#1
So I have never recorded anything before, but just want to make sure that I have the necessary equipment to record.

I need to buy an audio interface to record from the microphones and guitars to my computer. I am planning to buy something cheap, Alesis MultiMix 4 USB that can be found here: http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/MultiMix4USB/

I need to buy mixing software to mix all the tracks together. I will probably buy reaper.

I also need a computer which I have. I am going to use my father's guitars and microphones to record onto the computer. I'm not quite sure that I understand this, but I plug the microphones into the audio interface, and also in the amps, and then I am able to play with my guitar, and it will record in the computer? My friend tried to explain this to me, and I tried to do a little research on this, but I may have still gotten this wrong.
#2
you plug your guitar into your amp as if you were normaly playing, not recording...

you put a mic in front of your amp, so that the mic picks up the sound comping out of the cab. mic is connected to the interface and interface is connected to comp.

and yes... you have all you need...

ps make sure you have phantom power on your interface if you're useing condenser mics
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#3
I just use a microphone, Audacity, and my guitar...
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#4
Quote by ChucklesMginty
Well, you don't plug the microphone into the amp. You place it in front of the speaker.

The only other thing you'll need is microphone stand if you don't have one already. And yeah, you're set with that.


lol, do not plug the mic in the amp
#5
Im doin alright with a Tascam DP004, a guitar and an Amp... nothing like programs screwing around while your trying to get an idea down... or a comp problem taking out an entire near finished work or something. Plus you can record using batteries and an acoustic out in the middle of a lake if you want to...
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#6
Quote by ChucklesMginty
So you use a microphone into your computer's line-in with an un-amplified guitar?


Actually I don't record electric guitar lol.
I record acoustic :P
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#7
you should try recording through an audio interface and into your computer, and use a vst plugin amp. but either way works.
#8
Quote by darwindrummer
you should try recording through an audio interface and into your computer, and use a vst plugin amp. but either way works.


Yeah, this way you don't need to worry about mic placement. Just get an interface with enough inputs for whatever you plan on recording and get a free (or commercial if you want) amp sim. I recommend revalver mkII or III but nick crow's stuff is good as well as lepou plugins. Then just use some cab impulses and tweak it until you've got a good sound.
#9
The one thing everybody always forgets about is proper monitors.

You can't mix for crap on stereo speakers.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Quote by axemanchris
The one thing everybody always forgets about is proper monitors.

You can't mix for crap on stereo speakers.

CT


To be fair, you can't mix for crap in an untreated room. I have horrible acoustics in my room, it makes me sad.

Apart from that, look like you're set.
#11
You have the basics, but there's one problem I can see. That particular mixer uses a USB 1.1 connection. While this will work, USB 2.0 is preferable. Try looking at some of the other USB mixers in the multimix family. Some of them use 2.0 (it will usually say so in the product title. If its just called a USB mixer, it generally uses 1.1).
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Last edited by treepoop at Jul 16, 2010,
#12
Quote by mh.666
To be fair, you can't mix for crap in an untreated room. I have horrible acoustics in my room, it makes me sad.

Apart from that, look like you're set.


Yes you can, its all up to the engineer's skill though. Especially if everything is recorded directly into the interface.
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#13
Quote by RBM01991
Yes you can, its all up to the engineer's skill though. Especially if everything is recorded directly into the interface.


So when various bands of frequency fluctuate massively in volume you can create an accurate mix? Running just through the bass frequencies with a sine wave generator I notice that around 90Hz doubles in volume and around 120-130 it halves in volume. How can you possibly create an accurate mix with that?
#14
Quote by mh.666
So when various bands of frequency fluctuate massively in volume you can create an accurate mix? Running just through the bass frequencies with a sine wave generator I notice that around 90Hz doubles in volume and around 120-130 it halves in volume. How can you possibly create an accurate mix with that?


Easy, recording each part separate, and then mixing them in a competent DAW. Unless you're recording live, which then you do need a room with a completely flat bass response, but if everything is being done through Pro Tools with each part recorded separate...then you can create an accurate mix in your living room, provided that you know what you're doing.
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
2010 Carvin ST300C
1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
Jackson/Charvel Star W/ Custom Graphics.
Ovation CP 247 Acoustic
Line 6 POD HD Pro X
Pro Tools 9

Tutorial: Studio Quality Programmed Drum Sounds
#15
mh.666 has a point. Nodes in rooms cause frequency build-ups and such that give it a certain sound - just like a mic has a certain sound. In this case, though, a flat sound is the only thing that will complement a mix.

Depending on the dimensions of your room, you might have a spot where your 80hz frequencies are hugely underrepresented and at that same spot, where frequencies around 16khz are over-represented. This is how your ears hear the room.... so what happens? Your mixes are bottom heavy and they lack a lot of detail on the top end.

That said, I will still say that, although technically correct, decent monitors are about 20x more significant than a treated room.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.