#1
I have heard bits and pieces of conversation involving wood tones. Which type of wood sounds best on a solid body electric guitar? Are there different types off woods to be used in total, such as a ebony fretboard and mahogany body and head? Which type of wood will make it the easiest to move my hand around on the neck?
#2
there is no definitive answer to your ?s. no wood type is gonna be the best and you'll get opinions all over the place on that subject. just google wood types used in guitar making for a decent description of the various wood types and there affect on sound.
#4
There's usually not enough difference to be able to detect. The smoothest playing necks are the so called satin-finished ones.
#5
Quote by Tinderwet
There's usually not enough difference to be able to detect. The smoothest playing necks are the so called satin-finished ones.
Please, please stop posting this stuff. You've proven time and time again that you don't have much experience with different body and neck woods, we don't need more misinformation being spread around.

OP:
  • There is no ''best'' wood. It's entirely subjective; what tone you're after, what sort of weight you'd like the guitar to be, finish, etc.
  • Nearly every guitar uses different woods for the body, neck and fretboard. Rosewood and maple are pretty much the only two woods which are used to make a whole guitar out of, although there have been some guitars made entirely from ebony, mahogany, etc. These are very, very rare though and the vast majority of guitars are made out of two or three different types of wood.
  • For the back of the neck, most people find an unfinished wood is the ''fastest''. Not all woods are suitable to make an unfinished neck from though; many woods need to have a hard finish over them to protect them. Rosewood, ebony and wenge are all popular woods to make an unfinished neck out of; of these, wenge is usually the smoothest to play on. For the fretboard, the ''fastest'' option is usually any tight-grained wood such as ebony or any wood with a finish on it, such as maple. However, the comfort and playability of a neck really comes down to its dimensions more than the wood. You could have a neck made of pure ebony but if it is too large or too small for your hands then you won't be able to play very fast on it.
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#6
Quote by MrFlibble
Please, please stop posting this stuff. You've proven time and time again that you don't have much experience with different body and neck woods...


Either prove that, quote me where I wrote that, or stop trolling me. It's getting really boring.
#7
Quote by Tinderwet
There's usually not enough difference to be able to detect. The smoothest playing necks are the so called satin-finished ones.


Disagree. Different woods will handle the string vibration transfer differently. It is where tone and sustain happen so of course you will definitely hear the different ...if you're not layering the true tone with mountains of distortion and effects.

Satin neck is fast but you cannot for sure call it fastest. Different people will have different preference on this. Some swear by it, other might hate it with passion. Myself, I prefer to play on a well played polyester finish neck, once cleaned properly it's as smooth as butter. My friends find it's weird but it really does work for me.

My favorite combination will always be 1 or 2 piece Mahogany for the body and maple for the neck. Fretboard is dark and tight grained rosewood.
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Last edited by hminh87 at Jul 9, 2010,
#9
Quote by Tinderwet
Ok, you guys must be super humans with extremely sensitive ears. What kind of wood is this? (amp: Roland JC-120, mic: SM57, no added outboard effects)

Also, here's a second one, with some slight breakup. Name the wood. (amp: VOX AC30, mic: SM57, no added outboard effects)

You have to be able to name the - very commonly used - wood, else you failed the test.

Don't be such a sauerkraut.

You're saying you wouldn't hear the difference between a maple or a mahogany neck, on the same guitar with the same pickups?

Ok, you must be a complete ass-musician with extremely insensitive ears.
#10
all preference. hand moving is about the finish, not the wood type.

and it mostly matters for non-active electronics. you start pouring extreme gain and use EMGs into your music and the suble sounds of mahogany vs alder (for example) pretty much go away.
#11
Quote by Tinderwet
There's usually not enough difference to be able to detect.


I agree.

Quote by Tinderwet
Ok, you guys must be super humans with extremely sensitive ears. What kind of wood is this? (amp: Roland JC-120, mic: SM57, no added outboard effects)

Also, here's a second one, with some slight breakup. Name the wood. (amp: VOX AC30, mic: SM57, no added outboard effects)

You have to be able to name the - very commonly used - wood, else you failed the test.


I sure can't tell, nice playing tho.

Dunno why you're getting flamed for this btw. I guess some people have this urge to justify why their high dollar guitars are so elite, so they turn to some silly myths.
#12
Different types of wood have different tonal characters. The wood's density affects how the vibration of the strings resonates throughout the body, affecting not only sustain but also the overall sound of the guitar.

A good comparison is the Gibson Les Paul Vintage Mahogany/Studio Faded and a regular Gibson Les Paul Studio. The Vintage Mahogany is all-mahogany, whereas the Studio is constructed with a maple cap. The dense maple adds brightness to the tone. The Vintage Mahogany sounds slightly warmer.

Other factors include nut material, hardware quality, and construction quality; all of the factors affect body resonance.

As for moving your hand around quickly, it depends on your preference. Something I like to do to my gloss-finished guitars is to remove the gloss on the back of the neck down to a satin finish. This can be done with progressively finer steel wool or the use of an abrasive pad, followed by a polish.

EDIT: If it didn't matter, all guitars would be made from basswood. I remember not hearing the difference when I was a beginner, but once I started playing different styles of guitars through good amps such as my JCM2000 or a Vox AC30, I could clearly hear the difference between different kinds of guitars. The easiest example is the hard and dense wood and structure of the Stratocaster with its bolt-on maple neck and alder body, versus the soft and warm wood and structure of the Les Paul with its mahogany body and set mahogany neck. The difference is easily distinguishable even to a beginner. The twangy pop and warm drive are very distinct.

After a few years, you will be able to hear the difference even in wood quality. My JB/'59-equipped Epiphone sounds a lot muddier than my buddy's JB/'59 Gibson, and my Epiphone has the highest-quality parts and electronics installed, including caps, pots, bridge, tailpiece, switch, and jack. The only real difference between our guitars is the wood, and his guitar sounds clearly less-muddy and more defined.
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Last edited by philipp122 at Jul 9, 2010,
#13
Quote by Tinderwet
Ok, you guys must be super humans with extremely sensitive ears. What kind of wood is this? (amp: Roland JC-120, mic: SM57, no added outboard effects)

Also, here's a second one, with some slight breakup. Name the wood. (amp: VOX AC30, mic: SM57, no added outboard effects)

You have to be able to name the - very commonly used - wood, else you failed the test.


OH NOOOOOOES I CAN'T TELL THE WOOD TYPE WITH YOUR RECORDING EVEN THOUGH A SM57 THROUGH WHATEVER INTERFACE YOU HAVE IS SO TRANSPARENT AND I KNOW EXACTLY HOW AN AC30 EFFECTS THE WOOD TYPE AND ITS SPECIFIC INTERACTION WITH YOUR RECORDING SIGNAL CHAIN. I FAAAAAAAAAAIL.

look are you like diagnostically dumb or something? music is for listening.
guitars are for playing. if you can't tell the difference with two guitars in your hand you shouldn't be playing music. because your deaf and it's really hard to play music when your deaf. not saying it can't be done but like there are way easier things to do.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer