#1
I don't know why, but I sing lots better when I'm playing guitar at the same time. This poses a problem when trying to make a high quality recording. It works okay for playing soft stuff like fingerstyle but when I need to use a pick the guitar overpowers it. But if I put the mic closer to my face then the vocals just overshadow everything.

Any ideas? I've tried time and again to sing without the guitar but it never comes out as good.
#2
You're gonna need at least two mics, three would be ideal for a professional sound.
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#3
Things I have done on sessions in the past that have worked with some:

1. record it the way you are as a scratch track, then overdub it with actual singing and guitar.
2. record the singing while playing air guitar.
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#4
a second mic would help a whole lot. if you want quality, you wont get it from one mic. you'd have to find the perfect spot between your mouth and guitar, but it wont turn out nearly as good as it would if you had at least two mics.
#6
Quote by L2112Lif
Two mics is great, but three mics is supreme for voice and acoustic guitar. Two pencils in a close setup just offset of the soundhole, and a vocal mic pointed at your nose. Otherwise, one mic thats offset at a sharp angle of your soundhole.



personally, i'd go for 3 mics and a DI if the guitar has a pickup. depending on the kind of music, and the other instruments that are or are not playing along, i would go for a large or small diaphragm condenser on the body, and a small on the neck. and of course a good vocal mic on the vocals...
#7
if you've got access to a couple of mics with a figure-of-eight polar pattern, you can place one on the guitar and one for the vocals and cancel out half the phase on each mic. You can get a really good separation between the two with little spillage then!
#9
there are tons of programs that can record multiple tacks at once. protools, cuabse, reaper, etc.

another option would be to record your acoustic to a click track. so lay down a nice sounding, very tight track. then record your vocals while playing an electric. you will get pick noise, but the vocals will not be overpowered by the guitar. you will get some bleed, so you have to be in time still, but i find this to be an easier way to get this kind of thing recorded.
#10
Quote by jof1029
there are tons of programs that can record multiple tacks at once. protools, cuabse, reaper, etc.

another option would be to record your acoustic to a click track. so lay down a nice sounding, very tight track. then record your vocals while playing an electric. you will get pick noise, but the vocals will not be overpowered by the guitar. you will get some bleed, so you have to be in time still, but i find this to be an easier way to get this kind of thing recorded.



This is an excellent suggestion, but remember if you're not DI-ing your guitar, to put the amp in isolation. Basically, take it and lock it up in a shoe closet, mic it, and then smother it so it doesn't bleed out the door.
#11
i meant play the electric completly unplugged, but that works too. youve already got a nice acoustic track to work with, so i wouldnt even bother with an electric track. unless you wanted to do overdubs, but thats not what we were talking about.
#13
I recently recorded an acoustic track using one stereo pair. This would be very similar to a single mic but with a slight stereo image on the guitar. If you find the perfect piece of air you are in many ways better off recording from one bit of air rather than 2 or 3. With 2 or 3 mics there is a lot of spill which makes the track sound fuzzy. Sure it's much easier to balance 2 mics but if you get it right with one it will sound great.

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