#1
EDIT: Figured it out. Answer in post #7 for anyone who's interested

So since I'm low on cash, I'm stuck using a crappy Fender Bullet Solid State amp. The cleans sound good but the distortion - not so much.

Since I won't be getting a new amp any time soon I was wondering if buying (or making) a distortion or overdrive pedal and using the clean channel on the amp would sound good? Better yet, I could use a keyboard amp at church where I play and just put a distortion or overdrive before it. Since the keyboard amp focuses on reproducing the truest sound, and the distortion or OD pedal would be doing the distortion, could I do this?, and would it sound pretty good? Or is there something I'm missing?

Thank ya!
Last edited by cjmabry at Jul 11, 2010,
#2
As for not blowing up, it'll be fine, however, if the keyboard amp is like a PA, it would sound like playing it through a speaker or something, much too harsh and everything. Try it, if it sounds good, use it.
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#3
Quote by TheBigProjekt
As for not blowing up, it'll be fine, however, if the keyboard amp is like a PA, it would sound like playing it through a speaker or something, much too harsh and everything. Try it, if it sounds good, use it.


Well that's the thing. I'd rather not make a pedal before I get a tube amp if it wouldn't sound very good.

The cleans sound great on both though if that helps any. Would using the little fender be better because it's an actual amp?

I'm not sure why it wouldn't sound good though. If you use a pedal to get distortion at lower volumes on a tube amp then the pedal is doing all of the "dirty" work in distorting it and then the amp is just replicating that sound through the clean channel.
Last edited by cjmabry at Jul 10, 2010,
#4
Have you ever heard a pedal through a normal speaker or PA? Like if you don't have a cabinet simulator on, it sounds like garbage. I'm not sure if it'll be like that on a keyboard amp, but I'm pretty sure they would have the same effect as a speaker or PA system.
Quote by BobDetroit
Directions:
Unplug keyboard.
Place it in your butt so you can't post anymore.


Quote by Fadetoblack5:03
You deserve some form of awesome reward, but I'm to lazy. Imagine the rest of these:


#5
I've played an RP50 through a keyboard amp before for Jazz... it sound's pretty dece, actually. You just need to EQ everything and set it up right.
#6
Quote by TheBigProjekt
Have you ever heard a pedal through a normal speaker or PA? Like if you don't have a cabinet simulator on, it sounds like garbage. I'm not sure if it'll be like that on a keyboard amp, but I'm pretty sure they would have the same effect as a speaker or PA system.


Hmmmm...
Maybe I should just not worry about pedals until I have a good amp lol.

But would running through the Fender amp be any different? If so, what would make it different from the Keyboard amp?

EDIT:
Quote by r0ckth3d34n
I've played an RP50 through a keyboard amp before for Jazz... it sound's pretty dece, actually. You just need to EQ everything and set it up right.


Really? I might have to try it then.
Last edited by cjmabry at Jul 10, 2010,
#7
Well, I found the answer to my question through some research :P


A combo amp with a speaker or two and an open back implements a multi-pole lowpass filter all by itself. This is at least one of the reasons that a miked amp is preferable to running a distortion signal directly into a PA mixer. The speaker cabinet's lowpass action smooths off those offending treble shrieks. An electronic multipole lowpass filter is the essence of all those "cabinet simulators" you see.


Basically, lower pitches pass through solid materials better than higher pitches. This is why you hear the bass frequencies a couple of rooms over from music. The cabinet itself cuts out these harsh treble frequencies that the distortion pedal makes, hence making it sound better.

A cabinet simulater has this lowpass filter (a filter that allows the low frequencies through and cuts out the harsh trebles).

I feel smart now! haha

So maybe I should build my own cab simulater? Only time will tell :P

In theory though it should work better with the guitar amp because of the construction.