#1
So I just bid on this guitar because I really wanted an FG 180, and it's in pretty poor conditioning. To be honest, I don't really mind all the dings and such, but I'm afraid that it may affect the sound of it, so does anyone know what are some good tips for restoring and fixing up guitars (filling in cracks and such), can shops do it?
#3
luthiers can do amazing things when it comes to restoration.

whether you can - or should - do it yourself would be another issue. check at frets.com for lots of handy tips on almost everything to do with guitars.
#4
I would be worried about what appears to be a crack near the back of the headstock. It may be surface only, or it may be incipient failure.
Go to the Frets.Com site:
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/pagelist.html#Musician

To see what's involved in refinishing and such; it's much more involved than you might think.

If the guitar was otherwise sound, I would clean it up a bit, put some strings on it, and play it as is. Those old Yamahas are pretty much bulletproof (being plywood) and you're not going to increase the value much.
Unless of course you just want it for a project guitar.
#5
Quote by Bikewer
I would be worried about what appears to be a crack near the back of the headstock. It may be surface only, or it may be incipient failure.
Go to the Frets.Com site:
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/pagelist.html#Musician

To see what's involved in refinishing and such; it's much more involved than you might think.

If the guitar was otherwise sound, I would clean it up a bit, put some strings on it, and play it as is. Those old Yamahas are pretty much bulletproof (being plywood) and you're not going to increase the value much.
Unless of course you just want it for a project guitar.

The strings are a given, for the three that are attached, they're rusty as hell. One of my main concerns are the tubing knobs, they look really rusty and some are bent out of place a little, I'm worried they won't turn properly. Can I get them replace or make them turn easier?
#6
Quote by Bikewer
If the guitar was otherwise sound, I would clean it up a bit, put some strings on it, and play it as is.

Me too.
Many beaten up (but otherwise beautiful) guitars have been ruined by trying to "restore" them. Unless it's about to break itself in half, let your new/old guitar wear its battle scars with pride.
#7
Open, non-sealed tuners such as those are pretty cheap and easy to replace. In many cases, you may be able to find a good used set at your dealer. They often keep boxes of old/salvaged parts.
I often get the tuners for my cigar-box guitars that way.