#1
I am still fairly new to the bass, but i plan to be playing some very basic fills for some praise and worship songs using basically half and quarter notes. I have access to the chords and was just wondering the best method was in order to write these fills while staying in the same key.

An example of what i have is:

Sing my love

Intro: C, F, A, C

Verse 1:
C
Words can never say how much he says my name
F
He calls me lovely
C
No one ever sees the way he looks at me
F
He sees me holy
A
Words can never hold this love that burns my soul
C G A C G A
Heaven holds me, heaven holds me


Thanks much in advance.
#2
...you know, I really want to help you, but its literally impossible. Playing music is something that can be learned but not taught. I mean, a good teacher will give you the tools so you can learn yourself, but nothing anyone posts in this thread is going to substantially help you

That said, just play some random notes in the C scale when going from one note to the next. It sounds to simple to be true, but hey, its where we all started

Also, Mahler5858 would have been a cooler name
Last edited by tubatom868686 at Jul 7, 2010,
#3
Quote by tubatom868686
...you know, I really want to help you, but its literally impossible. Playing music is something that can be learned but not taught. I mean, a good teacher will give you the tools so you can learn yourself, but nothing anyone posts in this thread is going to substantially help you

That said, just play some random notes in the C scale when going from one note to the next. It sounds to simple to be true, but hey, its where we all started

Also, Mahler5858 would have been a cooler name


A little more information about me, is that i do have a fairly decent music background of taking band....alto and baritone sax throughout middle and high school. I know music, and i know the sound that i want to accomplish. Im just referring to say if my guitarist is playing a G chord i know that that they are playing G, B, D, G, B, G.....So if this is the case, can I play any of these notes to stay in key with my guitarist. I already know the rhythms of the notes i want to play, i just need advice on keeping the notes in key.

And btw mauler is an OLD gaming name of mine that stemmed back from the days of playing Perfect Dark on the N64 lol(it was the weapon I performed the best with). Its just kinda stuck ever since.
#4
From what I gather, learning/using scales will help you out.
Call Me Joe
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#5
Quote by mauler5858
A little more information about me, is that i do have a fairly decent music background of taking band....alto and baritone sax throughout middle and high school. I know music, and i know the sound that i want to accomplish. Im just referring to say if my guitarist is playing a G chord i know that that they are playing G, B, D, G, B, G.....So if this is the case, can I play any of these notes to stay in key with my guitarist. I already know the rhythms of the notes i want to play, i just need advice on keeping the notes in key.


You've got it. If a guitarist plays a C Chord you can play a C E or a G and stay perfectly in key behind that chord. Remember you can use passing tones, chromatic movements as well (and although they might be slightly out of key could still sound good).
Also, if you are doing a fill between, say the first two chords:
C - F
You have the notes:
C: C E G
F: F A C
Notice that the C note is static, so in any fills/runs etc you could try to emphasise that note in some way
#7
While I agree with tubatom that this kind of stuff takes practice to learn, there are some pointers that can help.

First off, the song is in C, so any natural note (no flats or sharps) will technically work in the song. You say you know music, so you know that means C, D, E, F, G, A, and B will all work in one way or another. A D or a B will sound a bit more tense if sustained for too long, but as long as you don't play a sharp or flat it will work out okay.

As for the style of music, I play praise and worship music as well, and depending on the context of the worship set, fills should be used in different ways. For instance, when I play with a full band (electric guitars, drums, acoustic guitar, etc.), I tend to throw a few melodic fills in here and there while using some passing tones occasionally but staying close to the root to support the music. However, for a more stripped down set with, say, a bass, acoustic guitarist, drum kit and maybe some keyboards, I tend to play some melodic lines higher up the neck; not anything that's flashy for the sake of being flashy, but an actual moving line to fill up the space due to the sparse instrumentation.

That's just from my personal experience. Everyone else has pretty much said what needs to be said regarding the subject, but I figured I could throw my two-cents worth in.
#8
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Oh wow you're so clever

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#9
If you know rhythm of the fills you want to play and what chords you have to work with then literally just pick a note in the C major scale and it'll fit. Some better than others but you can play whatever you end up liking. As far as technically possible, literally just pick a note in C major, accidentals/chromatic jumps excluded.
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