#1
Hi everyone, I just ordered some Seymour Duncan Blackouts (AHB-1) for my Gibson SG Faded and have a couple questions about installing them. First of all, should I even attempt installing them myself? I've been playing guitar for about 2 years but I've never messed with the electronics inside a guitar so I have no idea how I would even begin to install new pickups. What would I need to do it myself anyways? And if someone could give me a step-by-step guide (a VERY simple one) I would greatly appreciate it. Also, if I don't install the Blackouts myself, how much would it cost if I brought it to my local guitar shop and had someone there do it?

Any help is appreciated! Thanks!!!
#2
Well,I'd go take it to a professional.. I wouldn't want to risk anything. It depends really how much they charge per hour.. Here it is like 40 to 50 euros per hour,but you can try to lower the price down a bit. I don't know how it is there.
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#3
I wouldn't do it yourself. Bad idea. You don't want to mess anything in there up.
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#4
If you've not done it before, take it to a professional. Installing active pickups requires replacing not just the old pickups but all of the old electronics, which may also mean you need to buy a new knobs. Fitting the battery sometimes requires additional routing and a new control cover, if the existing control cavity isn't large enough (which it often isn't on American-made SGs).

Prices vary from person to person and area to area, but as a rule of thumb never settle for the cheapest guy in your area. If you can afford it, hire the most experienced, most qualified, usually the most expensive luthier you can get. If you can't quite afford them then go for the second best, then third, etc etc. Don't trust your instrument to some random, barely-qualified tech guy at a chain store.
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#5
If you can, I'd get someone to do it who'll let you watch, so when you want to change pickups again, you may not have to pay someone to do it.

In my case, I just went at it by myself, using schematics online, and eventually figured it out due to trial and error.

But I've never had anything expensive as a Gibson.

If you're really paranoid, you should take it in, but you really can't ruin your guitar by replacing electronics. In the worst case scenario, you'd have to replace all of the electronics, which would only cost $20-$25 max.

I think that if you have intentions on being a serious guitarist, you should know how your guitar works, and be able to do repairs and mods yourself.

That's just my opinion though.
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#6
Thank you for the info everyone! I think since it's my first time I'll just take it to a professional, I'll practice changing pickups myself some other time on one of my other guitars lol
#7
I really recommend seeing a professional. I wouldn't mess around with an expensive guitar like a Gibson