#1
I've been playing for a while now. Call me cocky, but I think I'm ready to play in a band. I don't care if I play rhythm guitar, lead guitar or bass, as long as I play. The trouble is, in my immediate surroundings, there are practically no musicians. The few among me who are capable of playing lack the urge to play seriously. This poses a problem for me. I have always thought that whatever bands are out there, they were always friends first and band members second. I tend to think that it is essential to know the people you play with in a non-musical environment to have any sort of chemistry. So my problem is very real. Do I put out an advertisement for musicians willing to play my style of music? Or to I wait for new friends to arise, friends who I can relate to and who also play my style of music?

This is something I have been thinking about for a while... UG, please help me...
Equipment:
-Ibanez GIO
-Fender American Standard Strat HSS
-Acoustic Schneider Guitar
-ARIA STB-PB-DX Bass
-Vox VT50AD-XL
-Roland Cube-30 Bass
-Digitech RP-250
-Blue guitar pick
Proud Member of UG's 80's Rock Fan Club
#2
Quote by KasanDude
I have always thought that whatever bands are out there, they were always friends first and band members second.

There's your mistake, is more likely to be successful the other way around. When you start playing with a complete stranger you're only concerned about one thing, how good they are. When playing with friends you tend to overlook skill because, well, they're your friends.
#3
Quote by KasanDude
I've been playing for a while now. Call me cocky, but I think I'm ready to play in a band. I don't care if I play rhythm guitar, lead guitar or bass, as long as I play. The trouble is, in my immediate surroundings, there are practically no musicians. The few among me who are capable of playing lack the urge to play seriously. This poses a problem for me. I have always thought that whatever bands are out there, they were always friends first and band members second. I tend to think that it is essential to know the people you play with in a non-musical environment to have any sort of chemistry. So my problem is very real. Do I put out an advertisement for musicians willing to play my style of music? Or to I wait for new friends to arise, friends who I can relate to and who also play my style of music?

This is something I have been thinking about for a while... UG, please help me...


Well this is wrong for starters: http://heavymetal.about.com/od/interviews/a/direngreyinterv.htm

Read the second to last paragraph. That is one of the guitarists of Japan's biggest rock band speaking there.

Seriously, play with strangers, mostly because if you do get into arguments with them, or if they are just a bit rubbish, you won't lose a good friend.

I've met plenty of people to start bands with, and when it hasn't worked out I've been able to tell them it won't work out and block them out of my life completely, whereas when my first band, consisting of me and my 3 best mates, broke down, it caused me to fall out seriously with 2 of them on separate occasions, which was horrible for me.

Please, unless you know your friends are amazing and have exactly the same taste as you, don't start a band with them.
Also, making one good friend who you get on with, likes the same music as you and plays an instrument well is quite a long shot, making 3 or 4 friends like this won't happen anytime soon, I would recommend putting out some ads and actively looking for band members, not new friends.
#4
It's pretty rare for band members to truly be great friends. You have to find people you get along with, obviously - it would be torture to be crammed into a small van with people you can't stand, and that often ends in disaster (see the case of Sting and Copeland, Stuart). But being best friends? Not necessary. In my most successful band, I was friendly with everyone, but I wouldn't say any of us were best friends (with the exception of the bassist and singer, who were brothers). And you see that all the way to the highest levels of success - I interviewed the drummer from Our Lady Peace a few months ago, and when I asked him how the departure of Mike Turner, their old guitarist, affected the band, he was perfectly frank. It didn't affect the band much at all, because it wasn't like they were getting divorced, it was more like they were losing a business partner. Even bands where everyone started out as buddies tend to have people drift apart. Anthony Kiedis and Flea almost never hang out outside of RHCP, and that probably goes a great deal to them still being around.
So you need to find musicians, not buddies. I don't know why you think you need to have some kind of close personal connection in order to get along musically.
#5
First of all there are no rules. There have been successful bands where friends and family members who can hardly play have been drafted in and others where the best musicians have been used only. By and large band members become friends despite all the fallings out amongst these posts.

Most bands coalesce around a dynamic duo. Two mates who get things started, singer and guitarist or two guitarists are most common but.. no rules. Start looking for a kindred spirit just to jam with. Or find a Dynamic duo to become musketeers with.

Have a think about 'my style of music' obviously it is better to play stuff you love but sometimes the option is to be flexible or play by yourself. If the opportunity comes up to play with any band then try it. There's so much more than being a good musician to being in a live band. You'll learn all this in any band even if it is not your kind of thing. Also playing other types of music extends you as a musician and you'll learn loads of stuff which you will take to future projects. Our drummer is 35 years younger than the rest of us and joined for one gig. He stayed for two years and we are gigging twice a month now. He also plays for a jazz band and has taken up all sorts of other opportunities which means he is going off to University as an experienced musician.

Try and get seen playing live. If you can't sing then find a singer and go out acoustic. There should be bars or clubs who will let you play and I don't know what the scene is like in the Czech Republic but if there are any open mic nights like we have they are great ways to meet other musicians.

Finally go to hear as much live music as you can and try to chat to the musicians, most of them will be encouraging and will have loads of things to share.

Good luck
#6
Quote by pwrmax
When you start playing with a complete stranger you're only concerned about one thing, how good they are.


Mmmm..... close, but I disagree. I think it's more true that you're looking for a good balance between "who is the best player I will enjoy working with who has the same kinds of goals and expectations?"

It's really a balancing act.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.