#1
Alright, so I've got so many songs finished for my band (2 albums and 4 EPs full) but almost nothing recorded. I decided a little while back to set a deadline for this fall to record one of them. The problem is, nobody really knows about us (except a bunch of people at our old school). I was really hoping to release it for free (or donation) but I feel like it'd be a waste because almost nobody (I'd say less than 20 people) would listen to it.

I know it would be more reasonable to play some shows first, but I feel like we need an album before playing. I also thought about recording one of the EPs first, but I think that they wouldn't really describe the band the way the full albums do.

Can anyone give advice, maybe promotion-wise?
#2
id consider recording an ep first, maybe 4 of your best songs, just to get a taste of the band so you can book, etc, and one you get a following, then you can go ahead and record the full length.
it costs alot to record a quality full length-you just want to make sure its going to be completely worth it before you do it
#3
You've got everything ass-backwards. Definitely play shows before you put a cd out. Go down to the local venue and be like "Hey, when's the next (insert genre here) show? We would like to play." Works for me, or get to know the local bands and just talk to them about getting shows. It's kinda stupid to release your art for free (Unless you're Radiohead and rich already), and nobodoy is going to want to pay for a cd by a band they've never heard before. Maybe record a short demo for advertising. One or two songs, but nothing big. After a while people are going to know who you are. My band played only like 3 shows before people started talking about us all the time. It's weird shit to have someone look at you and be like "That's the ****in bass for Corpse of a Rotting Hottie." Too bad I quit. :/
I'm FAT!
#5
Quote by tatatotfolife
You've got everything ass-backwards. Definitely play shows before you put a cd out. Go down to the local venue and be like "Hey, when's the next (insert genre here) show? We would like to play." Works for me, or get to know the local bands and just talk to them about getting shows. It's kinda stupid to release your art for free (Unless you're Radiohead and rich already), and nobodoy is going to want to pay for a cd by a band they've never heard before. Maybe record a short demo for advertising. One or two songs, but nothing big. After a while people are going to know who you are. My band played only like 3 shows before people started talking about us all the time. It's weird shit to have someone look at you and be like "That's the ****in bass for Corpse of a Rotting Hottie." Too bad I quit. :/


Gave away 70 CD's (Front cover, inside cover, back cover) and don't regret it at all
#6
We had CD's done before we played. When we played our first show, we had them for sale. It immediately gives you an appearance of legitimacy when you do that, so long as your performance backs that up.

Over the gigs we played, we probably made almost as much money on CD and merch sales than we did from the actual gigs themselves.

You've got to get gigs, sell stuff, and get press. Be visible anywhere you can be - on line, on TV, on the radio, in local magazines, etc. Eventually, you'll start to get name recognition, which goes a long way towards feeding that same hungry circle you started with, only on a wider scale.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
If you want to come across as professional, then burning them yourself is NOT the way to go. People don't want to buy something that looks like something they could do themselves. If they're going to spend money on a CD, they expect it to sound like - and look like - all the other CD's they buy.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.