#1
Of all things, I know, lol. This should be the simplest thing ever, but I've only recently had my "OH!" moment with chord progressions and how to use 7th, 9th, sus(2+4) chords, etc. going off the Major/Minor progressions. My question is with power chords how does that work as they are neither major / minor? In a major scale it goes like I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-vii*, how do power chords work into this? For example, in the key of C major if you were to go from I-IV-V-ii-I would you use C5-F5-G5-D5-C5? Sorry for the simplistic question, but I don't know how you work them in if they are not Major or Minor. I feel like a dumbass since these are probably the easiest chords ever to use , but I'm curious. Thank you.
#3
you just use the standard power chord and not worry about tonality (major or minor). that's usually what i do when it really doesn't matter. if you're doing acoustic, however, it helps to put tonality in your chords. it just sounds more full and complete.
Gear
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
Boss ME-70
Martin DC-1E
Peavey Classic 30
Greer Amps Relic Drive

"Do you practice UG Blackism? W e do."

Drown out the noise...
... KILL DURDEN!
#4
Power chord progressions still imply a key depending on which ones are played even though you aren't playing the chords' third to make it as obvious. The fact you're starting on C going to F then G to D and resolving on C strongly implies key of C. Only other one I can see that would apply anyway off the top of my head any way is Key of F, but it way more strongly leans toward C.

I guess the best way to look at it would be to look at the root notes themselves. Like if I played the riff to Self Estee by Offspring A5, F5, C5, G5 - the Am key is implied with it. From the cirlce of 5ths it aint gonna be G or on up cuz of that standard non sharp F. Ya could it technically be key of F or semi-Bb? Sure, but what it most "sounds" like from order of chords and how it resolves is Am. Hope that helps
#5
Typically you can take a pentatonic/blues scale and play it with fifths. You can do a the entire diatonic scale with fifths too, since they aren't minor or major and every chord in diatonic harmony has the root and the perfect fifth. This applies to fourths as well.
#6
Look at the other layers of the music, the melody will usually provide the tonality in this case. Also, look at how the chord progression resolves or moves, if you're hearing perfect cadences then you'll know which key you're in etc. It really depends on how the progression flows and the other layers but that's the easy way.
#7
Power Chords are technically not chords, a chord is 3 different notes played all at the same time. A power chord does contain three notes, but two of these notes are not different notes, just different octaves.

Because of this, power chords have no tonality, which means they are able to fit into any scale, Major or Minor, without any problems, because they do not affect the major or minor quality of the scale in any way.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#8
Quote by sites.nick
Power Chords are technically not chords, a chord is 3 different notes played all at the same time. A power chord does contain three notes, but two of these notes are not different notes, just different octaves.

Because of this, power chords have no tonality, which means they are able to fit into any scale, Major or Minor, without any problems, because they do not affect the major or minor quality of the scale in any way.



This, but for the sake of the question, we're going to have to treat them as chords even though technically they're called harmonies or diads.
#9
Thanks guys! Exactly the answers I was looking for.. thanks. And yes, I know Power Chords aren't technically chords, but I didn't know how to phrase it otherwise hahaha. Thanks again!!