#1
So I would really like to learn some form of boxing or martial arts. Ive been doing some research but there are so many different kinds I don't really know which type would best suit my goals and body type.

I really want to learn something that is pretty even in self defense and in attacking or whatever you call it. Something that would give me a definite edge in a fight.

As for my physical attributes I am about 250-260 lbs, 6'1", larged boned, fairly muscular, and not really fat, but diffidently thick and stalky. I am not sure if that helps but i figured ide put it anyway.

So pretty much, based on the above, which form of martial arts or boxing would benefit me more and work best for me.

Thanks for any advice.
#2
I don't know much about martial arts, so I'm just gonna go out on a limb here and say kung-fu.
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#3
i did karate a few years ago, there were BIG ****ers there, and thats about defending yourself first, then attacking wherever's open on your opponent.
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#4
Muay Thai or just plain old boxing should do in most situations. For self defence, the only thing you're going to take from a ground based/grappling martial art is how to stop the fight going to the ground and how to get up quickly.

Ideally you'd train in multiple styles, but they should do for fitness and most instances where you'll need to defend yourself.
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Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#5
Quote by ChucklesMginty
For self-defense only, I'd recommend Aikido. I don't know the specifics, but it's basically to do with using your enemy's strength against them. It has a very peaceful philosophy behind it, so it's really less like fighting in my opinion.



Aikido is a martial art based of the sword movements of the samurai. It uses circles and straight lines to remove a persons muscular strength and replace it with the strength of balance and form. With Aikido, you can beat someone twice your size without using and muscular force whatsoever.

This all sounds good, but the techniques are extremely complicated, so you need to train your ass off before it becomes even remotely useful. If you just want to defend yourself, I'd go with boxing and/or wrestling. It sounds like you have a good body for it, and it's way simpler than the eastern martial arts, so you'll be able you use it in a real world scenario much sooner.

If however, you are willing to dedicate a large amount of time to training, Aikido might work. The designer, Morohie Ushiba(?), was really short, so a lot of the techniques require you to go under peoples arms and have a very low center of gravity (this gave me a problem, since I'm 6'7) but there are techniques that work well and can be pulled off by someone my size.

Other martial arts that I have found to be useful are Wing Chun, Karate (be careful, a lot of the schools outside of japan are very watered down and pretty much useless) and Hapkido (never taken it, but I know someone who has).
#6
If you're focused on self-defense, look into Krav Maga. It's what the Israeli commandos use. From what I've seen, it involves a lot of James Bond-type shit.
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#7
Quote by rgrockr
If you're focused on self-defense, look into Krav Maga. It's what the Israeli commandos use. From what I've seen, it involves a lot of James Bond-type shit.


it's used by the special forces because it's developed to incapacitate an attacker by any means. That's not good for self defence. That leaves you open to an assault charge yourself.

that's if you happen to get on a course that isn't being taught by a guy who took a week long course.
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Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#8
Well it depends where you live and what's available.

By me Tae Kwon Do and Karate are mostly what is available. At my university there are clubs and classes for almost any kind of sport martial arts or just plain boxing.

I take karate and it is great all around. But its not about fighting, its about self discipline and balance and form. Tae Kwon Do is less about form and more about "results" this is why its so popular in America where parents take their kids to it to advance in belts, but its not very useful or takes as much discipline.
#9
Just learn MMA basics. There's a reason the guys that adhered to strict, one-dimensional disciplines stopped competing in UFC. Learn to box, learn to sprawl, learn how to fall into the full guard and learn basic submissions like the arm bar and rear naked choke. Really though if you're someone who has enough control over their impulses to have not been in plenty of fights already, you're on a really good winning streak and you'd do best to stay on it. An intelligent person has no excuse to get into a fight, except for on very rare occasions when it's unavoidable.
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#10
Jujitsu, throwing and joint locks/holds.

Or as a few people said, the basics of multiple forms, then have one that you're more comfortable with and could use as a sort of fallback.
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#11
Quote by Martyr's Prayer
Just learn MMA basics. There's a reason the guys that adhered to strict, one-dimensional disciplines stopped competing in UFC. .


Oh the reason being tv show ratings? Nobody wants to watch a couple of black belts sparring for a tv show.
#12
Quote by dougl126
Oh the reason being tv show ratings? Nobody wants to watch a couple of black belts sparring for a tv show.



A lot of MMA fighters are black belts. Black belt doesn't mean your a master, it means you can start learning.
#13
Quote by Lemoninfluence
it's used by the special forces because it's developed to incapacitate an attacker by any means. That's not good for self defence. That leaves you open to an assault charge yourself.

that's if you happen to get on a course that isn't being taught by a guy who took a week long course.


If you can't defend yourself with Krav Maga you're doing it wrong
#14
I meant a black belt in one form particularly. Not many in America would pay for pay per view karate as opposed to high energy cage fighting, etc.

True MMA fighters are skilled in many fighting styles, but they've been doing many styles for many years as a job.

If you want to get something out of martial arts then pick one and focus on it.

Oh and I dont think there are any or very many Krav Maga schools.
Last edited by dougl126 at Jul 8, 2010,
#15
Quote by dougl126
I meant a black belt in one form particularly. Not many in America would pay for pay per view karate as opposed to high energy cage fighting, etc.

True MMA fighters are skilled in many fighting styles, but they've been doing many styles for many years as a job.

If you want to get something out of martial arts then pick one and focus on it.


Oh and I dont think there are any or very many Krav Maga schools.


why?

so you can 'master' it only to have your arse handed to you by someone who's trained half your time and in many different arts?

And the reason for 1 dimensional fighters being crap in MMA isn't because of TV ratings, it's because knowing only one discipline leaves you vulnerable to many of the thousands of styles out there.

Quote by Local666Union
If you can't defend yourself with Krav Maga you're doing it wrong

there's defending yourself and then there's permanently blinding an attack, leaving yourself open to a GBH charge.
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Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#16
Quote by Lemoninfluence
why?

so you can 'master' it only to have your arse handed to you by someone who's trained half your time and in many different arts?


And this is why, like I already said, if you're someone who has the self control to not get into fights, you should keep that going for you. Because the people with horrible impulse control are the ones who are actually good at fighting because they've done it a lot.

So IMO it's best to learn some basics so that you can at least know what it is you'll be TRYING to do as you get your ass stomped. Of course you could always devote your time - and your good looks - to getting good at fighting. It takes time just like everything else. It will be time spent getting your face deformed.
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#17
Quote by Martyr's Prayer
And this is why, like I already said, if you're someone who has the self control to not get into fights, you should keep that going for you. Because the people with horrible impulse control are the ones who are actually good at fighting because they've done it a lot.

So IMO it's best to learn some basics so that you can at least know what it is you'll be TRYING to do as you get your ass stomped. Of course you could always devote your time - and your good looks - to getting good at fighting. It takes time just like everything else. It will be time spent getting your face deformed.


It's not a case of 'just avoid it'. The idea of training for self defence is to try and ready yourself for situations where you're being attacked. training in one style might give you an advantage over a person with no training at all, but what happens if you've learnt Karate and your mugger happens to know jiu jitsu and gets you to the ground and snaps your wrist? what happens when that loud mouthed arrogant, slightly drunk person at the bar who you happened to bump into did wrestling in high school and ends up sitting on top of you punching your face in?

there's no real point in devoting your time to 'mastering' just one martial art.
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Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#18
Take boxing, kickboxing and muay thai. That kinda stuff. Make you pick a good class/trainer though, make sure you don't end up going to a 'McDojo'.
#19
Quote by Lemoninfluence
It's not a case of 'just avoid it'. The idea of training for self defence is to try and ready yourself for situations where you're being attacked. training in one style might give you an advantage over a person with no training at all, but what happens if you've learnt Karate and your mugger happens to know jiu jitsu and gets you to the ground and snaps your wrist? what happens when that loud mouthed arrogant, slightly drunk person at the bar who you happened to bump into did wrestling in high school and ends up sitting on top of you punching your face in?

there's no real point in devoting your time to 'mastering' just one martial art.


Well an attacker - someone with intent - is going to want something, otherwise they wouldn't be wasting their time. You're not some politician or celebrity, you simply have a wallet. You should know that it's much less costly to simply give them your wallet, BECAUSE you should know that it's retarded to carry large amounts of cash in your wallet.

And you should know not to get too close to the loud mouthed, arrogant bar patron. See what I'm getting at? Life isn't like the movies. You should be able to avoid getting in fights without much a problem. And if you're surprised by the stereotypical dark alley attacker (why were you even in the a dark alley, idiot?), just give them what they want.

But anyways I do agree that mastering one discipline is useless. But I'm just saying that it's more useless to even bother with any of it because you seriously should have no problem avoiding bad situations. Yes, unavoidable situations do happen. But even then you still have the option to just give them what they want or run away.
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#20
Quote by Lemoninfluence

there's defending yourself and then there's permanently blinding an attack, leaving yourself open to a GBH charge.

(just googled GBH, pardon me if I didn't get it right)
You're not going to get charged with anything with the material we learn here.
ofc you can easily do a lot of damage to an attacker within seconds but that's not the point of civilian KM...there's a hugh difference between military KM to civilian KM
#21
Quote by Martyr's Prayer
*words of someone who's never been in a fight before and lives in his own perfect little world*

#22
Quote by Martyr's Prayer
Well an attacker - someone with intent - is going to want something, otherwise they wouldn't be wasting their time. You're not some politician or celebrity, you simply have a wallet. You should know that it's much less costly to simply give them your wallet, BECAUSE you should know that it's retarded to carry large amounts of cash in your wallet.


you do realise that muggers don't really do the whole 'your money or your life' thing right?

And you should know not to get too close to the loud mouthed, arrogant bar patron. See what I'm getting at? Life isn't like the movies. You should be able to avoid getting in fights without much a problem. And if you're surprised by the stereotypical dark alley attacker (why were you even in the a dark alley, idiot?), just give them what they want.


When the bar is filled with them (not uncommon here) it's hard to avoid them all, not to mention you can't always see them from far off, sometimes by the time you find out it's too late and sometimes they find you.

But anyways I do agree that mastering one discipline is useless. But I'm just saying that it's more useless to even bother with any of it because you seriously should have no problem avoiding bad situations. Yes, unavoidable situations do happen. But even then you still have the option to just give them what they want or run away.


so then why did you come into the thread?

you concede there are unavoidable situations, the problem is, these are the situations that self defence is concerned with.
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Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#23
Quote by Local666Union
(just googled GBH, pardon me if I didn't get it right)
You're not going to get charged with anything with the material we learn here.
ofc you can easily do a lot of damage to an attacker within seconds but that's not the point of civilian KM...there's a hugh difference between military KM to civilian KM


fair enough then. From what I'd read, eye gouges etc are an integral part of it.

the second problem still remains. it's not likely to be a problem in Israel but in the US the licensing has apparently been a joke. Don't know what it's like over here though.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#24
Well all I'm saying is it's not like the movies. I guess I come from a rather peaceful area or something because I've never been forced into a fight. I've done my share of voluntary fighting that was in good sport, but that's way different. I've been around, I'm 23, I'm not an idiot. Well I mean I'm still responding to this, so maybe I'm wrong. Good night.
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#25
Thanks for all of the help guys, and yea don't worry, I rarely ever get mad at anyone and always try to keep a level head, so its not like i am looking to pummel anyone or anything. But you never know when something could go down, and I just think it would be cool to know and to tell people about and great for fitness benefits. From reading I think boxing or muay thai would be the best for me. Also that Akido stuff sounds like it would be sick to learn, but if its that hard, and i rarely will use it, idk if it would be worth it. Who knows, thanks for all your advice everyone.
#26
I'm actually hoping to learn Krav Maga myself when I turn 16 next week.

It does look like it can get pretty hardcore, but if you're at a point where you have to use it then it does seem more effective than something like capoeira (which is the most useless thing I've ever learned).
Last edited by denfilade at Jul 9, 2010,
#27
If you want quick results, do boxing, boxers are taught to keep attacking and not to let up which throws people who don't know how to fight off and people who don't know what you know. If the person you're fighting knows what you're doing though, you're going to be beat easily no matter how fast you punch.

Martial arts take YEARS to actually be of any proper use but you will find it much better suited to a confrontation on the street where your opponent knows how to fight. Most of the karate dojos you'll find outside of Japan are made of watered down bullshit (lots of dojos encourage you to get to black belt ASAP or train you only in point sparring which is useless in real life) so if you're considering that, be very careful. You don't even need to top the ranks in karate to be good at it, as long as your instructor insists on good technique and has you spar for the sake of sparring instead of training for a point based tournaments, you'll find lots of benefit from it.

EDIT: If you want to get any good at Muay Thai, you're going to have to put your body through hell and back if you want to do all the crazy shit that they do. Those bone breaking kicks take years to develop and you're going to have to condition your entire body like hell if you're going to be spar anyone who does it (Their kicks follow through and they bloody hurt). Also, since Muay Thai's gaining in popularity around the world, you're going to have to watch out for even more McDojos.
Last edited by XianXiuHong at Jul 9, 2010,
#28
I'd recommend Wing Tsung Kung - Fu, after doing 4 years of kickboxing I found it much more interesting and developmental for the mind as well. It teaches discipline as you have to practice the forms used in the defensive and offensive techniques. It's really great for self defence