#1
... that has the 'playability' of a steel string/electric guitar? Specifically, is there a manufacturer out there that makes a nylon string guitar that effectively sounds like a traditional classical nylon string guitar -- but the guitar has a narrower longer neck (as would be consistent with electric guitars/steel string guitars)?

I really LOVE the sound of the nylon string, but I find the shorter wider neck very challenging to play well.
#3
Cool -- seems like you're paying a bit for the synth electronics though. Any others out there?
#4
Quote by donniedark

I really LOVE the sound of the nylon string, but I find the shorter wider neck very challenging to play well.

Classic guitars don't have shorter scale lengths than electrics, heck mine is 665mm, that's 15mm longer than a stock Strat. Most nylons are 650mm same as Strat and longer than PRS guitars or LPs.
#5
Nylon strings are thick, the instrument is just easier to play because of the width. You don't wanna change it. If you play a classical guitar regularly you will quickly get used to the neck width. Nylon stringed guitars have imo much better playability then flat-top steel string acoustics.
#6
Nylon stringed guitars can't have smaller width necks. The reason being that the strings are very low tension compared to steel stringed guitars. This means that when plucked, the strings vibrate in a much larger elliptical pattern than a streel string would. If the neck were thinner, the strings would touch when played harder.
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#7
Just practise. It'll come. Don't look for solutions for your technical inability in a different type of instrument, but in a different type of practice. Be a man.
#8
Quote by captivate
Nylon stringed guitars can't have smaller width necks. The reason being that the strings are very low tension compared to steel stringed guitars. This means that when plucked, the strings vibrate in a much larger elliptical pattern than a streel string would. If the neck were thinner, the strings would touch when played harder.

That's a very much secondary reason for the difference, if at all. Primarily, the neck is wider to facilitate the technical demands required for the clear separation of musical voices. Too close together and the fingers of the left hand risk inadvertently touching adjacent strings that may be required to sound.
Last edited by R.Christie at Jul 9, 2010,