#1
I'm not sure if this is the correct forum for this, if not my bad.

I just realized something today: I know how to make augmented/diminished/seventh/minor seventh/major seventh/major/minor chords/ninth etc (barre mostly) on the low E string, A string, and D string, so I have a decent amount of chords to select from here, BUT I don't know that many open chords.

I only know the very basic open chords, like the majors and Am etc...

Does anybody have a link that gives a tab or something for all the possible open chords? I could spend the time to figure them out for myself like I did with all the other chords but I'm trying to work on different things right now and spending that much time on figuring out fingerings just doesn't seem worth it if there are tabs out there...

Thanks.
#2
Quote by -TM-
I'm not sure if this is the correct forum for this, if not my bad.

I just realized something today: I know how to make augmented/diminished/seventh/minor seventh/major seventh/major/minor chords/ninth etc (barre mostly) on the low E string, A string, and D string, so I have a decent amount of chords to select from here, BUT I don't know that many open chords.

I only know the very basic open chords, like the majors and Am etc...

Does anybody have a link that gives a tab or something for all the possible open chords? I could spend the time to figure them out for myself like I did with all the other chords but I'm trying to work on different things right now and spending that much time on figuring out fingerings just doesn't seem worth it if there are tabs out there...

Thanks.


not ALL of them. But ALOT of the usable/practical open chords....

Chord Diagrams

Chord Videos


Explore...have fun
shred is gaudy music
#3
Quote by GuitarMunky
not ALL of them. But ALOT of the usable/practical open chords....

Chord Diagrams

Chord Videos


Explore...have fun

Holy God that's a lot lol.

Looks like I'll have some fun the coming weeks. Damn thanks man that first site is awesome so far.


EDIT: What does it mean when it has the /E?

Example being: AMaj7/E or A/E?
Last edited by -TM- at Jul 9, 2010,
#4
Quote by -TM-
EDIT: What does it mean when it has the /E?

Example being: AMaj7/E or A/E?


that the E is in the bass of the chord.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#5
Quote by -TM-
Holy God that's a lot lol.

Looks like I'll have some fun the coming weeks. Damn thanks man that first site is awesome so far.


EDIT: What does it mean when it has the /E?

Example being: AMaj7/E or A/E?


yeah, there are a lot of them. don't let it overwhelm you though. just explore, and have fun with them. What I like to do is get creative and try to come up with a riff.

the "open chord" riff section may give you some ideas.

Chord Riffs

(choose DGO riffs in drop down "sections" menu.... those are all free)


AMaj7/E = an AMaj7 chord with E as the bass note.
(as opposed to an AMaj7 chord, Which would just have an A(the root) as the bass note)

so left side of slash = the chord
right side of slash = alt bass note

C/E = C chord with an E in the bass

make sense?
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 9, 2010,
#6
Quote by AeolianWolf
that the E is in the bass of the chord.

Would that be an inversion then?

Should I literally play the chord from bottom up?

On the one I'm staring at right now it says G/B in the G chord section and the B appears to be the root note.
#7
Quote by GuitarMunky
yeah, there are a lot of them. don't let it overwhelm you though. just explore, and have fun with them. get creative and try to come up with a riff with some new chord.

the "open chord" riffs may give you some ideas.

Chord Riffs

(choose DGO riffs in drop down menu.... those are all free)


AMaj7/E = an AMaj7 chord with E as the bass note.
(as opposed to an AMaj7 chord, Which would just have an A(the root) as the bass note)

so left side of slash = the chord
right side of slash = alt bass note

C/E = C chord with an E in the bass

make sense?

Yes it does, just slightly weird to me as I've always been told that the root needs to be the lowest in order for it to be considered X chord.

Do you play it the same way as you normally would?
#8
Quote by -TM-
Would that be an inversion then?


right


Quote by -TM-

Should I literally play the chord from bottom up?

play as written

Quote by -TM-

On the one I'm staring at right now it says G/B in the G chord section and the B appears to be the root note.


B is the bass note (lowest played note).... but G is always the root of a G chord.


Quote by -TM-
I've always been told that the root needs to be the lowest in order for it to be considered X chord.



Oh, I see. well that simply isn't true. Having the third or fifth in the bass, is fairly common. And of course you can have other alternate bass notes as well.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 9, 2010,
#10
Quote by -TM-
Would that be an inversion then?
Well, "slash notation" is a bit weird sometimes because it's not always an inversion; only if the note is a chord tone.

So C/E is a first inversion of C major since the 3 is in the bass. C/B or C/Bb or C/D or whatever aren't inversions because the bass notes do not occur naturally in the chord, they are either used as passing tones or simple added tones.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#11
Quote by food1010
Well, "slash notation" is a bit weird sometimes because it's not always an inversion; only if the note is a chord tone.

So C/E is a first inversion of C major since the 3 is in the bass. C/B or C/Bb or C/D or whatever aren't inversions because the bass notes do not occur naturally in the chord, they are either used as passing tones or simple added tones.


C/D I can understand not being an inversion... but C/B or C/Bb could very well be a third inversion CM7/C7 chords, respectively.
#12
Quote by DiminishedFifth

C/D I can understand not being an inversion... but C/B or C/Bb could very well be a third inversion CM7/C7 chords, respectively.
Ah, I thought someone would say that.

Note your words: "could very well be." You didn't say "are" because there are times when a C/B is not the same thing as a Cmaj7/B.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#13
Quote by food1010
Ah, I thought someone would say that.

Note your words: "could very well be." You didn't say "are" because there are times when a C/B is not the same thing as a Cmaj7/B.

Yes, but the way you worded it made it sound like it was an absolute. Like if there's a B in the bass of a C chord it'll never be a CM7/B chord.

Quote by food1010
C/B or C/Bb... aren't inversions because the bass notes do not occur naturally in the chord


You're wording is that "This is how it is and forever will be" kind of way. Just trying to clear things up for TS ;]

I would imagine if I ever saw a C/B that it would just be for a second as a passing tone. An extended stay on that would be ridiculous to not call that CM7/B.
#14
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Yes, but the way you worded it made it sound like it was an absolute. Like if there's a B in the bass of a C chord it'll never be a CM7/B chord.

You're wording is that "This is how it is and forever will be" kind of way. Just trying to clear things up for TS ;]

I would imagine if I ever saw a C/B that it would just be for a second as a passing tone. An extended stay on that would be ridiculous to not call that CM7/B.
Yes of course. I didn't mean to use the "absolute" wording. I tend to do that a lot...

But that demonstrates how much I dislike slash notation. Cmaj7 third inversion is so much more specific. Plus Cmaj7(4/2) isn't even really all that much more difficult to notate, but it is all that much more descriptive.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#15
Quote by food1010
Yes of course. I didn't mean to use the "absolute" wording. I tend to do that a lot...

But that demonstrates how much I dislike slash notation. Cmaj7 third inversion is so much more specific. Plus Cmaj7(4/2) isn't even really all that difficult to notate.

Wording is everything, my frood! (lolcwutididthar?)

I prefer to just say "x inversion"... slash notation is only good on lead sheets for quick reading.

Not gonna lie... the first time I saw an online 6 chord (like C6) I thought it was a C chord in first inversion
#16
Here is a pretty way to play Emaj9. It's not completely open. More of a broken set, but you only mute one string and it has a wide open sound. Just to add to your mix.

Emaj9
--0----
--7----
--8----
--6----
--x----
--0----

or for completely open

--0----
--7----
--8----
--6----
--7----
--0----
"He who loves practice without theory is like the sailor who boards ship without a rudder and compass and never knows where he may cast."

~Leonardo da Vinci
Last edited by c_foster88 at Jul 10, 2010,
#17
Quote by food1010
Well, "slash notation" is a bit weird sometimes because it's not always an inversion; only if the note is a chord tone.

So C/E is a first inversion of C major since the 3 is in the bass. C/B or C/Bb or C/D or whatever aren't inversions because the bass notes do not occur naturally in the chord, they are either used as passing tones or simple added tones.


Well the TS was asking if Amaj7/E was in inversion....... it IS.


Quote by food1010

But that demonstrates how much I dislike slash notation. Cmaj7 third inversion is so much more specific. Plus Cmaj7(4/2) isn't even really all that much more difficult to notate, but it is all that much more descriptive.

Whats not to like? and what's the point in coming up with your own nomenclature if nobody else uses it?
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 10, 2010,
#18
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well the TS was asking if Amaj7/E was in inversion....... it IS.
True.

Quote by GuitarMunky
Whats not to like?
I already explained my opinion on that.

Quote by GuitarMunky
and what's the point in coming up with your own nomenclature if nobody else uses it?
That's not my own nomenclature. I didn't come up with it. I'm aware that it's pretty standard procedure for notating inversions. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figured_bass

My point was that slash notation does not necessarily indicate an inversion. All it does is indicate a bass note that isn't the root. It does nothing to say whether or not the note is a chord tone.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#19
Quote by food1010


That's not my own nomenclature. I didn't come up with it. I'm aware that it's pretty standard procedure for notating inversions. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figured_bass

figured bass serves a different function than chord symbols. (see bottom)


Quote by food1010

My point was that slash notation does not necessarily indicate an inversion. All it does is indicate a bass note that isn't the root. It does nothing to say whether or not the note is a chord tone.


It's not intended to....thats not it's purpose.


The thing you have to consider is that chord symbols are intended for the reader which necessitates them being simple. A person reading a chord chart only needs enough information to be able to play the piece. They aren't analyzing the piece as they sight read it.

figured bass on the other hand, is for analysis, which is why it gives more specific details.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 10, 2010,
#20
Quote by GuitarMunky
figured bass serves a different function than chord symbols. (see bottom)
I fail to see your point.

Quote by GuitarMunky
It's not intended to....thats not it's purpose.

The thing you have to consider is that chord symbols are intended for the reader which necessitates them being simple. A person reading a chord chart only needs enough information to be able to play the piece. They aren't analyzing the piece as they sight read it.
Of course. However, what if you were to improvise a solo over a chord sheet or a lead sheet? There might be a big difference to you between C/B and Cmaj7 third inversion.

Quote by GuitarMunky
figured bass on the other hand, is for analysis, which is why it gives more specific details.
Sure. I myself prefer to understand how the chords in a song are meant to function (likely because I like to improv a lot). As a bassist, a bass line I play over a C/B is going to be rather different than over a Cmaj7 third inversion (very similarly to my example above).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jul 10, 2010,
#21
http://upload.wikimedia.org/math/7/e/1/7e10cfbf9f480583381cd1494c52cc8a.png I fail to see your point.
The point is your comparing apples and oranges. You're not considering the actual purpose of chord symbols VS figured bass

Quote by food1010

Of course. However, what if you were to improvise a solo over a chord sheet or a lead sheet? There might be a big difference to you between C/B and Cmaj7 third inversion.

you mean CMaj7/B and CMaj7 3rd inversion right?
and what would be the big difference?

even if you meant C/B..... explain how it could be different than a CMaj7 chord in 3rd inversion.


Quote by food1010

Sure. I myself prefer to understand how the chords in a song are meant to function (likely because I like to improv a lot). As a bassist, a bass line I play over a C/B is going to be rather different than over a Cmaj7 third inversion (very similarly to my example above).


Well, thats fine but chord symbols don't serve that purpose. They are for the reader.... not the analyst.

and again, how would your bassline over a C/B chord be any different to playing it over a CMaj7 3rd inversion?
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 10, 2010,
#22
Quote by GuitarMunky
The point is your comparing apples and oranges. You're not considering the actual purpose of chord symbols VS figured bass
I realize they serve different purposes.

Quote by GuitarMunky
you mean CMaj7/B and CMaj7 3rd inversion right?
No, I don't.

Quote by GuitarMunky
and what would be the big difference?
Well, yeah Cmaj7/B and Cmaj7 3rd inversion are the same thing, but...

Quote by GuitarMunky
even if you meant C/B..... explain how it could be different than a CMaj7 chord in 3rd inversion.
Function. C/B functions as a C major triad, with a B in the bass. Cmaj7 in third inversion functions as a C major 7th chord, only inverted. I hope you can tell the difference.

Quote by GuitarMunky
Well, thats fine but chord symbols don't serve that purpose. They are for the reader.... not the analyst.
Do they have to be completely separate entities?

Quote by GuitarMunky
and again, how would your bassline over a C/B chord be any different to playing it over a CMaj7 3rd inversion?
It's all about chord tones. In C/B, B is not a chord tone, it's just the note that is played in the bass. In Cmaj7/B (or Cmaj7 third inversion as I prefer to call it), B is a chord tone, just as C E and G are.

It's kind of hard to give an example to show how I think when playing over different progressions, especially because context makes a big difference, but the whole chord tone thing is a big part of it. Over both a C/B and a Cmaj7/B I would try to focus most on the B (since it's the bass note), but over the Cmaj7 the other chord tones would be just as important to me.

On the contrary, if I were to improvise a lead, over C/B I wouldn't treat the B as a chord tone whereas over a Cmaj7 I would.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#23
Quote by food1010
. C/B functions as a C major triad, with a B in the bass. Cmaj7 in third inversion functions as a C major 7th chord, only inverted. I hope you can tell the difference.


I cant because there is no difference.


Quote by food1010

Do they have to be completely separate entities?


Well, they are. I didn't come up with it. I don't question it, because I think it's more useful to recognize it for what it is and......... utilize it.


Quote by food1010

It's all about chord tones. In C/B, B is not a chord tone, it's just the note that is played in the bass. In Cmaj7/B (or Cmaj7 third inversion as I prefer to call it), B is a chord tone, just as C E and G are.




a sustained B note over a C Major chord will always function as the 7th (a chord tone). I mean that's how you define a major seventh chord....... a major triad + the Major 7th or (R 3 5 7)..... (C E G B)




Quote by food1010

It's kind of hard to give an example to show how I think when playing over different progressions, especially because context makes a big difference, but the whole chord tone thing is a big part of it. Over both a C/B and a Cmaj7/B I would try to focus most on the B (since it's the bass note), but over the Cmaj7 the other chord tones would be just as important to me.


well a CMaj7/B and C/B tell you the bass player the exact same thing....... play/emphasize B...... and that the harmony is C Major 7th.


Quote by food1010

On the contrary, if I were to improvise a lead, over C/B I wouldn't treat the B as a chord tone whereas over a Cmaj7 I would.


then you wouldn't be listening because it does function as a chord tone.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 10, 2010,
#24
Technicality Battle!!!!!!
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#25
I'm getting rather fed up with arguing about this. It doesn't really seem we are going to come to any consensus, but I guess I'll keep trying to express my point of view.

Quote by GuitarMunky
I cant because there is no difference.
You're saying a C major triad and a C major 7th chord don't function differently?

Quote by GuitarMunky
Well, they are. I didn't come up with it. I don't question it, because I think it's more useful to recognize it for what it is and......... utilize it.
So I can't be both a reader AND an analyst? I have to pick one or the other?

Now let's make this clear: I'm not trying to argue with conventions, but are you trying to tell me if I wrote out a chord sheet with figured bass instead of slash notation I would be wrong?

Moreover, slash notation is merely a contemporary form of chord notation. To say that the classical notation (figured bass) is wrong is absurd, at least in my opinion.

Quote by GuitarMunky
a sustained B note over a C Major chord will always function as the 7th (a chord tone). I mean that's how you define a major seventh chord....... a major triad + the Major 7th or (R 3 5 7)..... (C E G B)

well a CMaj7/B and C/B tell you the bass player the exact same thing....... play/emphasize B...... and that the harmony is C Major 7th.

then you wouldn't be listening because it does function as a chord tone.
You're not understanding what I'm trying to say. What if the B ISN'T part of the chord? The "bass note" is not always a chord tone, sometimes it's a passing tone. The bass note is generally notated whether or not it's a chord tone. Say you have a guitarist and a bassist reading off of a chord sheet. If they come across a C/B and the guitarist decides to leave the bass note to the bassist, is the guitarist going to play a Cmaj7? No, he's just going to play a C major triad. On the other hand, if he saw Cmaj7/B, he would likely play a Cmaj7 rather than saying "oh, well the 7 is in the bass, so I won't play that."

It's the same deal if you're reading a whole lead sheet. When you see the melody, you don't count those notes as chord tones, unless they actually are. If you have a melody over a C major chord that goes C D E you don't call the chord a Cadd9 when the D is sounded, unless of course it's sounded in a way that suggests it's a chord tone.

I don't know, like I said I'm getting sick of arguing over this. That's my understanding of it. If you disagree, then fine. I just hope you understand my logic.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#26
Quote by food1010


You're saying a C major triad and a C major 7th chord don't function differently?

what I am saying is that a C Major triad with a B in the bass IS a C Major 7th chord.

but now that you mention it, there is no difference in function between a C Major triad and a C Major 7th chord. there is a difference in color though.

Quote by food1010

So I can't be both a reader AND an analyst? I have to pick one or the other?

Ummm no. you just have to accept that chord symbols aren't for analysis. so if you see a chord chart you just have to deal with that. if you want to analyze a piece of music..... find a score with figured bass, or just use your own knowledge.


Quote by food1010

Now let's make this clear: I'm not trying to argue with conventions, but are you trying to tell me if I wrote out a chord sheet with figured bass instead of slash notation I would be wrong?


that's not at all what I'm trying to tell you.

Quote by food1010

Moreover, slash notation is merely a contemporary form of chord notation. To say that the classical notation (figured bass) is wrong is absurd, at least in my opinion.


to take anything I've said as meaning "classical notation (figured bass) is wrong" is absurd.
nothing could be further from the truth.

I will say though that by downgrading the relevance of contemporary notation you're doing yourself a disservice. The fact that were arguing over something as silly as this is proof. I mean I could argue that figured bass is " merely" a notation from the past. but I wouldn't because I wouldn't, and I'm not.


Quote by food1010

You're not understanding what I'm trying to say. What if the B ISN'T part of the chord? The "bass note" is not always a chord tone, sometimes it's a passing tone.


if it's a passing tone it won't be labeled in the chord symbol. so anytime you see a chord symbol with a slash.....that alternate bass note is PART of the chord. otherwise it would not be notated.

now figured bass is different. it's much more descriptive and specific as to the actual parts. (which is why I said it's like comparing apples and oranges)

Quote by food1010


Say you have a guitarist and a bassist reading off of a chord sheet. If they come across a C/B and the guitarist decides to leave the bass note to the bassist, is the guitarist going to play a Cmaj7?


Yep. because they will be playing a C triad (CEG) AND the 7th(B) which = CEGB which = CMaj7

if they choose to just play the C triad and ignore the alternate bass note ( because it's covered by the bass player), than the overall harmony is still CMaj7

Quote by food1010

On the other hand, if he saw Cmaj7/B, he would likely play a Cmaj7 rather than saying "oh, well the 7 is in the bass, so I won't play that."


well I can't say what a particular individual do, but playing a C Major triad or a Major 7th chord would work / function in the same way.


Quote by food1010

It's the same deal if you're reading a whole lead sheet. When you see the melody, you don't count those notes as chord tones, unless they actually are. If you have a melody over a C major chord that goes C D E you don't call the chord a Cadd9 when the D is sounded, unless of course it's sounded in a way that suggests it's a chord tone.


that's not the same deal. it doesn't work the same way.

Quote by food1010

I don't know, like I said I'm getting sick of arguing over this. That's my understanding of it. If you disagree, then fine. I just hope you understand my logic.


I understand where you're coming from.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 10, 2010,
#27
Quote by DiminishedFifth

Not gonna lie... the first time I saw an online 6 chord (like C6) I thought it was a C chord in first inversion


Man, I did that too then looked like a retard in front of m jazz band class while m teacher explained it to me
My sig used to be so awesome it got me banned