#1
I really envy people who can sing second or third voices. I can hear them and if I hear a harmonized song many times I can actually try to do it to. What I would like to learn is to pick up and sing the harmony someone sings the melody.

Is there some reading I could do first (like there are many techniques to harmony - above, below, country, jazz ... ). Is there a site with introduction to all these techniques you could recommend?
#3
Thank you for your reply. I know the basic theory. I actually know even the more advanced theory. That will not help me to learn how to actually sing the harmonies. That is unless I first write the melody line and then write the voice. By then the party is over
#4
Quote by sevenofnine
Thank you for your reply. I know the basic theory. I actually know even the more advanced theory. That will not help me to learn how to actually sing the harmonies. That is unless I first write the melody line and then write the voice. By then the party is over


Well, you know, that's how it's done. It's ear training; just knowing what the third or fifth or whatever sounds like over the melody. There aren't really any tricks other than interval training.
#5
Quote by Chaingarden
... There aren't really any tricks other than interval training.

Point well made, thanks.
#6
What it takes is essentially the ability to transcribe a melody in your head, work out the notes that would go with it, and be able to sing them. Assuming you're not one of those naturally gifted freaks, this will be a conscious process at first. Work on transcribing, or at least replicating melodies on an instrument. With a fairly basic understanding of theory you should be able to figure out what goes with it, and well, simply singing the notes can be an undertaking in and of itself. Overtime you'll develop an ear for how harmonies work and won't need to think on a note-by-note basis, but for a while it might be very cerebral.

Also, the 1-3-5 thing is a SLIGHTLY oversimplified view of harmonies. A C melody note on a C chord would indeed be (typically) harmonized with an E and G, but an E melody note over the same chord would be (typically) harmonized with a G and a C. The same C melody note over an F chord would be (typically) harmonized with an F and an A. Additionally, the C over the C chord could be harmonized with a G below and an E above. It really is in the name: To harmonize a melody is to introduce a harmonic dimension to melodic material. Note choice is dictated by the harmony you're trying to create. By saying typically I mean to say that it's not always the most basic or obvious note. Sometimes introducing non-chord tones into the mix helps the parts flow better or avoid clashing, but just to get you on the right track, try harmonizing by chord tones using roughly parallel motion.
#7
Harmonizing in my opinion is very simple, even more so for vocals then guitar because it is usually slower. Generally, you harmonize with other notes being played in the chord. Most common is using a third, but if the vocalist isn't singing the root note of the chord, then you may ended up singing a sixth (an inversion of the third). You can't really go wrong using fifth's but they so bland, so just mix it up. And then add in notes outside the chords as you transition to another to may it exciting.
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