#1
I bought a Warmoth Strat neck (Rosewood over Maple neck) and it had a very spunky, chimey, plush, bright tone to it. I then got a thicker strat neck, for more comfort, with the same specs (except I said dark Indian Rosewood instead of just Indian Rosewood), and it has a much warmer, fuller tone to it without the chime and spunk when i strum a chord. So, I'm going to try one more time and purchase a new neck from Warmoth. I'm thinking about getting the neck slightly thinner than the original neck I had, but with a wider nut so that the volume of the new neck will be similar to that of the original neck (with the tone I liked) and it wont be too small for my hands. I'm also thinking about getting the new neck quarter sawn to help my odds that it will have that chime to it.

In order to further increase the odds of getting the chime tone I like, I'm also thinking about possibly getting an ebony back instead of the maple. A maple fingerboard over a maple back is simply too bright for my liking. I don't want a tinty tone so much as a nice chime. However, I'm nervous that the black ebony will get too hot when i play outside and either burn my hands and/or cause the neck to warp a lot. So I would go with the lighter brown ebony that warmoth offers.

Thanks!
#2
I just read somewhere that maple has a snappy bright tone to it, while ebony has more of a clear bright tone to it... anyone know?

Any Ideas?
#4
I'm willing to bet $10,000 that you couldn't tell the difference between the two if your eyes were closed.

After the (much) bigger factors are tone are worked out, (Amp, cab, pickups) then worry about the guitar for tone.

The one big problem I could see with ebony as a neck wood is that it is much more dense than maple, so your neck would be heavier. It could make your guitar a nuisance to play.
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#5
Your idea sounds good on paper, but ebony doesn't make a good neck wood at all. Its quite light and won't take the tension that the main neck wood is required to take. Personally I'd try Goncalo Alves (sp?) its a very pretty wood when oiled nicely and has a very bright sound to it.
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#6
Quote by opticon
Your idea sounds good on paper, but ebony doesn't make a good neck wood at all. Its quite light and won't take the tension that the main neck wood is required to take. Personally I'd try Goncalo Alves (sp?) its a very pretty wood when oiled nicely and has a very bright sound to it.


Uhm, what?

Ebony is extremely heavy, and dense. It has one of the highest janka ratings. It's used in necks plenty, and it's plenty strong. Please make sure your posting accurate information.


Btw, Goncalo alves janka rating is 1840, Ebony is double with 3600, and Hard Maple is 1450.


In regards to TS, maple (when used enough in the guitar) can produce a very irritating bright tone, while ebony in general, has more of a clear-chime like brightness to it.
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Last edited by metalwarrior40 at Jul 8, 2010,
#7
Quote by metalwarrior40
Uhm, what?

Ebony is extremely heavy, and dense. It has one of those highest janka ratings. It's used in necks a lot, as it's extremely strong. Please make sure your posting accurate information.


Btw, Goncalo alves janka rating is 1840, Ebony is double with 3600, and Hard Maple is 1450.


#8
Seriously, don't obsess over the wood too much, just go with a maple neck/ash body combo or someshit, and use ebony on the fretboard, because it's quite dense, using a lot of it would 1. be a waste of money, and 2. ruin the playing experiance of the guitar.

As was previously stated, worry more about the pickups and amplification then the wood.
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#9
Worrying about neck dimensions affecting tone?

Seriously, every piece of wood is different. I bet one neck was just more dense than the other or something. Go spend your money on some nice pickups.
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#10
I'd like to point out that regardless of densities, blah blah ratings, and dimensional effects on tone, getting a piece of ebony that ****ing huge is going to be A) impossible or B) really expensive. And it's not listed as a choice at Warmoth.
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#11
Quote by xstillspinninx
I'd like to point out that regardless of densities, blah blah ratings, and dimensional effects on tone, getting a piece of ebony that ****ing huge is going to be A) impossible or B) really expensive. And it's not listed as a choice at Warmoth.

in the showcase section at warmoth, i KNOW I've seen an all ebony neck before

though..i don't have much input on the whole tone argument going on..just sayin..they have offered it before
#13
You know, even necks made of the exact same kinds of woods with the same dimensions won't sound exactly the same. So even though the woods will help shape the tone, the wood itself even of the same species can sound different.


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#14
I'd say just get the neck that feels the best and plays the best and get some good pickups that fit your tone and an eq pedal.

For me personally if I'm playing on a quality fender amp with an american strat it's hard not to get a great chimey tone, and a good eq pedal just for fine tuning your tone.
#15
Thanks...

In terms of pickups, etc.... Everything about my setup with the first neck is the same with the second neck. Only difference is the thickness of the maple back and a darker rosewood on the newer neck and yet HUGE difference in tone! I also noted that there are more brown stripes and they are straighter on the new neck. On the old neck there are less brown stripes and there are more "wavy" brown lines on it. This is probably an indicator of where the wood came from on the tree and thus density.
Last edited by ndogg123 at Jul 9, 2010,
#16
Did you not understand anything we just said? Stop worrying about the god damn neck and just change your pickups or get an EQ pedal.
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#17
Quote by Mike-T93
Did you not understand anything we just said? Stop worrying about the god damn neck and just change your pickups or get an EQ pedal.

Mechanically added highs =/= naturally added highs. If he wants to spend the money let him spend the money.

TS: Maybe try a different fretboard still in the Rosewood family, but with a brighter sound like Cocobolo.
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