#1
I've always wondered if people who use light gauges strings because they are easier to play are at a disadvantage compared to people who play with heavier strings (more finger strength, etc.)

What do you guys think?
Last edited by zincabopataurio at Jul 7, 2010,
#2
I like the feel
plus w/ a 25.5 scale neck on my Ibanez V there is a perfect amount of tension and no slag w/ a really low action
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#3
...say what now? I've always found thicker strings easier to play than lighter gauge strings.
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#4
Well, light gauge strings fail at any form of drop tuning, and I don't find heavy strings much harder to play (if at all) so I prefer heavies anyway. On the other hand, light top heavy bottom strings are probably good for their versatility.

But...
Do the material of the strings make a big difference to playability?
IDK
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#6
Quote by slayerfrk
i play .008 to .038 i just feel safer when i do super high bends, it also feels easier to play fast than with thick strings

Lets say you were given a guitar with .10 gauge strings, would you still be able to play just as good, or would it be significantly harder to play? Would you consider that a disadvantage?
Last edited by zincabopataurio at Jul 7, 2010,
#7
Quote by slayerfrk
i play .008 to .038 i just feel safer when i do super high bends, it also feels easier to play fast than with thick strings

As in .38 is your lowest string? How is it easier to play? The way the string pushes ack on your pick hand?

IDK, I can't rememer buying strings smaller than .10s, this may change when I get an acoustic though.

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#8
I play 9 gauge strings, on a 25.5" scale length, in C standard. They're really loose, and pretty easy to bend also. I find no disadcantage in my playing, though
#9
Kind of, because it would be harder for them to play guitars with heavier strings. But when they have their OWN guitar, why would they need to do that? The whole thing it just a balance between tension and thickness of tone.
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#11
I personally hate super light strings. Much less tone, and the really only advantage is speed and the obvious perks of using smaller gauges.

I have .009's on my Dean at the moment and while they are much easier to shred and bend with, they seem to lack a little tone but maybe it's just me. When I get my strat i'm probably going to start with some 10s or 11's and see if that solves the trick, because I must admit I like the ease of bends, but the tone from bends with heavier gauges is even greater if you can pull it off.

To summarize my opinion, I really don't like the feel of super light strings but appreciate the convenience for bends. thicker = tone.
Last edited by Funk Monk at Jul 8, 2010,
#12
"Hard" or "easy" to play is much more a function of how the instrument is set up than what string gauges are used.
That being said, some instruments respond better to one or the other. A big, stout dreadnought guitar will likely sound better overall with a medium string.
Putting those same strings on a lightly-built old "parlor" guitar might risk damage....

Also, it depends what you are playing. If you're banging away trying to cut through a bunch of other instruments in a string band...You need some power and projection.
However, if you're playing delicate fingerstyle pieces in a small room...

My current axe came with light-gauge strings, and I'm liking them. My old fingers don't get quite so sore....
#13
Quote by zincabopataurio
Lets say you were given a guitar with .10 gauge strings, would you still be able to play just as good, or would it be significantly harder to play? Would you consider that a disadvantage?


it would defenitly be harder to play, i cant play in store guitars at all, the way they are set up (action and strings) makes it impossible for me to play ANYTHING on them, even something as simple as an Eminor pentatonic scale lol
#14
Quote by slayerfrk
it would defenitly be harder to play, i cant play in store guitars at all, the way they are set up (action and strings) makes it impossible for me to play ANYTHING on them, even something as simple as an Eminor pentatonic scale lol
Wow, that could be a problem later when you want to demo guitars...