#1
As the title suggests, just got a new (well old) Ibanez RG560 and I've never worked with a Floyd Rose before. The strings on it had blatantly not been changed in a long time and there were several packs of light strings with it, so I restrung it with a pack of them.

Here is a picture of the bridge now.



I'm assuming, from my I've seen, the angle is far off from right. I know changing string gauges and all changes it, but I'd assume it were the same gauge/company as before, seeing as it came with it all. Just wondering what else I may have done wrong... Before though, it was still somewhat high I think, but not quite this much. Maybe I just tuned higher?

But yeah, just making sure I'm not going to completely mess it up it I leave it stringed as is for now until I can have someone more knowledgeable help me set it up better.

Thanks for any help.
Arms Of Empire
^ ^ ^ Band I am involved in ^ ^ ^
Please check it out? ;D


Axe FX II + EBMM JP6 + Jackson DK2S
#2
nothing wrong with it, too much pressure coming from the strings, it's probably not in tune yet and some strings add alot of pressure
release the tension on the strings then tune them in this order
1. 6th string
2. 1st string
3. 2nd string
4. 5th string
5. 3rd string
6. 4th string
and keep doing this until you get the perfect pitch (it will take about 10 tunings or more in that order but for floating bridges every string that adds / releases tension affects all the other 5 thats why you must follow that pattern to kind of equalize the pressure)
if you did it at least once and bridge is still to high report back here :P
the bridge must be perfectly parallel to the body
Last edited by CastiConnubii at Jul 10, 2010,
#3
is this your first time?
your supposed to do one string at a time but dont fret now you just have to loosen them all until its flat and tighten them little by little to balance the tension between the springs and strings
#5
Quote by CastiConnubii
nothing wrong with it, too much pressure coming from the strings, it's probably not in tune yet and some strings add alot of pressure
release the tension on the strings then tune them in this order
1. 6th string
2. 1st string
3. 2nd string
4. 5th string
5. 3rd string
6. 4th string
and keep doing this until you get the perfect pitch (it will take about 10 tunings or more in that order but for floating bridges every string that adds / releases tension affects all the other 5 thats why you must follow that pattern to kind of equalize the pressure)
if you did it at least once and bridge is still to high report back here :P
the bridge must be perfectly parallel to the body


you could be there until the the 32nd of julember trying that.


you need to balance the tension between the springs and the strings.

adjust the springs in the back clockwise a 1/4 of a turn each and retune, repeat the process until the baseplate of the trem is parallel to the body.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGzrL88nfkc ibanez educationational vid
#6
Quote by ibanezgod1973
you could be there until the the 32nd of julember trying that.


you need to balance the tension between the springs and the strings.

adjust the springs in the back clockwise a 1/4 of a turn each and retune, repeat the process until the baseplate of the trem is parallel to the body.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGzrL88nfkc ibanez educationational vid

i wouldnt listen to that post if i were you
you need to get the guitar perfectly in tune to see how the bridge is after that, if its the same gauge and same tuning it should look exactly how it looked before changing the strings
"balancing" the tensions is the worst thing you could do at this point since its not in tune and obviously string tension changes every time you loosen / tighten a string
i still suggest you tune it perfectly first and then check the bridge
#7
who you going to listen to, me, 23 years experience and consistently gives accurate info (over 3000 posts) or someone who joined the forum yesterday.......

guess we`ll wait for someone-else to offer up their advice
#8
Just because you know one way of doing something doesn't invalidate someone else's method, especially if you base your superior knowledge on ''I've been on this forum longer''.
#9
i agree with ibanezgod on this, this is exactly how i did my ibanez when i bought it.
Bands I've seen:
Jet
Metallica
Lamb of God
Baroness
A Day To Remember
Underoath
Northlane
In The Walls
Saints Alight
Live As A Monster
Bleach The Skies
Red Ribbon Army
The Amity Affliction
Madisonfoxx
Buried In Verona
#10
[quote="'[Azrael"]']Just because you know one way of doing something doesn't invalidate someone else's method, especially if you base your superior knowledge on ''I've been on this forum longer''.


agree with you on that one but ibanezgod does help out a lot on the forums and always gives accurate info.

the other method would take billions of minutes longer before you'd have your floyd done you have to admit that.
#11
Quote by ibanezgod1973
you could be there until the the 32nd of julember trying that.


you need to balance the tension between the springs and the strings.

adjust the springs in the back clockwise a 1/4 of a turn each and retune, repeat the process until the baseplate of the trem is parallel to the body.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGzrL88nfkc ibanez educationational vid


+100000

this guy knows what hes talking bout, this is exactly right
#12
Quote by wolvenrick
agree with you on that one but ibanezgod does help out a lot on the forums and always gives accurate info.

the other method would take billions of minutes longer before you'd have your floyd done you have to admit that.

well, that is what i do and what any sane person does when they change strings, when the strings are in tune the bridge will be under the exact same pressure it was before changing the strings thus in the correct position, messing around with the screws before its in tune sounds pointless to me, i have to admit i never tried that loosen / tighten screws before because it sounds stupid to me, why adjust spring tension when spring tension is just find, oh well, thats what i did on my guitars, you are free to do whatever you want on yours
#13
Quote by CastiConnubii
i wouldnt listen to that post if i were you
you need to get the guitar perfectly in tune to see how the bridge is after that, if its the same gauge and same tuning it should look exactly how it looked before changing the strings
"balancing" the tensions is the worst thing you could do at this point since its not in tune and obviously string tension changes every time you loosen / tighten a string
i still suggest you tune it perfectly first and then check the bridge

If he's not in tune yet its going to be even worse when it is tuned. Do what ibanezgod suggested, tighten the claw springs a bit and then tune it, if its still high tighten the claw more. Once you get close you'll probably need to make small adjustments 3-4 times until its perfectly level. You want the knife edges (little rectangles you can see on the side of the trem) to be parallel to the body.
#15
Quote by CastiConnubii
i wouldnt listen to that post if i were you
you need to get the guitar perfectly in tune to see how the bridge is after that, if its the same gauge and same tuning it should look exactly how it looked before changing the strings
"balancing" the tensions is the worst thing you could do at this point since its not in tune and obviously string tension changes every time you loosen / tighten a string
i still suggest you tune it perfectly first and then check the bridge

Yeah, IF it's the same gauge and tuning. But there's no point in 'getting in perfect pitch', if you can see already how much the bridge is being pulled out by the strings.
If the TS hasn't tried to tune the guitar yet, then yes, try tuning it first with a 'hopscotch' pattern on the strings. If he has tuned it to (or close to) perfect pitch, and the trem is already being pulled out this hard, he should've slacked the strings immediately and increase tension on the springs in the back (TS, you can find this in the video Ibanezgod posted, or in the thread-link in my signature) before more damage is done. Point is, you (CastiConnubii and Ibanezgod) both have a valid point, but you're both addressing different problems.

The 'hopscotch pattern' I talked about (for lack of a better name) that works quickest for me:

E - e - E - A - E - e - A - B - E - e - A - B etc. 
or
6 - 1 - 6 - 5 - 6 - 1 - 5 - 2 - 6 - 1 - 5 - 2 - etc 

I wrote that up real quick, but the point and idea is to check up on every string you've tuned after you get a new one up to tune. For beginners that don't know their trem yet, this should be the quickest and easiest way to do it without getting frustrated. Also, if by the time you reach the D (and then G) string the bridge is already painfully pulling up, go ahead and slacken the strings and increase the tension on the springs in the back. There's no point in tuning those up too, because they'll only add more tension resulting in more bridge pull up.

I hope this helps.
Last edited by Y00p at Jul 10, 2010,
#16
Quote by Y00p
Yeah, IF it's the same gauge and tuning. But there's no point in 'getting in perfect pitch', if you can see already how much the bridge is being pulled out by the strings.

well he said " I'd assume it were the same gauge/company as before, seeing as it came with it all." so they are probably the same gauge

and yes, not perfect pitch but like close, not just to tune it once and then check again, they should definately be close
#17
Quote by CastiConnubii
well he said " I'd assume it were the same gauge/company as before, seeing as it came with it all." so they are probably the same gauge

and yes, not perfect pitch but like close, not just to tune it once and then check again, they should definately be close

They should be close, no perfect even, when you're doing *final* setup on the bridge, to perfectly level it, not when you're 'getting it in the ballpark' (as this guy is). If for instance your changing tunings from D to E, and when you've tuned all but two strings up you notice the bridge is already pulling out, there's no need or point whatsoever to even try and get the other two in tune. There's no way in known-to-man physics that tuning those two strings up will result in the bridge falling. IE, get that spring tension increased ASAP.

And never assume anything. The saying goes 'it makes an ass out of 'u' and 'me', but in this case, it's mostly you.
Last edited by Y00p at Jul 10, 2010,
#18


Got it a bit better, but now it's a bit too low I can tell. Was a bit rushed though. Thanks for all the help guys.
Arms Of Empire
^ ^ ^ Band I am involved in ^ ^ ^
Please check it out? ;D


Axe FX II + EBMM JP6 + Jackson DK2S
#20
Quote by ibanezgod1973
that`s not a bit better it`s almost perfect, glad to of helped

Yep, that looks pretty much perfect.
No wait, it looks like the knife edge is falling a bid on the back, yeah. I was looking at the trem body.
Last edited by Y00p at Jul 10, 2010,
#21
that`s why i said "almost", probably a 1/8th of a turn anti clockwise and he`ll be there
Last edited by ibanezgod1973 at Jul 10, 2010,