#1
Long: Hi guys there's something that has been bugging me for a long time. Whenever I change the tuning of my strings I have trouble adjusting the height of my floyd rose. Yesterday to play some blues so I changed my tuning to D# and my floyd rose like 30 degrees and whatever I do I can't seem to make it right.

Why is this happening everytime I play with the strings? I re-string my guitar, it rises. I change the tuning, same. Isn't there someway I can just change the tuning and play without trying to get the perfect tune/FL height like hundreds of times? Don't get me wrong I'm definately not new to guitar, but this problem I couldn't solve for years. It didn't used to be a problem since back then I only played at E chord progression but now I want to explore. I really hated the floyd rose experience and until I get a strat or something I need to be able to manage it.

Short: How do I keep the floyd rose from rising when I'm changing tune? (chord progression)

Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
#2
You can't really change tuning on a Original Floyd Rose without causing changes in the bridge height. The bridge is kept level by the string tension on the front and the spring tension in the back (open your backplate if you haven't already). Once one changes, the forces are out of equilibrium and the bridge shifts. Perhaps there have been other amazing new mods to the floyd that I know about, but the only tune-n-play guitar with a floyd on the market is the Steinberger guitar.
#3
Think how a FR system works. String tension is balanced by the springs in the back. Change the tension of the strings and they (or the springs) will win the battle and tilt your bridge assembly. This will change the string height and the intonation, so is a pain to correct.
Answer. You can get a device like a Tremol-no or similar to fix the trem in one position. Or you can confine your changed tunings to a fixed bridge guitar.
I pick up my guitar and play
Just like Yesterday

T C Ellis Series 2 LP w/Skatterbrane Quiescence pups
Cort EVL-K6
Yamaha RGX211 modded
H&S Electric 12-string
Shaftsbury Ricki 4001
'84 Fender Yale
Roland Cube 15x

#4
I love my Floyd Rose guitar.

I also bought a string through guitar because I realize that having a Floyd Rose means you wont be changing the tuning much. Basically when you change the tuning of the strings there is either more or less general tension being put on the floyd. If its floating in the middle and you tune down it should fall slightly because the strings are now pulling a little less hard down at the bridge.

I haven't done this in years so i don't remember exactly how to do it but i know to readjust the height of the floyd if you tune it different than standard or whatever it is set up for you have to open up the back and readjust the placement of the coils inside the guitar. Open it up, mess around with different combinations of the two or three coils in the back, and see what happens.
#5
Yeah, that's FR for you. Lately, I've come to the conclusion that a fixed bridge or a non-locking tremolo system is better. Sure, you'll have to tune it much more often, but it'll take you less than a minute when you do it.
Gear:

Guitars: Ibanez SV5470F, Ibanez Xpt700, Fender MIM Standard Stratocaster ('04-'05), Jackson Ps-2
Ashton AG200,
Amps: ENGL E530, Bugera 6262-212,
FX: TC Electronics G-major 2, Behringer EQ700, Morley Volume / Wah
#7
I solved the problem by loosening all the strings and re-tightening them simultaneously at the same time. Floyd Rose didn't seem to have a problem with that. Maybe it worked because I gave equal pressure to all the strings at the same time. I also screwed the coils at the back as much as possible. (that sounds awfully bad )

Anyway thanks for the help guys. I won't be struggling with the FL until I want to change the chord progression again. Maybe I'll lock it in the future. Cheers.
#8
Quote by Satchurator
I solved the problem by loosening all the strings and re-tightening them simultaneously at the same time. Floyd Rose didn't seem to have a problem with that. Maybe it worked because I gave equal pressure to all the strings at the same time. I also screwed the coils at the back as much as possible. (that sounds awfully bad )

Anyway thanks for the help guys. I won't be struggling with the FL until I want to change the chord progression again. Maybe I'll lock it in the future. Cheers.

The bold bit did nothing.

It "worked" because you've over-tightened the trem claw which isn't actually a fix. Your trem didn't move for sure, but i'm assuming it's now sunk way too low. The reason it didn't move is because the tension of the springs is now far higher than the range of tension you've ben applying to the strings which is bad for your bridge as it's sat at an odd angle with uneven pressure on the knife edges.

Bottom line is you can't chop and change tunings easily on a Floyd Rose, that's not what they're designed for.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#9
It "worked" because you've over-tightened the trem claw which isn't actually a fix. Your trem didn't move for sure, but i'm assuming it's now sunk way too low.


It doesn't seem like I overtightened anything and my trem isnt sunk low or too high.

The reason it didn't move is because the tension of the springs is now far higher than the range of tension you've ben applying to the strings


What do you base this on? I mean, how can you assume that my current tension is higher than the previous? They are the same strings, and they apply the same pressure. I just loosened and tightened them again. What changed?

Don't get me wrong I'm not trying to disprove what you've said, but if you I right then I did something wrong. What would you have done to correct your floyd rose height?
#10
I believe you should really read up on how a floating bridge functions and how it's used.

SUPEREDIT: What's this about 'only playing in E chord progression', and now you want to explore, thus have to change tunings?
Last edited by Y00p at Jul 7, 2010,
#11
What's this about 'only playing in E chord progression', and now you want to explore, thus have to change tunings?


That may have sounded wrong, what I merely wanted to say was I'm currently working on songs SRV and Hendrix and neither of them play in E, They play in D# so I tune my strings half a step down, changing the pressure of my strings and resulting a change in my tremolo height. And a week later if I want to switch back to E, I can't adjust my tremolo's height as it should be.