#1
Hi UG!

I have a question for you who know theory

When you practice or learn scales, do you learn them by patterns? say the G major scale for example. Do you just learn the patterns in the scale? Or do you learn that the G major scale got one accidental and just play the notes all over the neck? like G A B C D E F# G. This would make it obvious to know the notes on the board, which is good.

Ive always played with patterns but i presume the other alternative i better :s
But how do you do it?
#2
It's convenient to start out using patterns, and then gradually learn to think in terms of notes. Practising patterns each day will make you better technically, and free your mind up to think in terms of notes, which you will then find more quickly because you have the patterns as a framework.
#3
I find that learning only by patterns is very limiting (to me at least). When I started out, I learned the major scale in a couple different keys by the notes, and after a while the patterns were just natural.

The way I deal with scales now is by intervals. For example, I couldn't name to you how many flats the Gb major scale has off the top of my head, but I can tell you that it contains Gb Ab Bb Cb Db Eb F because of the 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 formula.
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#4
Quote by Pettah
Hi UG!

I have a question for you who know theory

When you practice or learn scales, do you learn them by patterns? say the G major scale for example. Do you just learn the patterns in the scale? Or do you learn that the G major scale got one accidental and just play the notes all over the neck? like G A B C D E F# G. This would make it obvious to know the notes on the board, which is good.

Ive always played with patterns but i presume the other alternative i better :s
But how do you do it?



BOTH

There is no reason for a "this or that" POV.

scale patterns are a visual representation of the scale..... this is very HELPFUL.

A scale formula is a theoretical pattern.... to utilize this pattern you need to be familiar with where the notes are on your instrument.

It's all useful.... and each perspective reinforces the other. No sense in ignoring any of it.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 6, 2010,
#5
Quote by blue_strat
It's convenient to start out using patterns, and then gradually learn to think in terms of notes. Practising patterns each day will make you better technically, and free your mind up to think in terms of notes, which you will then find more quickly because you have the patterns as a framework.


Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#6
When I started learning scales, I just learned the patterns. Then I noticed that the patterns of the scales I was learning were connected, and helped push me toward learning theory. Now I learn scales as intervals and make the patterns myself (or if I'm lazy I just look them up), but I always know what's going on.
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#7
I agree you want to know both. And you also want to understand how to relate intervals to notes on the fretboard. I think patterns help, especially in the beginning, but don't get caught up in thinking that's all you need. Just knowing patterns is limiting, but in coordination with knowing notes and intervals you'll have a great command of the fretboard.
#8
^ for sure

knowing ANY one thing (and nothing else) is limiting. This is just as true for the ever popular "scale formulas + the notes on the neck" advice.

So there is no need to spread caution about learning scale patterns...... or any other piece of relevant information. it all goes towards broadening our perspective. How far we take it is our own choice.

I also want to reiterate that scale patterns are not simply a beginner's crutch, but rather a useful tool for anyone at any level. They simply give us another tool with which to broaden and reinforce our understanding.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 6, 2010,
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
BOTH

There is no reason for a "this or that" POV.

scale patterns are a visual representation of the scale..... this is very HELPFUL.

A scale formula is a theoretical pattern.... to utilize this pattern you need to be familiar with where the notes are on your instrument.

It's all useful.... and each perspective reinforces the other. No sense in ignoring any of it.

Yes there is, because learning the patterns doesn't automatically teach you the notes.

However, learning the notes of the scale and locating them on the guitar will automatically teach you the patterns.

Like you've said though, ultimately you need to know both...notes, intervals and sounds so you understand the scale, patterns to help you actually use it.
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#10
Quote by steven seagull
Yes there is, because learning the patterns doesn't automatically teach you the notes.

.


No there isn't, because if you choose one over the other you miss out on one or the other.

what good does it do to view pieces of information as competitors?

its information....... the proper thing to do with it would be to use it.


Quote by steven seagull

ultimately you need to know both...notes, intervals and sounds so you understand the scale, patterns to help you actually use it.


There you go ..........A this AND that point of view. now that's what I'm talking about.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 6, 2010,