking for any lessons, advice, chord tone 'shapes', any examples and just any knowledge in general. I don't have a lot of experience with this so everything is helpful.

As long as the chord tones are played it will sound okay, even if it deviates from the key?

There are probably more questions that I'm forgetting but that's what comes to mind right now
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#2
Quote by FacetOfChaos
Hey guys. I just decided to start looking into chord tone soloing so I could improvise over Jazz changes on the fly and have more options and experience in general. Do you know of any good lessons for this? The only one I found here was the beginning one on here but it didn't go really in depth, and what really interests me is using it over more complex chord changes and things that don't stick to one key.

I'm looking for any lessons, advice, chord tone 'shapes', any examples and just any knowledge in general. I don't have a lot of experience with this so everything is helpful.

As long as the chord tones are played it will sound okay, even if it deviates from the key?

There are probably more questions that I'm forgetting but that's what comes to mind right now

I have a couple questions:

How well do you know your fretboard?
How well do you know chords?
Can you make chords on your guitar without having to think too much?
Can you remember what chords are your backing track?
Do you know what notes are in what keys?
How well can you move around the fretboard?

Answer them, and we can help you more.

As for the bolded, yes. Cause if the chord is out of key (say, A - E - F - G or I - V - bVI - bVII) there are out of key notes contained in them. So you're already guaranteed that it'll sound good.

Darren (needs to come more often >:[ ) did something where he tried to land on the third in every chord change. Start with this, but the root instead of the third. Once you can do that good, go to the third. The fifth is really just to strengthen the root so you don't have to worry about landing on that one.
#3
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I have a couple questions:

How well do you know your fretboard?
How well do you know chords?
Can you make chords on your guitar without having to think too much?
Can you remember what chords are your backing track?
Do you know what notes are in what keys?
How well can you move around the fretboard?

-I know the bottom two strings pretty well and can find notes in under a second. The other strings aren't as quick yet but it'll get there.

-I know them fairly well. At least 2-3 positions for the more common ones (major, minor, 7ths etc), but only 1 or two for the chords like 6 chords, 9ths, half diminished, 13

-Yes indeed. Not much thinking required. and I can remember the chords usually.

-I know the keys very well.

-Okay at moving around the fretboard. I'm working on knowing the major scale like the back of my hand (meaning the entire interval pattern up to the 12th fret on all the strings) It's getting there but I can't move through it like water yet. If you mean dexterity also though, that's pretty good.
And I know how to construct most other scales/modify the major scale to get them but I can't play them all over the fretboard yet.

(and I'll be sure to try the landing exercise)
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Jul 6, 2010,
#4
Quote by FacetOfChaos
Hey guys. I just decided to start looking into chord tone soloing so I could improvise over Jazz changes on the fly and have more options and experience in general. Do you know of any good lessons for this? The only one I found here was the beginning one on here but it didn't go really in depth, and what really interests me is using it over more complex chord changes and things that don't stick to one key.

I'm looking for any lessons, advice, chord tone 'shapes', any examples and just any knowledge in general. I don't have a lot of experience with this so everything is helpful.

As long as the chord tones are played it will sound okay, even if it deviates from the key?

There are probably more questions that I'm forgetting but that's what comes to mind right now


Know your triads at a Minimum. You need to have the following skills:

1. The ability to identify the chord that is coming up

2. Where you are on the neck of the guitar in relation to the upcoming chord - the ability to see the notes of that triad or extended chord on the neck of the guitar

3. the facility to approach that note in a musical sounding way.

Optional, you need to be able to do the same for every kind of chord instantly.

For example if I have an A7b9 I need to know A C# E G Bb and where those notes are by the time the chord approaches and choose the best musical "angle" to approach one of them, from where I am now.


Best,

Sean
#5
Quote by FacetOfChaos
-I know the bottom two strings pretty well and can find notes in under a second. The other strings aren't as quick yet but it'll get there.

-I know them fairly well. At least 2-3 positions for the more common ones (major, minor, 7ths etc), but only 1 or two for the chords like 6 chords, 9ths, half diminished, 13

-Yes indeed. Not much thinking required. and I can remember the chords usually.

-I know the keys very well.

-Okay at moving around the fretboard. I'm working on knowing the major scale like the back of my hand (meaning the entire interval pattern up to the 12th fret on all the strings) It's getting there but I can't move like water through it yet. If you mean dexterity also though, that's pretty good.

(and I'll be sure to try the landing exercise)

Then you're good. If you can remember the chords that are playing, and you can, before the chords come, decide what note you're going to land on (and do it), you're set. Just keep doing that landing exercise and you'll get there. Just practice, practice, practice at that point. Do some easy soloing over easy changes and steadily pick up the pace.

Actually, try planning out where you're going to land before you even start the song. Get the chords and say "I'm going to land on this C here, and then in this measure I'll land on the F#" and then play slowly and do it.
#6
Okay, thanks guys :3
Is there a list somewhere of 'patterns' for the notes I can use over each chord type or should I just figure it out myself? It would be nice to have more options than just the chord shape.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#8
All the arpeggios I had seen before were just the linear, 1 note per string things.
I wasn't sure if the multiple-note per string ones were still considered arpeggios. Found some stuff for them now, so thank you. Just what I was looking for.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#9
Quote by FacetOfChaos
All the arpeggios I had seen before were just the linear, 1 note per string things.
I wasn't sure if the multiple-note per string ones were still considered arpeggios. Found some stuff for them now, so thank you. Just what I was looking for.

All an arpeggio is is the notes of a chord played individually. Nothing more, nothing less. You can play them any way you please.

The reason you mainly play the one-note per string pattern is because doing a full arpeggio on one string requires INSANE stretching. Even the smallest (fret wise) chord, the diminished triad, is hard below the 9th fret.

Only person I know of able to do that kind of stuff would be Shawn Lane, whose small hands didn't limit his ability to play augmented arpeggios on one string. There's definitely more, but I can't think of anyone.
#10
Quote by FacetOfChaos
Okay, thanks guys :3
Is there a list somewhere of 'patterns' for the notes I can use over each chord type or should I just figure it out myself? It would be nice to have more options than just the chord shape.
Yep. A good exercise for you might be to just play over a drone (C7 for example) and work on hitting and moving between the chord tones (C E G Bb) up and down the neck. Repeat with different chords until you start to see the patterns.

I personally think it's great to be familiar with patterns but I think you should never jump straight to patterns, you should experiment with the scale first then you will start to be familiar with the pattern, AND you will have a better understanding of how the scale sounds.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#11
If you play music you play in patterns. A Major scale is a series of whole and half steps, in pattern. An interval of a half step is a pattern, as is a whole. Intervals are patterns, it just depends on how you stack them and to what depth you see them as a whole. The guitar is nothing but patterns.