#1
What level is needed to be able to write basic metal and other genres? I know basic stuff like main chord structure's and scales and a bit on modes. Is that enough to be able to lay down guitar pieces for songs the equivalent of like an Iron Maiden track?(yeah, I know thats not basic but its what I'm aiming for as of now)
Or does it not depend on theory knowledge but also on how good the music that a person creates is? ( I mean that although obviously the music should sound right, that that takes priority over the theory part. Like I know some songs of Nirvana's are totally out of key, yet its good music)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#2
Pick key

Know relative major/minor

write?
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#3
needed? none.

recommended? as much as you can learn.

at least learn about the notes (and where they lie on the fretboard), chord construction, keys, and intervals.

yeah, it doesn't really depend on theory knowledge, but trust me, if you know it well and can apply it, it really helps.
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#4
Quote by Slapp62
What level is needed to be able to write basic metal and other genres?


level ZERO

Music theory is a field of study, not a compositional guide.

don't let that stop you from getting into it though.
shred is gaudy music
#6
Quote by AeolianWolf
needed? none.

recommended? as much as you can learn.

at least learn about the notes (and where they lie on the fretboard), chord construction, keys, and intervals.

yeah, it doesn't really depend on theory knowledge, but trust me, if you know it well and can apply it, it really helps.

This.

And GuitarMunky.
#7
Hey if you can stum 3 Chords then your set, Just look at AC DC ... JK
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#8
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#9
ok i got it, thanks
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#10
I'm with wolf on this one. There are plenty of musicians that write great music without knowing a damn thing, and then there are musicians that spend their entire lives learning music theory.

Learn as much as you can, and if you don't find it useful, move on.

The things I use most often are:

Scales
Chords
Intervals
Cadences

Get a good handle on those and you'll be able to write some pretty good songs.
#11
you don't necessarily need to know any theory at all to write music. Music theory will definetly help you know what sounds good, and will help a ton in your music writing in general, but not required.
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get back in the kitchen"
#13
My personal opinion is that theory just is an explanation of what you naturally learn over time from listening to music and playing an instrument.

My other opinion is that just use whatever sounds good to you, don't worry if it falls in with a certain set of rules.
#15
Quote by Slapp62
What level is needed to be able to write basic metal and other genres? I know basic stuff like main chord structure's and scales and a bit on modes. Is that enough to be able to lay down guitar pieces for songs the equivalent of like an Iron Maiden track?(yeah, I know thats not basic but its what I'm aiming for as of now)
Or does it not depend on theory knowledge but also on how good the music that a person creates is? ( I mean that although obviously the music should sound right, that that takes priority over the theory part. Like I know some songs of Nirvana's are totally out of key, yet its good music)



It sounds like you are trying to cut to the chase. Like get just enough to do x.

Honestly thats not a good approach at all. You cannot quantify theory like filling a gas tank. You learn it or you don't. You can't fill up and measure 8.8564 gallons of theory and voila, instant Maiden.

You cannot have results without putting in the work. Everything else is a pipe dream. Either decide to learn it and applying it, or don't, but theres no magic formula thats going to guarantee you anything except work and practice and dedication to what you do.

Best,

Sean