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#1
I've decided to build a new DAW from scratch, I have been trying to search the web for useful information about what is the best setup for a DAW but the information i find is very brief or outdated. So far i have some things down,

Case - Antec 900 - For airflow, size and general asthetics
Cooling - Needs a decent cooling system for over clocking (not sure what cooling system)
Noise - Needs quite components because it will be in the room with microphones.
Connectivity - Will probably need a USB card and extra MIDI ports on the PCI

I also have a dual monitor setup. I read somewhere a powerful graphics card will take the strain of the CPU, any ideas on what graphics card will handle 2 1680x1050 without leaving anywork for the cpu?

Now the stuff im really unsure about, CPUs, RAM, Motherboards and soundcards.

I cant find much information on how VSTs and general music production use CPU power. I need to know how to balance the amount of cores and GHz they offer. Is it better for more speed or more cores?

The same applys to ram, do i go with Mhz and DDR or GB?

And the part i am most confused is what sound card to go with. im open ideas to any ideas/information you can give me on this.

If you know of any up to date websites or information i could read on this topic please do share

thanks for your time, please post any thought/advice you have thanks.
#2
Watercooling is your best option for silent cooling that allows for big OC's. As for RAM, MHz and DDR refer to the speed and interface, respectively. It's more important to have faster ram, but make sure your mobo can support it. You'll still need a good bit of memory though, but only get 4 GB's if you're running a 32-bit OS (that's the most that a 32-bit OS can utilize), and if you're running 64-bit, I'd recommend 8. As for the sound card, any high end HD audio card will do. Also, dual monitor setups split the resolution between the two displays unless you're using DisplayPort. Most graphics cards can support that as long as it's within their maximum resolution, and as long as you won't be doing much gaming, you won't have to spend much money on it.

Also, I wouldn't recommend doing your own watercooling setup if you've never done it before. Get someone else to do it.
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Last edited by JagerSlushy at Jul 10, 2010,
#3
get a core i5 system with 6gb of RAM and windows 7 64 bit. Any graphics card will do, I suggest a Radeon 5550 because it's pretty cheap and will do the job.
For your motherboard I suggest going with MSI brand. (I work in a pc shop and while tons of people swear by ASUS I constantly see dead or defective ones come though)

You may need firewire ports depending on what interface you decide to use.

VSTs generally use up RAM and not cpu, that's why I suggest having 6gb.
#4
Quote by JagerSlushy
Watercooling is your best option for silent cooling that allows for big OC's. As for RAM, MHz and DDR refer to the speed and interface, respectively. It's more important to have faster ram, but make sure your mobo can support it. You'll still need a good bit of memory though, but only get 4 GB's if you're running a 32-bit OS (that's the most that a 32-bit OS can utilize), and if you're running 64-bit, I'd recommend 8. As for the sound card, any high end HD audio card will do. Also, dual monitor setups split the resolution between the two displays unless you're using DisplayPort. Most graphics cards can support that as long as it's within their maximum resolution, and as long as you won't be doing much gaming, you won't have to spend much money on it.

Also, I wouldn't recommend doing your own watercooling setup if you've never done it before. Get someone else to do it.


Fortunately, water cooling is too expensive for me to afford and also very impractical due to the location of the computer. Thanks for the memory advice, i will be using 6 or 8 in a 64-bit environment. And with the sound card, these onboard souncards say they support HD audio. Or do i need something that support 24-bit/96hrz?
#5
Quote by iduno871
get a core i5 system with 6gb of RAM and windows 7 64 bit. Any graphics card will do, I suggest a Radeon 5550 because it's pretty cheap and will do the job.
For your motherboard I suggest going with MSI brand. (I work in a pc shop and while tons of people swear by ASUS I constantly see dead or defective ones come though)

You may need firewire ports depending on what interface you decide to use.

VSTs generally use up RAM and not cpu, that's why I suggest having 6gb.



I forgot to mention i wasn't sure about which processor, what are the pros/cons with intel or amd when it comes to music production?
#6
I would like to dis-reccomend Windows 7. I keep reading stories how it wont work with their DAW, various plugins, I Think I may have read one with superior drummer, or DFH not working 'cause of Windows 7.
..I was watching my death.
#7
Quote by Xisuma
I forgot to mention i wasn't sure about which processor, what are the pros/cons with intel or amd when it comes to music production?

Intel makes better processors, they run faster when clocked at the same core frequencies, and they are much better for overclocking because they stay much cooler than AMD's. But they're also more expensive.
Quote by Tone Deaf
Someone has had too much jager in their slushy. :/
Quote by CL/\SH
First person on UG to be a grammar nazi and use the correct form of "your" in the correct context.

+ 70 virgins to you, my good sir.

Quote by Fassa Albrecht
Girls DO fap...I don't though.
#8
Quote by timbit2006
I would like to dis-reccomend Windows 7. I keep reading stories how it wont work with their DAW, various plugins, I Think I may have read one with superior drummer, or DFH not working 'cause of Windows 7.


XP ftmfw, TS if you can, upper end i7's can run pretty much anything but theres also a huge price tag. If you have the money then definitely go for that
#9
You definitely do not need water cooling. Especially with that case's tri-cool fans. As far as DAWs go, you'll most likely not max out the performance of the CPU whereas RAM is much easier to utilize to the max. An i5 750 or an i7 930/950 should be fine for you. Also, I'm not sure who in the world said VSTs can't run on Win7. I'm using Win7 x64 and I'm running pretty much every VST ever created. So VSTs won't be a problem. If anything you'll want to stay away from OSX because not many vendors create VSTs for that platform.
Last edited by Mandeep at Jul 10, 2010,
#10
Quote by timbit2006
I would like to dis-reccomend Windows 7. I keep reading stories how it wont work with their DAW, various plugins, I Think I may have read one with superior drummer, or DFH not working 'cause of Windows 7.


I have been using Windows 7 for a while now and id have to disagree and say i personally recommend it, i may not have used it for a wide range of VSts, but i haven't had any problems with any of the ones i use, including dfh and all the ezdrummer drum kits. The performance of my computer in general seems far superior to XP.

But this is PCs were talking about they always have different results for different people. If u have a spare HD, why not install windos 7 on it and see if you'll encounter any problems with your DAW. If you don't i think you'll find windows 7 is far superior to work in than XP
#11
Quote by Mandeep
You definitely do not need water cooling. Especially with that case's tri-cool fans. As far as DAWs go, you'll most likely not max out the performance of the CPU whereas RAM is much easier to utilize to the max. An i5 750 or an i7 930/950 should be fine for you. Also, I'm not sure who in the world said VSTs can't run on Win7. I'm using Win7 x64 and I'm running pretty much every VST ever created. So VSTs won't be a problem. If anything you'll want to stay away from OSX because not many vendors create VSTs for that platform.


Im currently running a Athlon x2 64-bit 5600+ (2 2.8 cores) with 6GB DDR2 @311mhz (3.25GB useable due to an addressing problem with my soundcard) . And when im mixing about 16 tracks, they all have compressors, multiband EQs, theres 3 podfarms and trilian. This maxes out my cpus and ram. If i had all 6 GB would my cpu usage drop off?
#12
Quote by Comrade Curry
XP ftmfw, TS if you can, upper end i7's can run pretty much anything but theres also a huge price tag. If you have the money then definitely go for that


At the moment im just outlining what to be getting, when it comes to buying it, depending on my funds i will be balancing the cost of each item to get the best preformance for my budget
#13
Quote by Xisuma
Im currently running a Athlon x2 64-bit 5600+ (2 2.8 cores) with 6GB DDR2 @311mhz (3.25GB useable due to an addressing problem with my soundcard) . And when im mixing about 16 tracks, they all have compressors, multiband EQs, theres 3 podfarms and trilian. This maxes out my cpus and ram. If i had all 6 GB would my cpu usage drop off?


Your CPU usage probably wouldn't see any beneficial drop. Considering it's such an outdated processor, you most likely need to build a new system. Even 6gb of that slow DDR2 wouldn't help. If you're on a tight budget you could always look at the i3 Intel line or any of the new AMD processors.
Last edited by Mandeep at Jul 11, 2010,
#14
Do you have any experience with audio production in the first place?

It seems like you've done little to no research on what people use when recording music.
You won't be using some form of stock "sound card"
You will be using a interface.
Most likely FireWire as it is better for recording multiple tracks of audio at the same time then USB 2.0

You will need a firewire card, most likely a Texas Instruments one as I have heard they are the best for such applications.

How far do you want to go with this?
If you intend on recording bands and such i suggest getting two 500gb drives.
Or two 1tb drives.

i7 or i5 processor.

Upwards of 2gb's of ram.

You really just have to use common sense and look in the right places for information on building a DAW.

this forum is certainly not the correct place to be asking such a question as I've never really seen anyone with any audio production experience post here.

Also, the noise isn't that big of an issue.
As long as you aren't running heaps of cards with fans on them you should be in the clear.

In a mix you really won't be able to hear any additional noise(depending on what you are doing of course)


EDIT: you also need to factor in buying an interface and the costs.
http://cgi.ebay.com/Focusrite-Saffire-pro-40-saffire40-STOCK-NEW-YORK-/110556073802?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19bda7cf4a#ht_3858wt_1137

Reasonably cheap and highly recommended.
Last edited by wongacaster at Jul 11, 2010,
#15
Quote by wongacaster
Do you have any experience with audio production in the first place?

It seems like you've done little to no research on what people use when recording music.
You won't be using some form of stock "sound card"
You will be using a interface.
Most likely FireWire as it is better for recording multiple tracks of audio at the same time then USB 2.0

You will need a firewire card, most likely a Texas Instruments one as I have heard they are the best for such applications.

How far do you want to go with this?
If you intend on recording bands and such i suggest getting two 500gb drives.
Or two 1tb drives.

i7 or i5 processor.

Upwards of 2gb's of ram.

You really just have to use common sense and look in the right places for information on building a DAW.

this forum is certainly not the correct place to be asking such a question as I've never really seen anyone with any audio production experience post here.

Also, the noise isn't that big of an issue.
As long as you aren't running heaps of cards with fans on them you should be in the clear.

In a mix you really won't be able to hear any additional noise(depending on what you are doing of course)


EDIT: you also need to factor in buying an interface and the costs.
http://cgi.ebay.com/Focusrite-Saffire-pro-40-saffire40-STOCK-NEW-YORK-/110556073802?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19bda7cf4a#ht_3858wt_1137

Reasonably cheap and highly recommended.


i have been using fruity loops for a few years, and now im recording instruments and mixing demos of tracks that im going to make into a CD. So i might be a total amateur, but im enthusiastic and getting some good results with my music at the moment. Im also trying to move over to reaper, but that program isn't to user friendly.

As far as research goes, i have been researching for a long time, but it is very difficult for me to find relevant information, or at least something that isn't outdated. I find it difficult to get answers out of reading, i usually just end up asking someone directly because they will be relating directly to me.

By stock sound card would you be referring to a creative one? Ive had a look at this Saffire pro and im struggling to picture where it fits in to my recording process. I imagine it means i can plug in a bunch of instruments and have a jam or record simultaneously? also does it allow me to use my own VSTs on it?

As far as im going with this? well i am currently working on setting up a record label so i can legitimately release my own music. I also have friend who want to record music and put it out on my label. From there im just going to see where that goes but i will always be writing and recording music and i want to keep improving at these things.

I have 2TB and 2 backing it up.

Thanks for your post and your time. can you recommend a place to get the right sort of information? i just stumbled onto www.soundonsound.com a magazine i used to read i will be having a look there next.
#16
This really should be in Riffs & Recordings.

*reported for move*
..I was watching my death.
#17
Quote by timbit2006
This really should be in Riffs & Recordings.

*reported for move*


but its not about riffs, and its not about recording
#18
Quote by timbit2006
This really should be in Riffs & Recordings.

*reported for move*




Quote by Xisuma
but its not about riffs, and its not about recording


do you need any more help?
#19
Quote by Mandeep



do you need any more help?


Seriously...
What the ****.
I'm just trying to help the guy out.
I used to gon on R&R quite a bit, but stopped recently. There were questions like this there from time to time.

Also, Riffs & Recordings may not be the greatest name for that forum.
It also includes gear suggestions, and stuff. The main page is for that.

EDIT: Where is that guy from?
..I was watching my death.
#20
Really, I'm in the wrong forum (website) all together but this the only decent place i can find for good help. You people recommended i get a Line 6 UX 1, and it turned out to be perfect for me.
#21
Quote by Xisuma
Really, I'm in the wrong forum (website) all together but this the only decent place i can find for good help. You people recommended i get a Line 6 UX 1, and it turned out to be perfect for me.


What do you mean you're in the wrong Forum?
The Line 6 Toneport thingy is decent. I don't own one personally, but tried one. It doesn't really suit my needs though. I wanted an 8 channel interface.
..I was watching my death.
#22
Quote by timbit2006



EDIT: Where is that guy from?


That's Erik Estrada from Chips.
#23
Quote by Xisuma
i have been using fruity loops for a few years, and now im recording instruments and mixing demos of tracks that im going to make into a CD. So i might be a total amateur, but im enthusiastic and getting some good results with my music at the moment. Im also trying to move over to reaper, but that program isn't to user friendly.

As far as research goes, i have been researching for a long time, but it is very difficult for me to find relevant information, or at least something that isn't outdated. I find it difficult to get answers out of reading, i usually just end up asking someone directly because they will be relating directly to me.

By stock sound card would you be referring to a creative one? Ive had a look at this Saffire pro and im struggling to picture where it fits in to my recording process. I imagine it means i can plug in a bunch of instruments and have a jam or record simultaneously? also does it allow me to use my own VSTs on it?

As far as im going with this? well i am currently working on setting up a record label so i can legitimately release my own music. I also have friend who want to record music and put it out on my label. From there im just going to see where that goes but i will always be writing and recording music and i want to keep improving at these things.

I have 2TB and 2 backing it up.

Thanks for your post and your time. can you recommend a place to get the right sort of information? i just stumbled onto www.soundonsound.com a magazine i used to read i will be having a look there next.


If you're using FL and reaper and want to build a DAW for what seems to be more of a hobby than anything then save yourself the trouble and dont buy a machine that you really dont need. Instead i would recommend spending it on an interface with pro tools, and maybe some upgrades for your current comp, so you can learn your way around that, because thats pretty much the music recording industry is going, well that and tape, but the latter is just going to run your debt through the roof.
#24
Quote by Xisuma
i have been using fruity loops for a few years, and now im recording instruments and mixing demos of tracks that im going to make into a CD. So i might be a total amateur, but im enthusiastic and getting some good results with my music at the moment. Im also trying to move over to reaper, but that program isn't to user friendly.

As far as research goes, i have been researching for a long time, but it is very difficult for me to find relevant information, or at least something that isn't outdated. I find it difficult to get answers out of reading, i usually just end up asking someone directly because they will be relating directly to me.

By stock sound card would you be referring to a creative one? Ive had a look at this Saffire pro and im struggling to picture where it fits in to my recording process. I imagine it means i can plug in a bunch of instruments and have a jam or record simultaneously? also does it allow me to use my own VSTs on it?

As far as im going with this? well i am currently working on setting up a record label so i can legitimately release my own music. I also have friend who want to record music and put it out on my label. From there im just going to see where that goes but i will always be writing and recording music and i want to keep improving at these things.

I have 2TB and 2 backing it up.

Thanks for your post and your time. can you recommend a place to get the right sort of information? i just stumbled onto www.soundonsound.com a magazine i used to read i will be having a look there next.


Sorry if I came off as a douche last comment.
Wasn't having the greatest day.

From my experience Reaper has been the MOST user friendly I've used(Pro tools, Cubase/Nuendo, Ableton)
EXTREMELY easy to use, ESPECIALLY if you read the manual(which everyone seems to neglect)
Reaper is extremely customizable.
Can look how you want.
Keys can function how you want.
It comes with great plugins from the second you download it.
Pretty much everything you need to produce a record right from the get go without having to buy plugins or anything else.

I know what you mean about that, it always seems better to just ask the question instead of trying to relate to someone elses question.

Yes, because in this game(recording music at a amateur/professional/whatever level) you WON'T be using a stock(creative etc) sound card to listen back or to record your music.
You will be using you interface(most likely FireWire for the reason I said before) as the converters will be better and are purpose built for high quality audio re-production.

The saffire pro is a very good unit for its price, offering good converters and good onboard pres and plenty of in's and out's.
You seem to think that your interface has anything to do with your use of VST's the ONLY interfaces where this matters is if you are using Pro Tools, then you can't even use VST's(unless you have a VST to RTAS wrapper) you have to use RTAS plugins(or TDM, but i doubt you are going to get a HD system)

Okay, so at this point in time you want the best bang for your buck really.
Have you thought about how much you are going to budget for monitors(speakers)?
Thats a whole other can of worms in its self.
Same as the interface choice.


With the hard drive thing, it is better to have two different drives.
One with all your system files etc and one with your recording stuff on it.
Google "optimizing my computer for recording" or something like that.
It will help you get a firmer grasp on why you should split it up between two drives(less cluttered drives, easier for the computer to find things straight away etc)

What type of music are you recording?

The first place i would advise you to join up to is GearSlutz
Although, in this game A LOT of different opinions and "facts" will be thrown at you, so really be willing to look at every side of a story and opinion so you don't go jumping into buying something that wasn't right for you.

Also, about what Comrade Curry said.
Pro Tools may be the dominator of the industry.
But that in no way means YOU need to use it.
MANY producers of good high quality recordings don't use Pro Tools.
I doubt you have a massive budget so a PT HD rig would be out of the question.
So you buying say an 003 or 002 or an MBOX or something would be a waste of money IMO as there are better Interfaces for the price out there.

Cheers.
#25
Quote by wongacaster
Also, about what Comrade Curry said.
Pro Tools may be the dominator of the industry.
But that in no way means YOU need to use it.
MANY producers of good high quality recordings don't use Pro Tools.
I doubt you have a massive budget so a PT HD rig would be out of the question.
So you buying say an 003 or 002 or an MBOX or something would be a waste of money IMO as there are better Interfaces for the price out there.

Cheers.



True, I said nothing about HD or even using an mbox as an interface, more of a learning thing and only if that cash could be spared but put maybe the TS should take a look away from the computer and maybe put some cash into some mics, maybe some rackmount effects, possibly even soundproofing, theres more to a studio than just a DAW and some VSTs

#26
Quote by timbit2006
What do you mean you're in the wrong Forum?
The Line 6 Toneport thingy is decent. I don't own one personally, but tried one. It doesn't really suit my needs though. I wanted an 8 channel interface.



i just meant there that this website is dedicated to guitars, not audio and sound studio etc
#27
Quote by Comrade Curry
If you're using FL and reaper and want to build a DAW for what seems to be more of a hobby than anything then save yourself the trouble and dont buy a machine that you really dont need. Instead i would recommend spending it on an interface with pro tools, and maybe some upgrades for your current comp, so you can learn your way around that, because thats pretty much the music recording industry is going, well that and tape, but the latter is just going to run your debt through the roof.


it may be a hobby, but im very passionate about it. I have written a lot of music, which i want to record and produce myself, i also have friends who want me to record them. So there will always be something for me to do, My problem is at the moment my pc cant handle the work load i want to run on it, and i cant upgrade my processor anymore so getting a new DAW is the option for me, but i want to get a very powerful one that has the room to expand so as i keep trying to take this further, i will have the power for it and the room to expand.
#28
Quote by wongacaster
Sorry if I came off as a douche last comment.
Wasn't having the greatest day.

From my experience Reaper has been the MOST user friendly I've used(Pro tools, Cubase/Nuendo, Ableton)
EXTREMELY easy to use, ESPECIALLY if you read the manual(which everyone seems to neglect)
Reaper is extremely customizable.
Can look how you want.
Keys can function how you want.
It comes with great plugins from the second you download it.
Pretty much everything you need to produce a record right from the get go without having to buy plugins or anything else.

I know what you mean about that, it always seems better to just ask the question instead of trying to relate to someone elses question.

Yes, because in this game(recording music at a amateur/professional/whatever level) you WON'T be using a stock(creative etc) sound card to listen back or to record your music.
You will be using you interface(most likely FireWire for the reason I said before) as the converters will be better and are purpose built for high quality audio re-production.

The saffire pro is a very good unit for its price, offering good converters and good onboard pres and plenty of in's and out's.
You seem to think that your interface has anything to do with your use of VST's the ONLY interfaces where this matters is if you are using Pro Tools, then you can't even use VST's(unless you have a VST to RTAS wrapper) you have to use RTAS plugins(or TDM, but i doubt you are going to get a HD system)

Okay, so at this point in time you want the best bang for your buck really.
Have you thought about how much you are going to budget for monitors(speakers)?
Thats a whole other can of worms in its self.
Same as the interface choice.


With the hard drive thing, it is better to have two different drives.
One with all your system files etc and one with your recording stuff on it.
Google "optimizing my computer for recording" or something like that.
It will help you get a firmer grasp on why you should split it up between two drives(less cluttered drives, easier for the computer to find things straight away etc)

What type of music are you recording?

The first place i would advise you to join up to is GearSlutz
Although, in this game A LOT of different opinions and "facts" will be thrown at you, so really be willing to look at every side of a story and opinion so you don't go jumping into buying something that wasn't right for you.

Also, about what Comrade Curry said.
Pro Tools may be the dominator of the industry.
But that in no way means YOU need to use it.
MANY producers of good high quality recordings don't use Pro Tools.
I doubt you have a massive budget so a PT HD rig would be out of the question.
So you buying say an 003 or 002 or an MBOX or something would be a waste of money IMO as there are better Interfaces for the price out there.

Cheers.


Thanks for the response. Just to double check, say i got a Focusrite Saffire PRO 40. i would be routing all my sound in too it and back out through the fire wire interface, so that it processes my audio? This means i could have that and a cheap creative sound card so i can keep there nice midi sounds and crystallizer right?

When it comes to monitors i read quite a lot about them, and from what i gather they are supposed to be the most neutral sound, except there is no definite neutral sound so they all sound a little different, I will probably be buying one with lots of good reviews in my price range.

With HDs i am going to keep my 1.5TB for all data, i will give my 500GB away and replace it with either a 10,000rpm or a SSD.

I have read similar things about pro tools and reaper which is why i choose reaper. There is a fairly big step from the simplicity of FL to Reaper. but im sure ill use it in time, and i have been using the manual, but your right it is very useful, i will give it more of a read.

Thanks for the responce it has been very useful
#29
Quote by wongacaster
What type of music are you recording?


Forgot to answer your question there. I mainly do metal and its extreme sub-genres. However i have written a few electronic tracks, some dark ambient songs, some symphonic tracks and some hip hop.

Im a metalhead, but i also love hip hop, classical and lots of stuff inbetween. And id always be wanting to try and record/mix/write different things.
#30
Quote by Xisuma
Thanks for the response. Just to double check, say i got a Focusrite Saffire PRO 40. i would be routing all my sound in too it and back out through the fire wire interface, so that it processes my audio? This means i could have that and a cheap creative sound card so i can keep there nice midi sounds and crystallizer right?


I wouldn't bet the farm on it. Especially if you're using ASIO.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#31
Quote by eddiehimself
I wouldn't bet the farm on it. Especially if you're using ASIO.


sorry i don't understand what your try to imply
#32
Quote by Xisuma
sorry i don't understand what your try to imply


ASIO only likes having one driver activated at a time. Besides, in terms of sound, you can do better than creative midi to be honest. You should try looking at getting some virtual instruments or something?
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#33
Quote by eddiehimself
ASIO only likes having one driver activated at a time. Besides, in terms of sound, you can do better than creative midi to be honest. You should try looking at getting some virtual instruments or something?


Well in the writing process i use Guitar Pro, and i really like the sounds creative have cause im used to using them.

When it comes into turning all that into audio, i have my Line 6 UX1 for guitars and bass, however im currently using the VST "trilian" to play bass because i dont have a bass guitar. Drums i use ezdrummer and will be getting Supperior Drummer soon. (im totaly happy with using a drum machine). Vocals i have a MIC for but have yet had a vocalist down to do any recording, but im sure it will go ok. Then im stuck when it comes to synth, i have a few VSTs that arn't any good. Im looking to make sounds like this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTbRQBb7cog . From what i read it requires some expensive hardware to pull off. Do you have any experience with that kinda stuff? or know any VSTs that make thoose kind of synths?

and ASIO on my computer directly relates to the performance when making music. If i turn it off, my recorded tracks on HD go laggy and there are latency problems.
#34
Quote by Xisuma
Well in the writing process i use Guitar Pro, and i really like the sounds creative have cause im used to using them.


I had exactly the same issue when switching out the creative soundcard on my PC. I ended up just using the windows GS wavetable synth and yes it is from 1996 and doesn't sound the best but to be honest you don't really need the best sound when you're just writing material, imo. I actually like the sounds of the drums on there better than the creative though, as sad as that may sound lolz.

When it comes into turning all that into audio, i have my Line 6 UX1 for guitars and bass, however im currently using the VST "trilian" to play bass because i dont have a bass guitar. Drums i use ezdrummer and will be getting Supperior Drummer soon. (im totaly happy with using a drum machine). Vocals i have a MIC for but have yet had a vocalist down to do any recording, but im sure it will go ok. Then im stuck when it comes to synth, i have a few VSTs that arn't any good. Im looking to make sounds like this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTbRQBb7cog . From what i read it requires some expensive hardware to pull off. Do you have any experience with that kinda stuff? or know any VSTs that make thoose kind of synths?


There is plenty to be getting on with in terms of virtual instruments on the market. I don't know myself but i'm sure there is probably what you're looking for in terms of synth sounds in a software package created somewhere. I got a couple of quite nice sounding synths packaged with cakewalk in fact. Sorry i can't be of any more help than that though.

and ASIO on my computer directly relates to the performance when making music. If i turn it off, my recorded tracks on HD go laggy and there are latency problems.


I'm not saying by any means don't use ASIO, but it will limit you to one hardware device at a time.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#35
Quote by eddiehimself
ASIO only likes having one driver activated at a time. Besides, in terms of sound, you can do better than creative midi to be honest. You should try looking at getting some virtual instruments or something?


That frustrates me so much, when are developers going to realize that some people are going to need 2 ASIOs from time to time? TS if you want virtual instruments then look at proteus vx for lots of different sounds, theres TONS of stuff in there, but if you want something more specialized I can name you some programs if you tell me what kind of instruments you want

#36
Quote by Comrade Curry
That frustrates me so much, when are developers going to realize that some people are going to need 2 ASIOs from time to time? TS if you want virtual instruments then look at proteus vx for lots of different sounds, theres TONS of stuff in there, but if you want something more specialized I can name you some programs if you tell me what kind of instruments you want



IIRC, you can have 2 hardware devices running on ASIO simultaneously but they have to be identical so for example if i were to buy a duplicate of my M-audio delta 1010 (full version with the 19" 1U breakout box lolz) then it might possibly work but not with all soundcard models.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
Last edited by eddiehimself at Jul 13, 2010,
#37
Quote by Comrade Curry
That frustrates me so much, when are developers going to realize that some people are going to need 2 ASIOs from time to time? TS if you want virtual instruments then look at proteus vx for lots of different sounds, theres TONS of stuff in there, but if you want something more specialized I can name you some programs if you tell me what kind of instruments you want



Well Im not sure what the exact names of the instruments are. Do you listen to any symphonic black metal bands? they have the kinds of synth im after.
#38
Quote by Comrade Curry
proteus vx


i downloaded this. Doesnt make a sounds, comes with no presets or anything. am i doing something wrong? i downloaded from there offical website
#39
you have to load a bank, and I cant remember how to do that off the top of my head but if you want a good synth or 2 google arturia and go to their website, ARP 2500, CS80, Moog, Juno-8, all the really good synth emulators are pretty much made by them, there are others but not as superior. I can't say I do listen symphonic black metal bands but if you can describe a sound or something like that I can try and help you out.

#40
Quote by Xisuma
Im currently running a Athlon x2 64-bit 5600+ (2 2.8 cores) with 6GB DDR2 @311mhz (3.25GB useable due to an addressing problem with my soundcard) . And when im mixing about 16 tracks, they all have compressors, multiband EQs, theres 3 podfarms and trilian. This maxes out my cpus and ram. If i had all 6 GB would my cpu usage drop off?

1. Get a 64 bit system like XP Pro x64 or Win7 x64 or even a 64 bit Linux distribution.
2. Your CPU usage won't drop, since you have enough RAM for almost anything anyways.
3. As a last-resort-alternative you could get Windows Server 2003 32 bit and activate PAE to use 6GB with a 32 bit OS.

To TS:
What you need (need in: it's more than enough for 90% of DAW scenarios) is the following:
- Dual core CPU with current architecture (AMD Phenom II, Intel Core i5) with high clock frequency (>3GHz for the Phenom, >2.6 GHz for the i5). Quad core won't improve much since most DAW software and most VSTs are single-threaded anyways -> they only use one single core at any given time.
- RAM: 4GB should suffice. A fully uncompressed recording of 80min (in other words: a CD) is 800MB. For a 5min long song you would have 16 tracks with 5min each uncompressed in 800MB, which leaves 3.2GB for anything else (programs, OS and so on... in the end that's about 2GB free RAM). More RAM doesn't hurt though, but it might not be worth the money.
- You said you have 2TB hard drives. That's good stuff, 1TB with a back up of it is enough for lots of recordings.
- Mainboard: Take a solid one. It doesn't need all the fancy connections that exist out there. I'd say that both MSI and Gigabyte would be good brands to choose from. Price range at about 150 to 200$ and you're set.
- Graphics card: Anything other than an Intel integrated graphics card - they plainly suck. Driving two screens is of no effort to today's entry level graphics card. Hell, I even play games (3 years and older like Half-Life2 or LotRO) in Full-HD with my 40$ ATi Radeon HD4350. Just check that it has two connectors for screens and is cooled passively (that's as quiet as it gets). On a side note: You won't play upcoming games on that thing, but since it's a DAW that point doesn't matter. I'd say a Radeon HD5450 would be a good bet. Even has DX11 and other fun stuff.

Audio hardware: Get good monitors or headphones (don't be as cheap as me ^^) and a good audio interface. A relative of mine has an M-Audio interface with 8 channels input and 8 output (i.e. 4 x stereo signal). You can plug almost anything in that interface and it only needs one USB connector.
Audio software: No clue tbh. I just use Cubase 4 LE because it came along with my interface and I'm happy with it. It's not that unintuitive after a day's practise imho.

Other PC software: Windows XP (64bit version works fine for me) or Windows 7 64 bit (contrary to many opinions DAW software actually works fine on both 7 and Vista).
VirtualBox (www.virtualbox.org) to install Windows XP or Linux inside of it and use the virtual OS to surf the web safely without any risk of f'ing up your main installation with all your VSTs and stuff. That way you can also completely omit an anti virus solution for your DAW (AVs and DAWs don't go well together) and use a simple AV in the virtual OS.

I'd say you should go for a good air cooling solution (Antec case sounds like a great idea) with a huge CPU heatsink with 120mm fan (tower style). Doesn't have the same amount of headroom as a watercooled system but it's about 1/10th the price and you'll have PC that's as silent as one with watercooling. I have a watercooled PC at home and it's not that silent at all (since it still needs fans it's not more silenced). Passive watercooling solutions don't work well with overclocked CPUs (I know that from personal experience). Watercooling is a nice gimmick, but it easily gets pricey before it has any reasonable advantage over air cooling (thing 1000$+)

What ever, to sum up:
Gigabyte or MSI mainboard (I've had good experiences with both... my main PC has a Gigabyte main board, the PC I'm at right now has an 8 year old MSI board)
4GB RAM (or more), DDR3 1600MHz or faster (though you wouldn't notice)
your 2 x 1TB hard drives
passively cooled graphics card (HD5450 or similar)
Dual core or better CPU (I'd say you should get an AMD Phenom II X4, doesn't cost much and works well... if your budget is large, go for an Intel Core i7 quad core)
And good air cooling (50$ in total + computer case) instead of water cooling (~1000$ in total + computer case)

That's about it. PM me if you have any specific questions about any point. Just remember that I live in Switzerland, so I won't be able to tell you where to order stuff, just what might be a good choice
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