#1
Hey guys,

I've been an avid electric guitar player for a few years, but I've never picked up an acoustic due to their massively tall fingerboards and obnoxiously wide bodies. Yesterday I went to a friend's house and she had an acoustic with a nice stratocaster-esque neck and a thin body.

Does this thinness mean a dip in sound quality? And can anyone recommend some guitars like this?
#2
The thickness of a guitar has nothing to do with sound quality. Check out the Taylor T-5 (I have one) and others that have copied it. Played unplugged, it sounds a little thin compared to a full acoustic, but plugged in, it really shines. Don't judge a book by its cover.
#3
Have you been playing jumbos with poor set ups? Check out a nice 000 or OM acoustic. They fit very nicely in ones hands and the action on my Taylor is very smooth and light. Comparable to my PRS.
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#4
Haha, I have no idea what I've been playing, but usually the body is the main factor for me. But when I played the thin body acoustic I absolutely adored it! (no homo). What is a 000 or OM? I've completely ignored acoustics for years, so you'll have to excuse my ignorance.
#5
Look for "stage," "auditorium," or performance guitars with an electric system. My Walden acoustic is a "stage" guitar and has a thinner body that makes it more comfortable to play standing up. It still sounds nice unplugged.
#6
Quote by thirdykal
Haha, I have no idea what I've been playing, but usually the body is the main factor for me. But when I played the thin body acoustic I absolutely adored it! (no homo). What is a 000 or OM? I've completely ignored acoustics for years, so you'll have to excuse my ignorance.



Are you a smaller person? Not sure how to phrase that correctly. A dreadnought might seem overly big to you if you are. 000 an OM (orchestra) styled guitars have smaller bodies and are (sometimes) thinner. They're designed more for finger picking and are a little quieter than a dread.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#7
Quote by Artemis Entreri
Are you a smaller person? Not sure how to phrase that correctly. A dreadnought might seem overly big to you if you are. 000 an OM (orchestra) styled guitars have smaller bodies and are (sometimes) thinner. They're designed more for finger picking and are a little quieter than a dread.


Shorter than average maybe? I've just looked up the Taylor. And. Wow. It's really nice, but.. is there anything for like maybe around $500 rather than like $2000?
#8
I'm drawing a blank right now, but there were two companies making Taylor T-5 copies. Ovation comes to mind, but don't quote me on that. If you buy a copy, it'll be much less than the $3000 I paid for this one. I've got a photo of it in my pics.

Just did a Google on Taylor T-5 Copy and got quite a few hits. Didn't check out the prices, but they have to be less than what I paid.
#9
You could look for a used Taylor 114 or 214. They aren't my favorite guitars but some people like them quite a lot. Also, Blueridge makes a couple of 000s just a little outside of that range. like 700


http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Blueridge-BR63-Contemporary-Series-000-Acoustic-Guitar?sku=430314

I lied
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
Last edited by Artemis Entreri at Jul 10, 2010,
#10
What about the Yamaha APX series? Did a quick search for thinline acoustic guitars, and that's one of the options that came up in my price range. Any comments on either the APX 500 or the 700?
#11
Sorry to double post, but I think I'm set on getting an Applause AE128 or AE148. Is it worth the extra cash for the 148, how does it sound unplugged without that big hole in the middle?
#12
yes, the thinnness means a dip in tone, although it depends on how thin. a smaller thinnish guitar i really like is the guild GAD-m20 and the model i bought, which is the GAD-f20. they're not thinline, but they are smaller and shallower than a lot of guitars. a used composite acoustic cargo - i have one, btw - is thinner and much more comfortable to me, and sounds huge with plenty of bass. the blackbird rider looks like a paddle, but sounds sooo great. i would have bought one but the neck was a bit deep for me.

i wouldn't get the applause or the apx if you're looking for quality tone.

btw, i've played many t5's including my husband's, and while the tone is good, when they're not plugged in they don't have much more volume than an unplugged electric.
#13
Quote by patticake
btw, i've played many t5's including my husband's, and while the tone is good, when they're not plugged in they don't have much more volume than an unplugged electric.



Wait a second. I own 7 guitars - 1 Taylor full acoustic, a Taylor Koa T-5 and 5 decent electrics. While the volume of the T-5 isn't the same as my Taylor 314CE acoustic, it is still loud - and much louder than an unplugged electric. The body on the T-5 is full hollow, just like a real acoustic. Only difference is, it''s about half the thickness and comes with 11s. I could play my T-5 in a setting of listeners and be heard just fine - not so with any electric, even a semi-hollow body. If you're playing a T-5 and finding it's not much louder than an unplugged electric, something is wrong. Afterall, this is a guitar that was designed to be played plugged or unplugged. Try saying that about an electric.
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Jul 11, 2010,
#14
Quote by patticake
yes, the thinnness means a dip in tone, although it depends on how thin. a smaller thinnish guitar i really like is the guild GAD-m20 and the model i bought, which is the GAD-f20. they're not thinline, but they are smaller and shallower than a lot of guitars. a used composite acoustic cargo - i have one, btw - is thinner and much more comfortable to me, and sounds huge with plenty of bass. the blackbird rider looks like a paddle, but sounds sooo great. i would have bought one but the neck was a bit deep for me.

i wouldn't get the applause or the apx if you're looking for quality tone.

btw, i've played many t5's including my husband's, and while the tone is good, when they're not plugged in they don't have much more volume than an unplugged electric.


I'm not really looking for fantastic tone. I'm more or less looking for a guitar with an acoustic sound that plays like an electric, because that's where I'm coming from. As long as it sounds nice and isn't absolutely abysmal, I just have more fun playing one than like a dreadnought. The body size is what really get's me in the end, acoustic guitars are just too massive.
#15
i've played around 15 of them. louder than an electric, yeah, but quieter by far than any acoustic guitar. if you look on taylor's website, you'll find it under electric guitars, not under acoustic where their acoustic electrics are.

http://www.taylorguitars.com/guitars/electric/
the electric section where the t5's are listed

http://www.taylorguitars.com/guitars/acoustic-electric/
where the acoustic electrics are listed

btw, they showed it off at the taylor roadshow we went to, and they didn't recommend you play it unplugged. they only demonstrated it amped.

Quote by KG6_Steven
Wait a second. I own 7 guitars - 1 Taylor full acoustic, a Taylor Koa T-5 and 5 decent electrics. While the volume of the T-5 isn't the same as my Taylor 314CE acoustic, it is still loud - and much louder than an unplugged electric. The body on the T-5 is full hollow, just like a real acoustic. Only difference is, it''s about half the thickness and comes with 11s. I could play my T-5 in a setting of listeners and be heard just fine - not so with any electric, even a semi-hollow body. If you're playing a T-5 and finding it's not much louder than an unplugged electric, something is wrong. Afterall, this is a guitar that was designed to be played plugged or unplugged. Try saying that about an electric.
#17
Acoustic instruments make noise by moving air. To some degree, the bigger the body, the more air that may be moved. Of course, you need a corresponding increase in energy to move the air....Heavier strings and such.
It's always a compromise.
Large-bodied "dreadnought" and "jumbo" instruments were originally made to compete with other such instruments in string-band settings. You need some power to cut through the fiddles and banjos and mandolins. As well, the guitar in these bands sort of functioned as a bass; the bass notes had to be heard by the other band members.

For playing solo, or in small "parlor" settings or even recording, smaller-bodied instruments are often more balanced.
Of course, millions of "dreadnoughts" have been produced and they are still the single most-popular body style for acoustic guitars.
#18
I play solo with an Epiphone Large Jumbo, I need the extra power because my voice is very loud. But, when I record, I place the mic at a sharp angle pointed just off the soundhole in the direction of the fretboard.

Meanwhile, there are acoustic guitars by Fender that are thinner and have a body similar to a telecaster. they've also got a neck pickup ( I think its a regular pickup, but I may be mistaken. I've never plugged it in) And its not a bad little guitar. I just don't know about how it would work for MY purposes, but you should take a look.
#19
Quote by KG6_Steven
The thickness of a guitar has nothing to do with sound quality. Check out the Taylor T-5 (I have one) and others that have copied it. Played unplugged, it sounds a little thin compared to a full acoustic, but plugged in, it really shines. Don't judge a book by its cover.



Erm, what? Yes it does, granted you can balance it out with good technique and all but guitars which are made equally as well as each other but with different thickness will have a noticeable difference in sound quality. Mainly depth, volume and projection.

Quote by Bikewer
For playing solo, or in small "parlor" settings or even recording, smaller-bodied instruments are often more balanced.


If you have enough control over your instrument, you can balance it yourself, a medium sized guitar should suffice for any situation, most of the sound comes from your technique and how you project your sound (Just compare an intermediate player to an advanced one or a virtuoso, the increase in quality and volume of sound will be staggering).


TS, while a thinner guitar usually (I stress this word) means a dip in sound quality, you should be looking for the following when purchasing an acoustic guitar.

Equal volume up the fretboard
How well it projects (You want to aim your sound to the other side of the room, some guitars have bad projection and it makes your audience less entertained)
How playable it is
How well you can vary your tone colour and volume
And of course, the tone.

I'm not exactly well versed in steel stringed models but Alhambra guitars do have a model of guitar which is modelled to feel like an electric guitar in playability and body size, I can't remember the model name though.
#20
Quote by patticake
i've played around 15 of them. louder than an electric, yeah, but quieter by far than any acoustic guitar. if you look on taylor's website, you'll find it under electric guitars, not under acoustic where their acoustic electrics are.

http://www.taylorguitars.com/guitars/electric/
the electric section where the t5's are listed

http://www.taylorguitars.com/guitars/acoustic-electric/
where the acoustic electrics are listed

btw, they showed it off at the taylor roadshow we went to, and they didn't recommend you play it unplugged. they only demonstrated it amped.


Sure. It's going to be somewhat quieter than a full acoustic, just due to the fact you've got less body. A friend of mine who's played for over 30 years loves the unplugged tone of my T-5. For that matter, I'm also quite pleased with it. This is the same guitar I use when giving guitar lessons and I have no problem competing with a full acoustic or even a plugged in electric.

Not sure why Taylor didn't recommend playing it unplugged. Their website sure proclaims it capable of doing both. Maybe they didn't recommend playing it unplugged because they were in a roadshow event with lots of customers in attendance.

Bottom line, if you think a T-5 is in your future, go play one and decide for yourself. They're a very decent hybrid acoustic/electric.

Here's what Taylor says on their website:

T5 Electric / Acoustic
Soon after the T5 hit the market in 2005, the music industry press nominated it for Electric Guitar of the Year. And Acoustic Guitar of the Year. Which pretty much sums it all up: the T5 is an electric/acoustic that defines the hybrid category. Today, the versatile T5 is the top-selling semi-hollow body guitar and the only one that uses all-magnetic pickups for both its electric and acoustic tones. That means real acoustic tones, real electric tones, and everything in between. The T5 also features proprietary Taylor pickups, 5-Way switch, and Taylor T-Lock™ neck joint.

And oh yeah, it won both awards.