#1
Other than musictheory.net are there any other internet resources (preferably for free/quite cheap) or techniques, excercises or ways to practice training my ear? I posted here and not in MT as I thought if there are any bass specific tools/resources I might find them here


Thanks in advance
#3
Auralia is what my school uses for the interval practice.
"Whats that noise??"

"... Jazz"
#4
I would say it's best to learn by doing. Try transcribing simple(r) melodies by ear and play random intervals and try to guess.
#5
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
A good one to use is good-ear.com. It's got basic intervals, chromatic intervals, chords, scales etc. All of the basic ear training needs.


I'll second this one and also recommend that you incorporate scale and arppegio work in your daily practice routine.
#6
Quote by anarkee
I'll second this one and also recommend that you incorporate scale and arppegio work in your daily practice routine.

I do, do scale/arpeggio work.

I'm currently working towards an RGT grade 6 exam (taking the winter exams) and I can recognise certain things, such as if I am playing a C7 arpeggio and miss/play a wrong note, I can tell that I've made a mistake.

But what I can't seem to do is name intervals. So if you played a C then a B without me knowing/watching, I wouldn't be able to determine that as a Major 7th interval.

Theres another part which is repeating a short phrase, so the examiner will play a phrase without me looking and I'll have to play it as closely as I can.

That site seems good and it's been working, and I've got a basic grip on some of the interval work, but I seem to have trouble when I deselect the static root option (i.e. so there isn't a constant root note).

Will this just improve with practice?
#7
^yes. Another trick is to practice singing scales or songs using Solfège. Your voice is easily your most accurate instrument and its amazing how nailing intervals with your singing voice can help train your ear.
#8
just listen to some simple songs, like those 8note patterns. just guess untill you find the first note, then listen to the relationship with the next, higher or lower, then find the next.
Spoon + Pen = Spen
Quote by HJS >.>
What would be the best bass string size to play something like Slipknot

Quote by Brad_Bassist
No strings. If you're playing Slipknot, you don't deserve strings.
#9
Quote by anarkee
^yes. Another trick is to practice singing scales or songs using Solfège. Your voice is easily your most accurate instrument and its amazing how nailing intervals with your singing voice can help train your ear.


I'm going to argue that voice is your least accurate instrument UNLESS you can already hear the intervals. Singing is great and is probably the best way of ingraining things in your mind, like intervals.

and once you get you're head and voice around singing intervals try playing a note, thinking of the interval and just sing the higher note.

so yes, once you can sing the intervals/scales you'll ace that test no problem.
"Whats that noise??"

"... Jazz"
#10
musictheory.net is great for intervals
it's under exercises

Also, learn to sing or at least hear intervals in Solfa it's the best tool you have for ear and aural tests etc