#1
Okay, so I play metal thru a fender champion 600 5watt tube amp (I know, horrible for metal) and a Boss multi effects pedal. So I noticed when I switched this amp it is really hard getting pinch harmonics on it. So I plugged up mu multi effects thru my home stereo int a crappy little speaker I stole from an old radio. It was like a freakin Zakk Wylde cd. Are speakers really the thing that determines the ability to produce harmonics or is it other factors?
#3
I'm guessing you had the stereo turned up louder than the Champ will go? PH are generally about feedback more than anything, which you can't get at lower levels... That is a bit perplexing though, same setting used on the MFX?
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#4
Pinch harmonics don't ring out properly if you use loads of muffled distortion or fuzz to be honest. If you're using normal distortion though then it's not really the amps fault as much as it is yours. I can do pinch harmonics really easy if i set up my amp in a really distorted trebley way but the tone would be pretty bad.

So , some tones make pinch harmonics much easier, although unless you're using a really muffled distortion then you should still be able to do them , just with less ease.
#5
People always say "IT'Z JUZ TEH TEKNIQUE"

No. It's half technique. Gain and pickups have a lot to do with it. Yes I know you can do pinch harmonics on your acoustic. I don't care.

I was playing my epi Les Paul (stock pickups) through some Fender solid state. I learned the technique and everything, but my pinch harmonics just never sounded right. I played my friends Schecter with EMGs through his Krank stack, and I'm sounding like Zakk Wylde. I couldn't believe how effortlessly I was doing pinch harmonics.

There's probably something about the mix of your effects and your 5 watt fender that are hindering the sound of your pinch harmoncs, I really doubt it the speakers.
#6
Quote by tubetime86
I'm guessing you had the stereo turned up louder than the Champ will go? PH are generally about feedback more than anything, which you can't get at lower levels... That is a bit perplexing though, same setting used on the MFX?



Pinch harmonics have nothing to do with feedback, they will feed back awesomely though. I would guess that the frequency of certain harmonic overtones were filtered out by the amps circuitry making it sound odd and thin. The home stereo will amplify a wider range of frequencies allowing more overtones to come through. Just a guess though.
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#7
yeah man that amp isnt helping, but you also need some decent gain, and the right guitar. also, USE THE BRIDGE PICKUP!!! also, there are certaint spots in the string where they come through.

to know this on your guitar, try to do pinch harmonics and move up and down the string. there will be a spot where they come through more than other places.

also, the pick makes a HUGE difference. i really cant even do them with regualr picks. i need some for of jazz or stubby pick, a quarter works, or those small teardrop style work great.
#9
ermm to all those saying "Teh teknikezzZZ"
its not necessary... on my strat and crappy amp its really hard to pull off a PH.. however when i play with my band... plugged my RP355 (with cab sim) to the mixer and PA the PHs sound so freaking TEH BR))TALLZZZ honestly.. i'ts i guess the volume and may be speakers??

i mostly tend to the side of the VOLUME
#10
Thanks for the input. I use a '91 Ibanez RG550 but I have a crappy Duncan Designed Invader copy in bridge. So yeah im guessing its the stereo (since its freaking 200 watts!) But I think it may be partially my technique. I sort of turn the pick a little like a key to strike one up. Someone said that isn't proper.... But w/e.