#1
Hello, everyone! im 16 and i decided i was gonna become a session musician. not as a career choice, but as a local side job. does anyone have any tips or suggestions that could be useful in pursuing this?
LET THERE BE ROCK
#3
People will pick apart what you do and expect you to play things the way they want it played. don't take it as an insult. It's just like any other job and whoever hires you is the boss. You may want to learn to read sheet music as well.
#4
Learn to read music, play a lot of styles, and get really good at doing things in as few takes as possible.
#6
Quote by Guitarmaster94
Hello, everyone! im 16 and i decided i was gonna become a session musician. not as a career choice, but as a local side job. does anyone have any tips or suggestions that could be useful in pursuing this?


be a good schmoozer.

It pretty much goes without saying that you should be an experienced and versatile player. reading skills are a plus. but honestly if you've got all those skills it comes down to one thing.......... schmoozing.
shred is gaudy music
#7
Quote by GuitarMunky
be a good schmoozer.

It pretty much goes without saying that you should be an experienced and versatile player. reading skills are a plus. but honestly if you've got all those skills it comes down to one thing.......... schmoozing.

Yeah, in this case, it's what you know AND who you know.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#8
being a session musician is not a side job...the amount of energy it takes to stay employed is not a casual undertaking--reading at a high lever is a must..knowing ALL the popular styles is required...knowing less popular styles is a bonus...knowing how to play more than one instrument is a super plus...

i tune my other stringy things-banjo mandolin etc like the guitar so the chords and solos adapt to my guitar style...

don't be ON TIME...be there 15 - 20 mins before the session...all set up ready to play...this is a BIG plus...gives you time to look over the lead sheet-if its ready...some time they just write it mins before the take...and hope its in the key your going to play in so you don't have to transpose in your head....you might practice doing a bit of that--just in case...

the call back is vital...if you get along with the contractor/players...they may request you next time...

studio/session work is not what it was 20 yrs ago...but whats left of it remains pretty much the same...

play well

wolf
#9
Be versatile. Be able to play many styles and do what you're told.

Be able to sight read incredibly well. Typically, there is one "rehearsal" to make sure the music is written down is ready to go. '

NEVER BURN BRIDGES!

There is a two part column here on UG about being a session musician. http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/being_a_session_guitarist.html
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#10
Quote by Guitarmaster94
Hello, everyone! im 16 and i decided i was gonna become a session musician. not as a career choice, but as a local side job. does anyone have any tips or suggestions that could be useful in pursuing this?

yeah; dont bother. you cannot be a side job session musician. its hard to get into these days. most of the money is in film jobs but good luck getting into that.

sorry to be a downer but odds are its not going to happen. not at your age anyway. not at all at your age actually unless you are a god.

if you do want to get into it, try looking for local/indie films that need scoring. it might be hard to find but ive seen some ads online looking for this. you might not get paid, but it will give you experience, which obviously people want.

you will need to know how to sight read well and be able to interpret music well. you will need to be a creative player as well and may even need songwriting abilities.

like i said, its not a side job. unless you know someone who owns a recording studio and has someone who needs a player on a track or something.
#11
Go to the library and dig up old issues of Guitar Player with Tommy Tedesco's columns.

Tommy was a highly-sought-after LA area studio musician for many years. Played on almost any sort of recording you can think of. Also "doubled" on nearly any stringed instrument.

Tommy always stressed sight-reading ability for studio guitarists, as well as an ability to please the session leader and to be able to play what was desired. It is not a place for improvisation or doing your own thing.
The ability to play multiple instruments led to more gigs as well as more money, scale went up if you "doubled".
He always gave detailed notes on his sessions in his monthly columns.
#12
Quote by Guitarmaster94
Hello, everyone! im 16 and i decided i was gonna become a session musician. not as a career choice, but as a local side job. does anyone have any tips or suggestions that could be useful in pursuing this?


Learn to sight read and chart read. Become competent in many different styles.