#1
Hi,
A friend of mine blocks his FR-type tremolo off by simply sinking the bridge as far into the body as possible and removing the whammy bar (meaning the bridge can't be pulled up).

Is this a decent way of blocking the trem? Are there any drawbacks of doing this?

Thanks
#2
Yep, you're basically kicking yourself in the shin when you look at intonation and setting up the action. Don't do it.

If you really want to block your trem, use one of the more respectable methods, like fitting blocks or wood, or playing cards (personal favourite) wrapped in plumbers' tape. \
Hell, even a Tremol-no...
#3
It makes no sense whatsoever buying a guitar with a trem then blocking the damned thing.
#4
I don't know about FR but with a strat style bridge, you can block it by putting a bit of wood inside it, my strat came like it but I took it out so I could use it.
Gear
Gibson SG Standard with Bare Knuckle Riff Raff and Stormy Monday
Fender Eric Clapton Signature Strat
Dunlop Crybaby Classic
Fulltone OCD
EHX Holy Grail Nano
BYOC Tone Bender Clone
Korg Pitchblack
Fender Bassman '59 Reissue
#5
Quote by sstony
It makes no sense whatsoever buying a guitar with a trem then blocking the damned thing.

Nope, but it makes sense that people's opinions about things change, so that suddenly they don't want to have a trem, or want to use it in a different way.

Take off your wig and put back the hammer, you're not a judge.
#6
Quote by Y00p
Nope, but it makes sense that people's opinions about things change, so that suddenly they don't want to have a trem, or want to use it in a different way.

Take off your wig and put back the hammer, you're not a judge.

Or they don´t know how to set it up so they become frustrated and block it.
#7
Quote by sstony
Or they don´t know how to set it up so they become frustrated and block it.

You've just answered your own question as well, then.

Oh and TS, what you're describing works better on non-floating vibrato's, like standard Strat bridges. I see lots of guitars with regular vibrato's, where the claw in the back's been driven in as far as it can, so the actual bridge is pressed onto the body and won't move (Not a lot, at least).

I stand by it, though... You shouldn't do it on a floater!