#1
So, I was going to write a song in D Phrygian
D D# F# G A A# C D.
I sharped the C instead so it's
D D# F# G A A# C# D
What scale does that make it?
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"
#2
You would write D Phrygian out like this:
D Eb F G A Bb C D

When writing out a scale, you want to use every note, and not repeat any (D D#), also, the F is naturalized, probably just a typo.

You'd write out this scale like this:
D Eb F G A Bb C# D

or like this is you wanted to keep the F sharped:
D Eb F# G A Bb C# D

and I've honestly never heard of these scales, but if they sound alright, go ahead and use them!

Sorry I couldn't really help, and just spent the whole reply trying to correct you...
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#3
When you're talking about a key in this context, it's best to use all notes in the musical alphabet, instead of naming the same note twice (like D and D#...why not D and Eb). Also, the first set of notes you wrote is not a D Phrygian.

D Phrygian, would be:
D, Eb, F, G, A, Bb, C, D
1, b2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7, 8

If you raise the b7, you'll get:

D, Eb, F, G, A, Bb, C#, D
1, b2, b3, 4, 5, b6, 7, 8

I'm not quite sure what this would be. Anyone else?
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#4
You've got your scale all effed up

D Phrygian is: D Eb F G A Bb C D

I'm not sure on your new scale but it maybe just an alteration of Phrygian scale, similar to how the Harmonic minor is altered. I'd imagine it sounds a tad bit similar to the Major scale with the whole step between six and seen and the half between 7 and 8.
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#5
Quote by tatatotfolife
You've got your scale all effed up

D Phrygian is: D Eb F G A Bb C D

I'm not sure on your new scale but it maybe just an alteration of Phrygian scale, similar to how the Harmonic minor is altered. I'd imagine it sounds a tad bit similar to the Major scale with the whole step between six and seen and the half between 7 and 8.


If you play it with the F# it has some kind of middle eastern sound, Sounds kind of cool actually
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"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#6
Quote by sites.nick
If you play it with the F# it has some kind of middle eastern sound, Sounds kind of cool actually



Well, I think I may have to try it out.

TS, I think you've inspired me to write the Iraqi national anthem.
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#7
Yeah.
I'm playing it with the F#.
I see where I messed up with it lol, but yes, I like the messed up version more.
Definately middle eastern, I've got a cool chord progression so far for an intro and trying to work out a verse.

lol, I'm glad to have inspired.
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"
#8
It's the double harmonic scale (also known as the Arabic scale).

Phrygian in D is D Eb F G A Bb C. By raising the third degree you get the Phrygian dominant scale which is D Eb F# G A Bb C. To get the double harmonic scale you raise the 7th degree of the Phrygian dominant, in other words the C. It adds up. Although the real double harmonic scale is played with quarter tones, the equal tempered adaptation sounds quite nice.

EDIT: The quarter tones are located in between the first and last half steps. So the scale in authentic Middle Eastern music would be:

D Eb-half F# G A Bb C#-half

Don't bother with that though. Middle Eastern music is confusing as hell, especially to people used to Western music theory. The quarter tones are not actually EXACTLY 1/4th steps, they have very minute microtonal variations. It depends in what maqam you are playing what the note's actual frequency is. It's impossible on equal tempered instruments; you need a fretless one like a violin or more preferably a real Eastern instrument like the oud or qanun.

Also, remember that harmony in most maqamat is basically non-existent. Don't try to play chords with quarter tones in them; it will sound very bad.
Last edited by Sóknardalr at Jul 9, 2010,
#9
Sóknardalr that's awesome.
nice bit of theory there.
I like the scale.
Should be a bit unusual to put lead fills in with.
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"
#10
Quote by Nameless742
Sóknardalr that's awesome.
nice bit of theory there.
I like the scale.
Should be a bit unusual to put lead fills in with.


Go for it; that may sound really cool actually. You may also recognize the scale from Dick Dale's surf-rock adaptation of the folk tune Misirlou (although it is the Western equal-tempered version).
#11
I won't lie, I've used the exact scale pattern before but using E as my base. with the F# its a Phrygian Dominant scale, with the raised 7th, i'm not sure, but I do it a lot myself. If its the double harmonic scale, then thats what it is xD
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#12
Quote by Zinnie
I won't lie, I've used the exact scale pattern before but using E as my base. with the F# its a Phrygian Dominant scale, with the raised 7th, i'm not sure, but I do it a lot myself. If its the double harmonic scale, then thats what it is xD


Phrygian dominant is also quite commonly used in Middle Eastern music I think. Most notably Arabic and Egyptian. I'm almost certain that this emulation of ancient Egyptian music is almost wholly in Phrygian dominant:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U776dQVnEQI (this album is so awesome)

I've been extremely interested in Eastern music of all kinds for about half a year now or so. I've read all I can find on the theory and the traditions of it, but it's still very confusing. I would love to travel to the Middle East some day and learn from someone classically trained.
#13
The phrygian mode uses the intervals 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7. Your scale/mode uses the intervals 1 b2 3 4 5 b6 7 (altering phrygian by raising the 3rd degree and the 7th degree). As people have pointed out it's technical name is the double harmonic scale. It's an interesting little scale because of the two consecutive half-steps (7-1 and 1-b2) and the two augmented seconds (b2-3 and b3-7). It's also symmetrical, which creates some interesting dissonance. You may recognize it from Dick Dale's "Miserlou," a cover of a Greek song, "Misirlou" (which I see Sóknardalr pointed out as well) which was on one of the guitar hero games and it was also sampled by the Black Eyed Peas on "Pump It."

Just thought I'd share that with you!
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#14
Quote by food1010
The phrygian mode uses the intervals 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7. Your scale/mode uses the intervals 1 b2 3 4 5 b6 7 (altering phrygian by raising the 3rd degree and the 7th degree). As people have pointed out it's technical name is the double harmonic scale. It's an interesting little scale because of the two consecutive half-steps (7-1 and 1-b2) and the two augmented seconds (b2-3 and b3-7). It's also symmetrical, which creates some interesting dissonance. You may recognize it from Dick Dale's "Miserlou," a cover of a Greek song, "Misirlou" (which I see Sóknardalr pointed out as well) which was on one of the guitar hero games and it was also sampled by the Black Eyed Peas on "Pump It."

Just thought I'd share that with you!


Yeah I know it.
I heard it first on the movie "Pulp Fiction"
Interesting bit of Trivia and knowledge definately.
Thanks everyone for posting.
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"