#1
Hello this may seem like a silly question but im wondering where should my picking hand be? I dont anchor my pinkie down, im trying to just let it hover but should i just let it rest on the strings where im not playing or let it hover.

Thanks alot in advance!
#2
Put it where it's comfortable. There is no "correct" in technique, only personal preference.
#4
I find that for most parts I kind of float, but if anything, I rest the heel of my palm/wrist sort of on the bridge on the low E string and if I need to mute higher strings, my hand slides down a bit and the side of my hand will mute those.

This is me playing a little drunk and not really paying attention, as you can see, I'm kind of floating.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#5
You want to hover your hand above the strings if you are not muting. It should not anchor on anything unless it is for a specific purpose (palm muting, muting..).
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#6
Well, here's the thing, which I clarified from a reputable music teacher from these very forums.

Your hand's not anchoring if it's muting strings in the way that Freepower describes.

Why? Because it's not staying in the same spot the entire time you play - that's anchoring. Your right hand is very lightly touching the strings, muting the higher strings with the side of your thumb or the heel of your palm, while your left hand's index finger is dampening the lower strings. If you do it that way, any time you go to play a note, you have all the strings you aren't playing muted. This is key for anyone that plays with distortion, as those open strings can accumulate feedback and make noise a lot more easily.

A really good test to see if you are floating or muting is to examine your sweep picking technique - I can't see somebody sweeping all six strings if they are anchoring, not if their hand is staying in the same spot. I don't think your wrist can move that far.
#7
I always like to have the back of my palm touching the bridge, even when I'm sweeping. Apparently, though, I'm not supposed to do that
#9
Quote by The Hunger
I always like to have the back of my palm touching the bridge, even when I'm sweeping. Apparently, though, I'm not supposed to do that

That's not going to hinder you. If anything it's extra mute and won't create any noise if done correctly.

@TS: There is a difference between anchoring and letting it hang on the fretboard. I have big hands so my pinky likes to dip down. This is an old video of mine (over a year!) and, while my technique has changed since, it's basically the same. Notice how my pinky touches the guitar... but I don't push down on my guitar and create any sort of pressure (i.e. my pinky can move around and I'm not relying on it to keep my hand still). A notable anchorer, you can see John Petrucci actually tense up every time he does a fast run. This is the bane of anchoring. Any sort of tenseness = bad for the player.

I've tried having my hand the way hockeyplayer's is, but I feel like I'm too disconnected from my guitar and can't mute as well. That's just personal preference though...

Stupid big hands.
#11
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I've tried having my hand the way hockeyplayer's is, but I feel like I'm too disconnected from my guitar and can't mute as well. That's just personal preference though...

Stupid big hands.

Yeah, I do have pretty small hands, which on guitar seems to be great for everything except large intervals. But yeah, either way, that's just the way my hands naturally act. I actually haven't spent any time focusing on my form.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.