#1
So I walked out of my nearest GC store with an amazing Seagull acoustic today after doing tons of research. I love its pristine sound and build quality with no regrets buying it. At first I was looking primarily for the Original S6 but could not find it. Instead, I found the same original but in Dreadnought. I still loved it and instead of the original S6 for $400, this Dreadnought was listed for $375. I bought it and now I love it to death.

However, after I took it home, I was playing with it and looked all around it when I noticed inside that the Seagull sticker just labels it as "Original S6" and a serial number below. There is no label of Dreadnought anywhere. I looked on GC's site and could not find any sign of "Original S6 Dreadnought" anywhere or on Google. All I have seen are Coastline Dreadnoughts, Maritime, Slim, etc, which none are the original. Do I in fact have the Original S6 I meant to buy or is there actually an Original S6 Dreadnought I can't find online?

Thanks for the help. Nonetheless, I love this guitar and won't give it up anytime soon!
Last edited by MusicEnthusiast at Jul 11, 2010,
#2
You should be able to tell if it is a dreadnought or not by looking at it. Does it have a rounded bottom and shoulders like the S6, or are they squared like a dreadnought?
#3
It looks round to me, but here's a picture that might help ya confirm whether it is or not.

Last edited by MusicEnthusiast at Jul 11, 2010,
#4
yep thats a dreadnought. you're good to go. no worries. enjoy the guitar, mine looks identical and is a dream.
#5
Awesome! I just love everything about it. I wonder why it's not on the GC site though... that's interesting.
#6
yup, that's an original s6, all right. and a dread - great guitar, isn't it? i loved mine.
#7
The term "dreadnought" is kind of loosely applied as well; actual dimensions vary from manufacturer to manufacturer. It's just a large-bodied guitar...

How many forum members are aware that the term was originally applied not to musical instruments but to battleships?
#8
martin actually named dreads after the battleships because both were so large.

Quote by Bikewer
How many forum members are aware that the term was originally applied not to musical instruments but to battleships?
#9
It's also interesting to know my Seagull is a dreadnought when it almost looks smaller than some other models I compared it to at GC. Cool to know about the military history connection there.