#1
My dad had family over the other day and he insisted I show them my room, and while my cousins were looking at it one of them tripped over my cable which just so happened to be attached to my guitar, making the guitar (11-hole stratocaster if you wanted to know) slam, face-first, into the ground. It still works and everything, but one of the screws popped out and now the hole is too wide for it to fit back in snugly (that's what she said).

Is there any way I could fix this?

EDIT: The screw that fell out was one of the 11 pickguard screws.
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Quote by thrashdeth
I love a Dimebag tone just as much as anyone else. I'm Definitely considering a spider.
#2
im sure its playable still
but you could just fill it and put the screw in
#3
It is playable, but the fact that a screw is missing there bothers me.

And what might I fill it with?
Fender Deluxe Player Strat
Fender Musicmaster
Takamine EAN10C
B-52 AT-100
Jet City JCA20H
MXR Phase 90
PolyTune Mini
Strymon El Capistan
Quote by thrashdeth
I love a Dimebag tone just as much as anyone else. I'm Definitely considering a spider.
#4
Break off a matchstick inside the hole then put the screw back in.
#5
I hope you're serious.
Fender Deluxe Player Strat
Fender Musicmaster
Takamine EAN10C
B-52 AT-100
Jet City JCA20H
MXR Phase 90
PolyTune Mini
Strymon El Capistan
Quote by thrashdeth
I love a Dimebag tone just as much as anyone else. I'm Definitely considering a spider.
#6
Ah heck, I'm not sure how that could make it worse. I'll give it a shot some time.
Fender Deluxe Player Strat
Fender Musicmaster
Takamine EAN10C
B-52 AT-100
Jet City JCA20H
MXR Phase 90
PolyTune Mini
Strymon El Capistan
Quote by thrashdeth
I love a Dimebag tone just as much as anyone else. I'm Definitely considering a spider.
#7
Did you slap your cousin silly?

Anyways, you can try and fill it with just about anything...maybe paper? Wood sounds like a good bet though. I like that match idea.
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#8
I think you should bang it up some more. Banged up instruments are awesome.
#9
He's serious. Common quick fixes for a stripped wood screw hole are matchsticks, a toothpick, or filling it in with a mixture of sawdust and glue and redrilling it.

The sawdust and glue method is the most permanent and is the most professional looking repair, but you should know how to work with wood and drills before doing it.

Edit: I should mention that when using the matchstick or toothpick in the hole method, that you only need to fill the hole enough to let the screw's edges bite into the wood. Don't fill up the hole entirely with matchstick/toothpicks before inserting the screw or you might be looking at splitting the wood of the guitar body because of the pressure caused by putting the screw in.
Last edited by Mach42 at Jul 7, 2010,
#10
Quote by Mach42
He's serious. Common quick fixes for a stripped wood screw hole are matchsticks, a toothpick, or filling it in with a mixture of sawdust and glue and redrilling it.

The sawdust and glue method is the most permanent and is the most professional looking repair, but you should know how to work with wood before doing it.

+1 to all of those, sawdust and wood glue mixture will look the best (although you will never see it.
#11
Generally, you would fill it with wood filler, matchstick, toothpick, or 1/8" dowel rod (or larger) depending on size and location of the screw hole. I don't suggest wood filler for anything that you're going to screw into, it crumbles, & has no holding capability. Wood glue + sawdust can work on a small hole, but is not a good fix for a large hole that will need to have a decent holding capacity for a screw unless you have experience & can get the right mix of glue & sawdust... too much glue & it can take days to dry all the way through & will shrink as the glue dries, too much sawdust, & it'll crumble like wood filler when you screw back into it.

If the hole is irregularly shaped, you might want to drill it out on a drill press if you have one available and use the dowel rod method.

Put a drop of yellow wood glue, or super glue gel into the hole before filling it.

If the hole is close to an edge, i.e. less than 1/4" for a #4 or smaller screw, 1/2" for a #6 or larger screw, then it's best to pre-drill the repaired hole (after the glue sets) before screwing into it, otherwise, you may split the body at the edge and have a bigger repair to deal with...
#12
Personally if I was you I wouldn't worry about repairing the hole. If it's just one of the 11 screws, then it really doesn't matter functionally. If it's just a looks thing, just take the pick guard off, put a drop of glue on the underside of the screw head (just enough to hold it to the pickguard) and screw the pickguard back on.

The screw will just sit in the wide hole and the bit of glue will hold it to the pickguard so it doesn't fall out. It will look like a functional screw even though it isn't.
#13
you should kick it some more. guitars sound the best when they are a little beat.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer