#1
I've recently been thinking about blocking my tremelo on my strat. A vintage style tremelo to be exact. And i was just wondering if anybody knew how it would effect my tone.
#2
Not all that much with a Strat, though it depends how you block it. If you just tiighten the spring a lot and screw down the pivot screws, it's going to sound almost exactly the same as before. If you have all five springs on and screw them in all the way, you usually end up getting a slight natural reverb effect if your bridge pickup is a single coil and you play with quite a clean, bright tone. Shove some wood in there that has been cut to fit tightly and securely and you'll start to get back some sustain and depth to your tone; really dense woods like maple work best but it doesn't make enough of a difference to worry too much about what type of wood you use. It's a good idea to make sure you fit a large brass or steel sustain/string block to the bridge as that will improve your tone and sustain much more than any wood will.
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#3
Quote by MrFlibble
really dense woods like maple work best but it doesn't make enough of a difference to worry too much about what type of wood you use.


LMAO! Yeah, as MrFlibble taught us all, wood only makes enough of a difference when it's the body of the guitar, not when it's a trem block put inside the body of the guitar and clamped hard against it, coupling them firmly together to form a united whole.

To Steelrz13, a well crafted block will practically convert your guitar into a hard tail, so you won't have tuning problems coming from the bridge anymore, and the string vibration will not be dampened by the sprung suspension of the whole system.
#4
Quote by Tinderwet
LMAO! Yeah, as MrFlibble taught us all, wood only makes enough of a difference when it's the body of the guitar, not when it's a trem block put inside the body of the guitar and clamped hard against it, coupling them firmly together to form a united whole.

To Steelrz13, a well crafted block will practically convert your guitar into a hard tail, so you won't have tuning problems coming from the bridge anymore, and the string vibration will not be dampened by the sprung suspension of the whole system.


trem block interactions are different then the tonal characteristics of the slab of wood that forms the entire guitar.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
Last edited by AcousticMirror at Jul 13, 2010,
#5
Quote by Tinderwet
LMAO! Yeah, as MrFlibble taught us all, wood only makes enough of a difference when it's the body of the guitar, not when it's a trem block put inside the body of the guitar and clamped hard against it, coupling them firmly together to form a united whole.

To Steelrz13, a well crafted block will practically convert your guitar into a hard tail, so you won't have tuning problems coming from the bridge anymore, and the string vibration will not be dampened by the sprung suspension of the whole system.

Hmmm... I wonder why McFlibble would say to use a strong, very dense and hard wood to block off your tremelo? Stop that ignorance right now.
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#6
Quote by Tinderwet
LMAO! Yeah, as MrFlibble taught us all, wood only makes enough of a difference when it's the body of the guitar, not when it's a trem block put inside the body of the guitar and clamped hard against it, coupling them firmly together to form a united whole.


lol nice. Mr floppy got pwned again.
#7
Quote by SunnieSide
lol nice. Mr floppy got pwned again.


ya pwnd by being right.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer