#1
Hi guys,

Today I was playing around on my guitar played a "chord" that sounded really good and I'm thinking did I just make that up or is it a chord I don't know about yet.

Here it is.




030030
#2
Tuning? It is a chord, do you want to know the scale/ name of the chord?
Sounds jazzy, but I really need the tuning that you're using
Last edited by Tsukuyomi789 at Jul 8, 2010,
#7
ECDGDE
Your roots are probably going to be E or D.
Try D mixolidean, or maybe D7 scales over it.
Depending on the feel your going for. It sounds like one of those chords that are niether major nor minor, but it's jazzy. Again, whichever feel your going for. If your going for a happier feel, use mixolidean, or D7 for a darker jazzy feel.
I'm not too good with getting scales and chords right, and I couldn't name it if I tried. But try one of those scales over it.
#8
Quote by DavidBenyamin
Your playing:

E (root) C (5th) D (7th) G (min3th) D (7th) E (root)

So its E min7th


you've got the notes right, but C is a m6 above E, not a P5. a P5 above E is B.

your notes are C E G D. depending on context, the name would change - but i'd say more often than not it would probably function as a Cmajadd9 chord. built off of E, you could see the C as a B# and treat it as the altered chord Em7(#5). what it's called depends on how it is used in the progression.

like i said, though, more often than not you'd use this as a Cmajadd9 chord.

EDIT:

Quote by Tsukuyomi789
ECDGDE
Your roots are probably going to be E or D.
Try D mixolidean, or maybe D7 scales over it.
Depending on the feel your going for. It sounds like one of those chords that are niether major nor minor, but it's jazzy. Again, whichever feel your going for. If your going for a happier feel, use mixolidean, or D7 for a darker jazzy feel.
I'm not too good with getting scales and chords right, and I couldn't name it if I tried. But try one of those scales over it.


no. you're just going to confuse the poor guy.

the scale he plays over it is dependent on the other chords in the progression. if this chord is static, then he'd have to decide which note he'd want to be the root (though the most natural root here is C, even with the E in the bass), and play a scale accordingly.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Last edited by AeolianWolf at Jul 8, 2010,
#9
looks like you got your answer. TS there is never such thing as a no chord if you strum 2 or more notes that is a chord, if you strum all open chords EADGBe that is a EM7add11 chord
JUST ANOTHER ANNOYING BIG STATUS
Last edited by ibrahimasood at Jul 8, 2010,
#10
Quote by ibrahimasood
looks like you got your answer. TS there is never such thing as a no chord if you strum 2 or more notes that is a chord, if you strum all open chords EADGBe that is a EM7add11 chord


really, a chord is 3 or more notes. 2 notes is either an interval or a dyad. but yes, he does have a point. if it has at least 3 different notes, it can be notated somehow.

sometimes the nomenclature gets really convoluted, but it can be notated.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#11
That could be C add9 or Em7#5
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#12
Quote by AeolianWolf
really, a chord is 3 or more notes. 2 notes is either an interval or a dyad. but yes, he does have a point. if it has at least 3 different notes, it can be notated somehow.

sometimes the nomenclature gets really convoluted, but it can be notated.



take something like C5 thats is a chord right? I know its the 5th interval. but it is a chord right? sorry if im wrong.
JUST ANOTHER ANNOYING BIG STATUS
#13
Quote by ibrahimasood
take something like C5 thats is a chord right? I know its the 5th interval. but it is a chord right? sorry if im wrong.


you don't need to be sorry for being wrong -- you learn by asking questions.

even though an X5 (where X is any note) is often called a power chord, the reality is that it's a misnomer -- this isn't really a chord. it's either a dyad or an interval of a perfect fifth. it becomes a chord when a third note is added to it.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#14
Quote by AeolianWolf
you don't need to be sorry for being wrong -- you learn by asking questions.

even though an X5 (where X is any note) is often called a power chord, the reality is that it's a misnomer -- this isn't really a chord. it's either a dyad or an interval of a perfect fifth. it becomes a chord when a third note is added to it.


You are, right thank you.
JUST ANOTHER ANNOYING BIG STATUS