#1
K, i have a free recording program called kristal. i really like the program, as it has pretty much everything i need. My only problem, is that whilst i have everything i need, i know absolutely nothing about using the stuff well. I suck at EQ adjustments, panning etc.
I was wondering if anyone can lead me to a guide which explains the terms (EQ, frequency, Q etc) very easily, without science-sounding rubbish. And also, id like to know HOW to use the stuff i learn.

Many thanks
#2
I don't know of one, and I've never heard of Kristal. I would strongly suggest downloading Reaper (http://www.reaper.fm/download.php). You could ask specific questions (it'll be easier once you start trying to record stuff) and myself and others could definitely help you.
#3
Quote by sambot12
I don't know of one, and I've never heard of Kristal. I would strongly suggest downloading Reaper (http://www.reaper.fm/download.php). You could ask specific questions (it'll be easier once you start trying to record stuff) and myself and others could definitely help you.


ok, thanks man ive heard of reaper, and im aware its not free? will the non-payment version give me everything i need?
#4
EQ= equalizer, you can use it to increase the volume of some frequency to put it bluntly, I can't really explain myself what a frequency is

but basically
low frequencies= low notes= bass guitar/kick drum
high frequencies=high notes= solo lead guitar

I use EQ very randomly. I just record something and then I play around in EQ until it sounds better, works every time. I don't use panning at all.
#5
Yeah it's the same and the trial doen't run out either, but I encourage you to support the people that make it so affordable and pay for the personal license if you have the money, it's only $60.
#6
Quote by sambot12
Yeah it's the same and the trial doen't run out either, but I encourage you to support the people that make it so affordable and pay for the personal license if you have the money, it's only $60.



Yeah, i understand man ill look into it, and when i get some money on my next birthday, ill consider paying for the personal lisense
#7
Quote by Zeletros
EQ= equalizer, you can use it to increase the volume of some frequency to put it bluntly, I can't really explain myself what a frequency is

but basically
low frequencies= low notes= bass guitar/kick drum
high frequencies=high notes= solo lead guitar

I use EQ very randomly. I just record something and then I play around in EQ until it sounds better, works every time. I don't use panning at all.


Panning is extremely important, not sure why you wouldn't use it...

Pitch has little to do with frequency, but bass and kick generally occupy the lower frequencies more than other instruments. High and low notes on a guitar will have almost the same frequency response if the EQ settings are the same.

Generally, you want to have 2 tracks of guitar (each one recorded, no copy and paste) panned out to each side. Also helps if the signal chain is slightly different for each track (ex: using an od pedal for one track, and just the amp on the other).

For drums, just know you want to pan out all the drums like they would be set up, but kick and snare center. Don't worry about compression and reverb for now.

Bass just one track centered.

Note that there are other ways to do all of these, but this is what I've found works the best for me.
#8
I keep it simple mate, it bugs me already enough that I've to waste 5h to finish a song. For drums and pretty much everything expect guitars I use VST and they're automatically panned as should

my sound and home studio isn't worth wasting more than that


You can check out my channel to see what I've done
http://www.youtube.com/user/Zeletros
Last edited by Zeletros at Jul 7, 2010,
#9
Quote by Zeletros
You can check out my channel to see what I've done
http://www.youtube.com/user/Zeletros


Actually not too bad, but definitely don't give that advice to someone starting out. 5 hours on a song is a lot for you? That's really very little time if you're trying to get a quality production.
#10
Quote by sambot12
Actually not too bad, but definitely don't give that advice to someone starting out. 5 hours on a song is a lot for you? That's really very little time if you're trying to get a quality production.



I know, but he didn't ask for "tell me how to achieve a super uber epic professional sound", he asked for a blunt simple and stupid explanation. And I cannot get more of a quality production until I buy something for my studio( being an external sound card and a cable ), and I don't have money as I don't have a job and go to school and never get allowance.
#11
Quote by Zeletros
I know, but he didn't ask for "tell me how to achieve a super uber epic professional sound", he asked for a blunt simple and stupid explanation. And I cannot get more of a quality production until I buy something for my studio( being an external sound card and a cable ), and I don't have money as I don't have a job and go to school and never get allowance.


I disagree. You can do plenty to improve your sound. Double track guitars and pan them hard left and right. That right there will make an enormous difference in your sound. Also you could take the time to learn how to EQ instead of just messing around with it. Interfaces are nice, but if you're able to get audio into your computer, you can do a lot. I had to return my interface because it stopped working, and if you want t look at my profile, that's all recorded with just a Guitar-USB cable. Piece of crap, but I make due.
#12
Even be that so, I wouldn't be able to achieve studio standard. I'm content with my lead tone, it's the rhythm distortion that sucks.