#1
https://dl.dropbox.com/u/8416500/reamp%20test.wav

Above is a clip I just made using a couple DIs I found online. At the beginning and the end of the clip, you can hear a really bad noise that I can't seem to get rid of. Am I doing something wrong? I'm using the left monitor output from my Tascam US-1641 into my amp with an instrument cable, and it makes that noise constantly.
#4
Quote by MightyOwned
Yup, they can. (it's called "ghetto reamping").

Expect more noise, though, then a proper reamp box.

I know many like the Radial JDI if you are too do "ghetto reamping".

http://www.radialeng.com/re-jdi.htm

I still recommend a proper reamp box though if you want the best results.


Tell me please. What exactly is a "reamp" box and how does a regular DI add noise to the signal?
#6
MightyOwned, i get what you're saying and it sounds great and all, but i think you're making it a little more complicated than it needs to be.

a regular DI is meant for that exact purpose. to step down a signal to the proper level. i've actually never heard of there being specific "reamp" boxes, but i know of plenty of professionals who use regular DI's. a good DI will not ad noise to the signal any more than one of those "reamp" boxes. if anything, they take noise out (ground lift...).

On a slightly different note, i cant for the life of me figure out why everyone on here is so excited about reamping. reamping is meant to fix mistakes in the tracking. if the tone you have already tracked just isn't working in the mix, or isn't, for some odd reason, what you want in the song, you use the clean signal (which you would have tapped during tracking if you're a decent engineer) to send out to a different amp to fix the mistake. record it right the first time and you'll never have to reamp anything. maybe i'm just missing the fun of it, but i dont get why there's so many questions about it on here...
#7
Quote by sandyman323
i've actually never heard of there being specific "reamp" boxes,


So you've identified your own limited background. They're actually *quite* well-known and considered "standard" tools in any pro studio.

Quote by sandyman323

but i know of plenty of professionals who use regular DI's. a good DI will not ad noise to the signal any more than one of those "reamp" boxes. if anything, they take noise out (ground lift...).


But they use DI's for different things than they use reamp boxes for. Most pro studios use condensor mics. But to suggest that they use them *instead* of dynamic mics or that they don't use dynamic mics at all is just silly.

Quote by sandyman323

On a slightly different note, i cant for the life of me figure out why everyone on here is so excited about reamping.


The beauty of it is this... let's say you nail the take and go home. Upon getting into the mix, it is discovered that this is NOT the guitar tone that you need. Option #1... fiddle around with different tones and keep doing more and more takes with more and more tones until you finally nail it again and get a keeper. Option #2... reamp. Use the same recorded track and play around with modellers, plugins, different amps, etc. until you find the perfect one.

Now, about re-amping itself....

Sometimes a DI box will work fine. I've done it with a DI with reasonable success.

But when your guitar tone in the first place is dependent on how hard you drive the input on the amp, a DI box will not get you all the way home. Let's say you've done your best Zak Wylde impression, driving the inputs like crazy and nailing pick squeals like they're going out of style. Plug your DI box in and send that dry track back to your amp. Where'd the squeals go? They just sound so.... wussy.... Well, you're not driving the input the same way!

Obviously, that's not the only time when how you drive the inputs matters, but it is a good example that many of us can relate to. Re-amping is VERY different from using a DI box.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.