#1
Just reading some theory and I'd like to make sure I'm understanding Modes correctly. Also - here's the article I'm reading: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/the_guide_to/the_ultimate_guide_to_guitar_chapter_iv_1_scales_-_diatonic_modes_in_theory.html

Correct me if I'm wrong: I've learned how to construct my diatonic Major and Minor scales, and basically the modes are just the same intervals moved to a new root note in that diatonic scale that creates a whole new scale due to all the note orders changing, but intervals shifting and staying the same. The scale itself is still the same structure shifted, but the notes themselves change to create the unique sound.

I'm not fully sure I understand why Modes are truly important right now, but other than Major and Minor scales, it seems like these are how you further expand upon scales to create new and interesting sounds? Are modes the last steps in getting the rest of the scales or are there other ways to construct diatonic scales beyond Major/Minor and the modes of them all over the fretboard?

I'm guessing there are other non-diatonic scales out there such as the pentatonics that are constructed differently from these diatonic ones so that could be considered other ways to create scales, but aren't those only formed by using the diatonics first and then removing the extra intervals?
Last edited by Exodus04 at Jul 8, 2010,
#2
Quote by Exodus04
Correct me if I'm wrong: I've learned how to construct my diatonic Major and Minor scales, and basically the modes are just the same intervals moved to a new root note in that diatonic scale that creates a whole new scale due to all the note orders changing, but intervals shifting and staying the same. The scale itself is still the same structure shifted, but the notes themselves change to create the unique sound.


if you're saying something like

Ab major: Ab Bb C Db Eb F G Ab
Bb dorian: Bb C Db Eb F G Ab Bb

then yes. that is right.

Quote by Exodus04
I'm not fully sure I understand why Modes are truly important right now, but other than Major and Minor scales, it seems like these are how you further expand upon scales to create new and interesting sounds? Are modes the last steps in getting the rest of the scales or are there other ways to construct diatonic scales beyond Major/Minor and the modes of them all over the fretboard?


i wouldn't say that modes are important at all, really - but composition using modes is somewhat different that tonal composition. and i don't know what you mean by "the rest of the scales".

Quote by Exodus04
I'm guessing there are other non-diatonic scales out there such as the pentatonics that are constructed differently from these diatonic ones so that could be considered other ways to create scales, but aren't those only formed by using the diatonics first and then removing the extra intervals?


yes, that's right. really, though, you can take any permutation of notes and consider it a scale -- not every possibility will work, though, because with some permutations, harmony becomes either impossible or unsuitable for practical use.
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Last edited by AeolianWolf at Jul 12, 2010,
#5
Quote by tenfold
dia = 7.
penta = 5.

no it doesn't.

hepta means 7.

diatonic means something else but I can't remember the exact definition and i have to go to work now
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#6
Quote by steven seagull
no it doesn't.

hepta means 7.

diatonic means something else but I can't remember the exact definition and i have to go to work now

Right, my bad. There's several definitions but I believe diatonic means using only the 7 notes of a scale. Maybe someone can find the right definition.
#9
A diatonic scale is composed of 5 steps and 2 half steps, which means they must have 7 notes. If the pentatonic has only 5 (therefore the name), why should it be diatonic? Get it?

About your modal question, modes are always diatonic scales, yes, scales. Like this, Aeolian mode is nothing more than the natural minor scale, or as many of you know, A minor scale (ABCDEFGA). If we pick up mixolidian, for ex, you will see that is nothing else but the G major scale. It keeps going on and on.


UBER MASSIVE EDIT FOR STUPID POST


Quote by tenfold
dia = 7.
penta = 5.



What? wait, isn't like penta=5 and hepta=7?
Last edited by Baraga at Jul 11, 2010,
#10
Quote by tenfold
Right, my bad. There's several definitions but I believe diatonic means using only the 7 notes of a scale. Maybe someone can find the right definition.


our word diatonic comes from the greek diatonikós, literally meaning "via tones". the classical definition is basically a set of seven notes arranged so that the half steps and whole steps form a particular order (WWHWWWH and any of its shifted permutations, i.e., the modes). in modern tonal harmony, the harmonic and melodic minor scales are considered diatonic to a minor key, though i don't think i have to tell anyone that.

that's pretty much diatonic in a nutshell.
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#11
Quote by AeolianWolf
our word diatonic comes from the greek diatonikós, literally meaning "via tones". the classical definition is basically a set of seven notes arranged so that the half steps and whole steps form a particular order (WWHWWWH and any of its shifted permutations, i.e., the modes). in modern tonal harmony, the harmonic and melodic minor scales are considered diatonic to a minor key, though i don't think i have to tell anyone that.

that's pretty much diatonic in a nutshell.


This.

"Diatonic" is the opposite of "chromatic".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diatonic_and_chromatic