#1
Hi
I'd like to know if there's a way to find the name of a scale, so I can see it in the entire neck, just from the notes of the scale.

In this case the notes of the scale are these

C D E F G A A#

So, is there a site or something that can help me with that, I throw the notes and it tells me what scale it is?
#3
you look for the # and flats (b). if the scale is ascending, you use sharps and if the scale is descending, you use flats. the number of sharps or flats will tell you the key signature and you can conclude the scale from it.

it will either be all flats or sharps in the key sig. do not mix because it will not work.
#4
the order of flats

0 flat- :: Key Of C :: Minor Key Of Am
1 flat-B :: Key Of F :: Minor Key Of Dm
2 flat-E :: Key Of Bb :: Minor Key Of Gm
3 flat-A :: Key Of Eb :: Minor Key Of Cm
4 flat-D :: Key Of Ab :: Minor Key Of Fm
5 flat-G :: Key Of Db :: Minor Key Of Bbm
6 flat-C :: Key Of Gb :: Minor Key Of Ebm
7 flat-F :: Key Of Cb/B :: Minor Key Of G#m/Abm

order of sharps

1 sharps-F :: Key Of G :: Minor Key Of Em
2 sharps-C :: Key Of D :: Minor Key Of Bm
3 sharps-G :: Key Of A :: Minor Key Of Fm
4 sharps-D :: Key Of E :: Minor Key Of C#m
5 sharps-A :: Key Of B :: Minor Key Of G#m
6 sharps-E :: Key Of F# :: Minor Key Of D#m
7 sharps-B :: Key Of Db :: Minor Key Of A#m/Bbm

notice the order of the sharps are the reverse of the order of the flats

Last edited by Haustinj at Jul 6, 2010,
#5
Quote by Risoles
Hi
I'd like to know if there's a way to find the name of a scale, so I can see it in the entire neck, just from the notes of the scale.

In this case the notes of the scale are these

C D E F G A A#

So, is there a site or something that can help me with that, I throw the notes and it tells me what scale it is?
Here are a few steps to take:

1) Try not to repeat letters if you can (in other words, if you have a note that's a repeat, use its enharmonic note), as most heptatonic scales don't contain, say, an A and an A#.
2) Order them starting at the root. Don't know what the root is? Listen to the context (if you have any) and find out where it resolves to.
3) Look at the intervals they contain and lay them out like I show you at the bottom.
4) Try to match this up with a familiar "scale formula."

Your "scale" repeats a letter, so we're gonna change that A# to a Bb because that's what it actually is. That gives us C D E F G A Bb. If C is the root, then those intervals are 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7. In a modal context you'd call that the mixolydian mode, but otherwise you could call it the mixolydian scale (I guess) or just an alteration of the major scale (you could call it the major b7 scale or major dominant scale) if that's how it's functioning.

And if the root isn't necessarily C, two other options are F major and D natural minor (as Aeolian was saying). You have F G A Bb C D E (1 2 3 4 5 6 7) or D E F G A Bb C (1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jul 6, 2010,
#6
Before we can tell you for sure what the scale is, we need to know what the root note is. After that, just use what food1010 said, he put it reaally well.

Quote by food1010
Here are a few steps to take:

1) Try not to repeat letters if you can (in other words, if you have a note that's a repeat, use its enharmonic note), as most heptatonic scales don't contain, say, an A and an A#.
2) Order them starting at the root. Don't know what the root is? Listen to the context (if you have any) and find out where it resolves to.
3) Look at the intervals they contain and lay them out like I show you at the bottom.
4) Try to match this up with a familiar "scale formula."

Your "scale" repeats a letter, so we're gonna change that A# to a Bb because that's what it actually is. That gives us C D E F G A Bb. If C is the root, then those intervals are 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7. In a modal context you'd call that the mixolydian mode, but otherwise you could call it the mixolydian scale (I guess) or just an alteration of the major scale (you could call it the major b7 scale or major dominant scale) if that's how it's functioning.

And if the root isn't necessarily C, two other options are F major and D natural minor (as Aeolian was saying). You have F G A Bb C D E (1 2 3 4 5 6 7) or D E F G A Bb C (1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7).


Also, you probably need to make sure you understand the scale formula, I bolded it in the quote. If you don't understand what all of that means, you might want to learn it, it will help a ton.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
Last edited by sites.nick at Jul 6, 2010,
#7
^ And you can learn it in the second link in my sig.

You can determine which note is the root in the first link of my sig, in the case where it's used in a song.
i don't know why i feel so dry